tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/gas1 gas news from mongabay.com 2014-02-20T19:10:42Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12718 2014-02-04T12:57:00Z 2014-02-20T19:10:42Z Gas company to drill in Manu National Park buffer zone, imperiling indigenous people The Peruvian government has approved plans for gas company Pluspetrol to move deeper into a supposedly protected reserve for indigenous peoples and the buffer zone of the Manu National Park in the Amazon rainforest. The approval follows the government rescinding a highly critical report on the potential impacts of the operations by the Culture Ministry (MINCU), the resignation of the Culture Minister and other Ministry personnel, and repeated criticism from Peruvian and international civil society. Jeremy Hance -11.813588 -72.499695 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12716 2014-02-03T17:25:00Z 2014-02-03T17:40:50Z Total says it will not drill in any World Heritage Sites One of the world's largest oil and gas companies, Total, has committed to leave the planet's UNESCO World Heritage Sites untouched, according to the United Nations. The UN says the French energy giant has sent written confirmation that it will not explore or extract fossil fuels from any of the world's over 200 natural World Heritage Sites. Jeremy Hance -0.081711 29.518147 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12490 2013-12-05T18:14:00Z 2013-12-05T18:31:58Z Top scientists propose ambitious plans to safeguard world from devastating climate change <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/kauai_1097.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Two degrees is too much: that's the conclusion of a landmark new paper by top economists and climatologists, including James Hansen formerly of NASA. The paper, appearing in the open-access journal PLoS ONE, argues that global society must aim for only one degree Celsius of warming above pre-industrial levels to avoid the worst impact of climate change, and not the two degrees Celsius agreed on by the world's governments. But given that the world's governments are not yet on track to even achieve the two degree target, how could we lock in just one? A combination of renewable energy, nuclear power, and, most importantly, a rising price on carbon emissions, according to the eighteen scientists. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12428 2013-11-21T16:38:00Z 2013-11-21T21:34:42Z Canopy crusade: world's highest network of camera traps keeps an eye on animals impacted by gas project <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1114interview150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Oil, gas, timber, gold: the Amazon rainforest is rich in resources, and their exploitation is booming. As resource extraction increases, so does the development of access roads and pipelines. These carve their way through previously intact forest, thereby interrupting the myriad pathways of the species that live there. For species that depend on the rainforest canopy, this can be particularly problematic. Tiffany Roufs -4.915833 -74.274903 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12212 2013-10-17T13:59:00Z 2013-10-25T13:23:26Z Map reveals gas company flying over Manu National Park <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1017.ANEXO3.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A map in an internal Peruvian government report reveals that gas company Pluspetrol has been flying over the protected Manu National Park (MNP) in the south-eastern Peruvian Amazon where UNESCO says the biodiversity "exceeds that of any other place on earth." The over-flight was done via helicopter on 3 February, 2012 by Pluspetrol personnel together with a team from the National Institute e Development of Andean, Amazonian and Afroperuvian Peoples (INDEPA). Jeremy Hance -12.068867 -71.386871 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12175 2013-10-08T13:45:00Z 2013-10-08T13:55:22Z Divestment campaign could cause considerable damage to fossil fuel industry A campaign to persuade investors to take their money out of the fossil fuel sector is growing faster than any previous divestment campaign and could cause significant damage to coal, oil and gas companies, according to a study from the University of Oxford. The report compares the current fossil fuel divestment campaign, which has attracted 41 institutions since 2010, with those against tobacco, apartheid in South Africa, armaments, gambling and pornography. It concludes that the direct financial impact of such campaigns on share prices or the ability to raise funds is small but the reputational damage can still have major financial consequences. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12172 2013-10-07T18:31:00Z 2013-10-07T18:44:08Z Scientists uncover high radioactivity near fracking site in Pennsylvania Scientists have for the first time found dangerous levels of radioactivity and salinity at a shale gas waste disposal site that could contaminate drinking water. If the UK follows in the steps of the US "shale gas revolution", it should impose regulations to stop such radioactive buildup, they said. