Discovery of new population boosts almost-extinct Colombian bird

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
September 28, 2010



The Baudo oropendola (Psarocolius cassini) has gone from less than a dozen known individuals to nearly a hundred due to the discovery of two new colonies in northwestern Colombia by local conservation group, Fundación ProAves. However, the new colonies are located in an unprotected area currently being impacted by deforestation.

George Fenwick, president of American Bird Conservancy which focuses on bird conservation, said in a press release that his organization "is thrilled to have helped fund the research expedition that led to this stunning discovery of these two new colonies of this rare bird. Now we need to work with ProAves to conserve and protect them."


The endangered Baudo oropendola (Psarocolius cassini). Fundación ProAves.
The new colonies were discovered some 75 miles from the known population.

As members of the Icterid family, oropendolas are passerine birds native to Central and South America related to blackbirds and orioles.

A colorful and very vocal bird, the Baudo oropendola is known by a distinct pink cheek patch. It is currently listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List.







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CITATION:
Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com (September 28, 2010).

Discovery of new population boosts almost-extinct Colombian bird .

http://news.mongabay.com/2010/0928-hance_oropendola.html