Saving The Amazon News

Brazilian meatpacker expands with World Bank funding but fails to reduce impacts in the Amazon

The International Finance Corporation injected $85 million into Minerva, even though it was aware that the company’s activities involved deforestation, child labor and land conflict risks. In recent years, Minerva has become Latin America’s largest meat exporter. But doubts remain over whether it has strictly complied with envi-ronmental and social compensation guidelines specified in its contract.

Brazilian taxpayers subsidizing Amazon-clearing cattle ranches, study shows

A new study shows taxpayer money is helping to prop up the beef industry in Brazil, one of the primary drivers of deforestation in the country. For every dollar of tax revenue collected from the industry, only 20 cents effectively goes to society — the rest goes back to producers in the form of incentives, easy credit, and even debt forgiveness.
Kanamari indigenous child in Vale do Javari, in Amazonas state, one of the most vulnerable indigenous reserves to COVID-19, according to an analysis by the Socioenvironmental Institute (ISA), a Brazilian NGO. Image by Bruno Kelly/Amazônia Real

Evicted indigenous people in Manaus struggle to stay safe amid COVID-19 crisis

Some 400 indigenous people displaced from an informal settlement in Manaus have struggled to make a living amid scarce jobs and limited income sources during the COVID-19 crisis. The capital of Amazonas state, Manaus accounts for Brazil’s fourth-highest number of deaths due to COVID-19; authorities warn that the state’s health system is close to its limit.
Kanamari indigenous child in Vale do Javari, in Amazonas state, one of the most vulnerable indigenous reserves to COVID-19, according to an analysis by the Socioenvironmental Institute (ISA), a Brazilian NGO. Image by Bruno Kelly/Amazônia Real