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12024 2013-09-05T19:05:00Z 2013-09-05T21:47:27Z Organization proposes climate change warning labels at the gas pump <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/0905warning150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Rob Shirkey is the founder of the Toronto-based, not-for-profit organization Our Horizon. Inspired by his grandfather's last words to him, "Do what you love," Shirkey quit his job and founded the organization. Our Horizon is founded on the basis that we are all responsible for global climate change through our daily collective choices. It endeavors to influence those choices, specifically with the goal of convincing municipalities to require climate change warning labels on gasoline pumps. Tiffany Roufs 43.656943 -79.390183 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11919 2013-08-15T16:29:00Z 2013-08-15T16:39:48Z Fracking sucks up all the water from Texas town Beverly McGuire saw the warning signs before the town well went dry: sand in the toilet bowl, the sputter of air in the tap, a pump working overtime to no effect. But it still did not prepare her for the night last month when she turned on the tap and discovered the tiny town where she had made her home for 35 years was out of water. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11905 2013-08-13T14:47:00Z 2013-08-13T15:06:47Z Two children given lifetime gag order on fracking impacts Two young children in Pennsylvania were banned from talking about fracking for the rest of their lives under a gag order imposed under a settlement reached by their parents with a leading oil and gas company. The sweeping gag order was imposed under a $750,000 settlement between the Hallowich family and Range Resources Corp, a leading oil and gas driller. It provoked outrage on Monday among environmental campaigners and free speech advocates. Jeremy Hance 40.149685 -79.543691 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11639 2013-06-24T22:13:00Z 2013-06-26T18:13:38Z Over 30 tons of explosives to be detonated in Manu National Park buffer zone A consortium of gas companies headed by Pluspetrol and including Hunt Oil plans on detonating approximately 38 tons of explosives in the south-east Peruvian Amazon in one of the most biodiverse regions in the world. The detonations are part of 2D and 3D seismic tests planned by Pluspetrol in its search for new gas deposits in the Camisea region&#8212;plans that are currently pending approval by Peru's Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM). Jeremy Hance -11.697962 -71.85379 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11581 2013-06-11T22:04:00Z 2013-06-11T22:10:12Z Bachmann was right? $2 gas, with a catch One of Republican House member Michele Bachmann's most famous and controversial campaign promises &#8212; that Americans would see $2-a-gallon gasoline prices if she were elected president &#8212; may have come true without her even winning the nomination. Only not in the way she expected. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11328 2013-05-01T13:32:00Z 2013-05-01T14:07:12Z Ten U.S. cities pledge to kick fossil fuel investments to the curb The cities of San Francisco and Seattle have pulled their money out of fossil fuel companies, taking a climate divestment campaign from college campuses to local government. The campaign group 350.org said on Thursday it had won commitments from a total of 10 cities and towns to divest from 200 of leading fossil fuel companies. Jeremy Hance 37.740313 -122.426605 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11288 2013-04-23T13:10:00Z 2013-04-23T13:13:18Z Featured video: Earth Day message from indigenous tribes in the Peruvian Amazon A new video by Alianza Arkana includes an Earth Day message from the indigenous peoples in the Peruvian Amazon who are facing the existential threats of logging and fossil fuel development on their traditional lands. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11278 2013-04-22T13:24:00Z 2013-04-22T13:37:50Z 'Carbon bubble' could cause next global financial crisis The world could be heading for a major economic crisis as stock markets inflate an investment bubble in fossil fuels to the tune of trillions of dollars, according to leading economists. "The financial crisis has shown what happens when risks accumulate unnoticed," said Lord (Nicholas) Stern, a professor at the London School of Economics. He said the risk was "very big indeed" and that almost all investors and regulators were failing to address it. Jeremy Hance 40.707873 -74.009063 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11251 2013-04-17T13:09:00Z 2013-04-17T16:49:40Z At top of the world, activists say exploiting Arctic is 'utter madness' Four young explorers including American actor Ezra Miller have planted a flag on the seabed at the north pole and demanded the region is declared a global sanctuary. The expedition, organized by Greenpeace, saw the flag lowered in a time capsule that contained the signatures of nearly 3 million people who are calling for a ban on exploitation in the region. Jeremy Hance 89.189705 0.000587 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10857 2013-02-11T20:13:00Z 2013-02-11T20:26:28Z Fossil fuel company looking to exploit deposits in Manu National Park Pluspetrol, an Argentine oil and gas company, is eyeing a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Amazon rainforest for gas production, according to documents seen by the Guardian. Manu National Park in eastern Peru is considered one of the most biodiverse places on Earth and is home to indigenous tribes living in voluntary isolation. Jeremy Hance -12.01783 -71.713486 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10715 2013-01-16T20:03:00Z 2013-01-16T20:24:06Z New website tracks protected areas under attack <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0116.padddtracker.Screen-Shot-2013-01-16-at-1.57.33-PM.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The struggle to safeguard wild lands and species doesn't end when a park or protected area is created. In fact, social scientists and conservationists are increasingly uncovering a global trend whereby even long-established protected areas come under pressure by industrial, governmental, or community interests. This phenomenon, recently dubbed PADDD (which stands for Protected Area Downgrading, Downsizing, and Degazettement), includes protected areas that see their legal status lowered (downgraded), lose a section of their land (downsized), or are abolished entirely (degazetted). Now, a new website from WWF seeks to track PADDD events worldwide. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10540 2012-12-08T03:38:00Z 2012-12-23T22:00:03Z 108 million ha of Amazon rainforest up for oil and gas exploration, development Concessions for oil and gas exploration and extraction are proliferating across Amazon countries, reports a comprehensive new atlas of the region. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10523 2012-12-05T17:16:00Z 2012-12-05T17:26:10Z Wealthy nations' fossil fuel subsidies dwarf climate financing A new analysis finds that 21 wealthy countries spent five-times more on subsidizing fossil fuels in 2011 than they have on providing funds for poor nations to cut greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The analysis, by Oil Change International, comes in the midst of the current UN Climate Summit held in Doha, Qatar; progress at the talks has been stymied due to the gulf between poor and rich nations, including on the issue of climate financing. Jeremy Hance 25.280092 51.534948 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10462 2012-11-28T17:42:00Z 2012-12-23T22:05:51Z E.U. OKs biofuels produced from certified palm oil <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/12/1128palmfruit150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The European Commission has approved palm oil-based biodiesel for the renewable fuels standard provided it is certified under the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), a body that sets social and environmental criteria for palm oil production. The move, which could dramatically boost sales of palm oil in Europe, was sharply criticized by environmental activists, who said that without stronger safeguards, increased palm oil production could increase deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10384 2012-11-13T09:09:00Z 2012-11-13T09:32:40Z U.S. to become world's largest oil producer in 5 years In a dramatic reversal, the United States is set to become the world's largest producer of oil by 2017, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency (IEA). Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10276 2012-10-17T21:17:00Z 2012-12-02T22:36:50Z Will we need to pull carbon out of the atmosphere to save ourselves? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay.s3.amazonaws.com/colombia/150/colombia_3765.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>This year saw the Arctic sea ice extent fall to a new and shocking low, while the U.S. experienced it warmest month ever on record (July), beating even Dust Bowl temperatures. Meanwhile, a flood of new research has convincingly connected a rise in extreme weather events, especially droughts and heatwaves, to global climate change, and a recent report by the DARA Group and Climate Vulnerability Forum finds that climate change contributes to around 400,000 deaths a year and costs the world 1.6 percent of its GDP, or $1.2 trillion. All this and global temperatures have only risen about 0.8 degrees Celsius (1.44 degrees Fahrenheit) since the early Twentieth Century. Scientists predict that temperatures could rise between 1.1 degrees Celsius (2 degrees Fahrenheit) to a staggering 6.4 degrees Celsius (11.5 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10268 2012-10-15T12:45:00Z 2012-10-15T13:12:35Z UNESCO disturbed by gas plans for Peru’s Manu National Park <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/peru/150/manu_0517.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Major concerns about the danger posed by gas exploration in a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Amazon rainforest has prompted UNESCO to promise to lobby the Peruvian government. Manu National Park’s biological diversity exceeds "that of any other place on Earth," according to UNESCO's website, and is inhabited by indigenous people living in "voluntary isolation" who could be decimated if they come into contact with gas workers. Jeremy Hance -12.01783 -71.713486 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10074 2012-08-29T01:44:00Z 2012-08-29T01:46:35Z U.S. boosts fuel economy standard to 54.5 mpg The Obama administration finalized rules that will boost the national fuel economy standard for cars and light trucks to 54.5 miles per gallon for the 2025 model year. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10063 2012-08-26T22:27:00Z 2012-08-27T16:08:01Z Greenpeace abandons occupation of Arctic oil drilling rig after workers throw metal at them On Friday the head of Greenpeace, Kumi Naidoo, and five other activists occupied an Arctic oil platform owned by Russian oil and gas giant Gazprom to protest exploiting fossil fuel beds in the Arctic ocean. The action by Greenpeace was short-lived after workers began spraying them with cold water from high-powered hoses and then threw pieces of metal at them, according to Naidoo, who communicated via Twitter during the civil disobedience. Jeremy Hance 69.59589 53.862303 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9950 2012-08-01T00:24:00Z 2012-08-01T00:41:18Z Drought pits farmers against frackers Drought has created a standoff over water supplies in the U.S. Midwest between energy producers and farmers, reports Bloomberg. Natural gas and oil producers have been forced to seek new water sources as they mull calls from farmers and activists to recycle their water, a practice that would make 'fracking' more expensive. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9634 2012-06-07T17:51:00Z 2012-12-02T22:39:27Z Want to stop climate change: buy fossil fuel deposits <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://travel.mongabay.com/china/150/china_104-8239.JPG" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Governments, NGOs, and others fighting climate change should consider buying coal and oil deposits&#8212;not to exploit them, but to keep them from being exploited, according to a bold new policy paper in the Journal of Political Economy. Economist Bard Harstad with the Kellogg School of Management argues that climate coalitions could quickly slash carbon emissions by purchasing and conserving marginal fossil fuel deposits, a strategy that would solve the current problem of carbon leakage, i.e. when cutting emissions in one place pushes others to burn more elsewhere. Given that carbon emissions rose to a new record last year&#8212;31.6 gigatons&#8212;and carbon has hit 400 parts per million (ppm) in the atmosphere for the first time in at least 800,000 years, Harstad's analysis comes at a time when scientists are warning that urgent and bold action is needed to mitigate global climate change before it becomes irreversible. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9578 2012-05-29T15:36:00Z 2012-05-31T15:01:44Z Another record in global carbon emissions puts globe on track for 'devastating consequences' <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/800px-182619562_00d6f703b6_b.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Last year global carbon dioxide emissions rose 3.2 percent to a new record of 31.6 gigatons, keeping the planet on track to suffer dangerous climate change, which could propel global crop failures, sea level rise, worsening extreme weather, and mass extinction. According to data from the International Energy Agency (IEA), China's carbon emissions rose the most last year (9.3 percent) while emissions in Europe and the U.S. dipped slightly. China is the currently the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases, while the U.S. has emitted the most historically. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9470 2012-05-02T18:09:00Z 2012-05-02T18:15:25Z Gas development pushing pronghorn out of vital wintering grounds Development of natural gas fields in Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is pushing pronghorn (<i>Antilocapra americana</i>) out of crucial wintering grounds, a situation that could result in a population decline according to a new study in <i>Biological Conservation</i>. By tracking 125 female pronghorn over five years in Wyoming, researchers found that highest quality habitat had fallen by over 80 percent in two vast gas fields on land owned by the government's Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8556 2011-10-17T19:14:00Z 2011-10-17T19:20:11Z New study: price carbon at the point of fossil fuel extraction Global carbon emissions are a complicated matter. Currently, officials estimate national fossil fuel-related emissions by what is burned (known as production) within a nation, but this approach underestimates the emissions contributions from countries that extract oil and oil for export. Is there a better way to account for a country's total climate change footprint? Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8371 2011-09-07T17:04:00Z 2011-09-07T18:30:49Z Peru president signs indigenous rights act into law Peru's new president, Ollanta Humala, has signed into law a measure requiring that indigenous groups are consulted prior to any mining, logging, or oil and gas projects on their land. If properly enforced, the new legislation will give indigenous people free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) over such industrial projects, though the new law does not go so far as to allow local communities a veto over projects. Still, the law puts Peru in line with the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention of 1989, which the South American nation ratified nearly two decades ago. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8209 2011-07-27T16:22:00Z 2011-07-27T16:45:56Z Climate activist sentenced to 2 years in jail for civil disobedience Yesterday a federal court in Salt Lake City, Utah convicted climate activist Tim DeChristopher of defrauding the US government, sentencing him to two years in jail and a fine of $10,000, reports the Associated Press. In December 2008, Tim DeChristopher, won the mineral rights for 22,500 acres of US Interior Department land at a Bureau of Land Management auction with a $1.8 million bid. The only problem was: DeChristopher did not have the money to pay for his bid nor did he ever intend to pay for his drilling rights. Instead, he was committing civil disobedience in order to draw attention to the oil industry and government's complacence on global climate change; in his words, DeChristopher meant to 'expose, embarrass, and hold accountable the oil industry to the point that it cut into their $100 billion profits'. However, his actions have now landed him in jail. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8002 2011-06-09T17:40:00Z 2011-06-09T17:49:37Z Russia and Norway carve up wildlife-rich Arctic sea for fossil fuels As climate change melts the Arctic sea ice, nations are rushing to carve up once-inaccessible areas for oil and gas exploitation, industrial fishing, and shipping routes. Now, BBC reports that Russia and Norway have essentially agreed to split the Arctic's Barents Sea in half —one of the region's richest in biodiversity and ecological productivity—for industrial exploitation. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7349 2011-01-26T22:39:00Z 2011-01-26T23:00:04Z Is Obama's clean energy revolution possible? Last night US President Barack Obama called for a massive green energy make-over of the world's largest economy. Describing the challenge as 'this generation's Sputnik moment' the US president set a goal of producing 80 percent of America's energy by clean sources by 2035. While this may sound improbable, two recent analyses back the president up, arguing that a global clean energy revolution is entirely possible within a few decades using contemporary technology and without breaking the bank. "Based on our findings, there are no technological or economic barriers to converting the entire world to clean, renewable energy sources," Mark Z. Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford said in a press release. "It is a question of whether we have the societal and political will." Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6116 2010-05-24T18:02:00Z 2010-05-25T14:15:24Z More of the Amazon opened to oil development <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/0803.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Perupetro, the Peruvian government's oil and gas corporate leasing body, announced last week that it will open an additional 25 lots for oil and gas exploration in the Amazon covering an area of 10 million hectares (nearly 25 million acres). Peru's national Amazon indigenous group, AIDESEP, criticized the move calling it a 'new threat' to Peru's indigenous group. According to Amazon Watch these new lots mean that 75 percent of the Peruvian Amazon is now open to oil and gas exploration and drilling. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5673 2010-02-16T21:59:00Z 2011-01-05T18:45:40Z Under siege: oil and gas concessions cover 41 percent of the Peruvian Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/0803.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A new study in the <i>Environmental Research Letter</i> finds that the Peruvian Amazon is being overrun by the oil and gas industries. According to the study 41 percent of the Peruvian Amazon is currently covered by 52 separate oil and gas concessions, nearly six times as much land as was covered in 2003. "We found that more of the Peruvian Amazon has recently been leased to oil and gas companies than at any other time on record," explained co-author Dr. Matt Finer of the Washington DC-based Save America’s Forests in a press release. The concessions even surpass the oil boom in the region during the 1970s and 80s, which resulted in extensive environmental damage. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5447 2010-01-12T17:37:00Z 2010-01-12T17:55:45Z Dams a 'monument of corruption': Baru Bian, new leader of Sarawak's People's Justice Party In an interview with the Bruno Manser Fond, the new leader of the Malaysian state Sarawak's People's Justice Party (PKR), Baru Bian, spoke out against the state government's plans for mega-dams in the middle of the rainforest, as well as continued rainforest destruction and corruption. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4857 2009-08-17T16:35:00Z 2009-08-17T16:44:08Z Oil companies in the UK are big users of palm oil biodiesel British motorists are unwittingly big consumers of palm oil produced on rainforest lands in southeast Asia, reports <i>The Times</i>. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4739 2009-07-16T18:25:00Z 2009-07-16T19:20:43Z Smart biofuels that don't hurt people or the environment are possible <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/chart-palm-corn-soy-150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Sustainable biofuels can be a reality but only in combination with reductions in fuel demand and increased productivity on existing agricultural lands, argue researchers writing in the journal <i>Science</i>. Five years ago biofuels were seen as a panacea for the world's energy hunger and the need to address climate change, but increased production of biofuels soon contributed to a clutch of problems, including competition with food, resulting in rising prices, and large-scale conversion of rainforests and tropical grasslands for feedstocks, resulting in biodiversity loss and increased greenhouse gas emissions. Environmentalists and scientists condemned many biofuels &#8212; including ethanol produced from Midwestern corn ethanol and biodiesel generated from European rapeseed and Southeast Asian palm oil &#8212; as a short-sighted energy solution. Some biofuels were found to be even worse for the environment, and more costly, than conventional gasoline. However some researchers remain optimistic that smart biofuel production could help meet energy demand without hurting people or the planet. In a <i>Science</i> Policy Forum piece, David Tilman and colleagues explore some of these options, noting that biofuels can be produced in substantial quantities at low environmental cost Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4581 2009-05-28T18:11:00Z 2009-05-28T18:27:56Z Oil and gas bonanza discovered in the Arctic <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/0529_oilgas.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>30 percent of the world’s undiscovered gas and 13 percent of its undiscovered oil is located north of the Arctic Circle, offering a potential bonanza for Russia, report researchers writing in the journal <i>Science</i>. Assessing natural resources around the North Pole, researchers from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) say the majority of undiscovered oil and gas will be found underwater on continental shelves, providing economic opportunities for countries with Arctic claims, including the U.S., Canada, Denmark/Greenland, Norway and Russia. The largest deposits of natural gas are expected in areas claimed by both Russia and Norway, whereas the most likely place for oil in the Arctic is in the Chukchi Sea, off northern Alaska. Rhett Butler