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Audio: Mongabay investigation reveals large-scale land invasion in Peruvian Amazon

  • On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Chris Fagan about the investigative report he recently filed for Mongabay that revealed a large-scale illegal land invasion encroaching on national parks and indigenous reserves in the Peruvian Amazon.
  • While traveling up the Sepahua River with indigenous guides who are part of local vigilance committees dedicated to protecting the land, Fagan counted more than 250 plots of land illegally parceled out. Some of those parcels were still untouched, but others had already been deforested and converted to cropland.
  • Fagan joins us today to discuss the findings of his investigation, what it was like to encounter the deforestation he and his guides discovered deep in the Amazon rainforest, and who is responsible for evicting the land grabbers.

On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Chris Fagan about the investigative report he recently filed for Mongabay that revealed a large-scale illegal land invasion encroaching on national parks and indigenous reserves in the Peruvian Amazon.

Listen here:

 

Many of the land grabbers are from a region of Peru notorious for cocaine production, Fagan found, and were recruited by land traffickers to join agricultural associations focused on growing cacao, though the traffickers’ ultimate goal is likely to grow coca, the raw material cocaine is made from.

While traveling up the Sepahua River with indigenous guides who are part of local vigilance committees dedicated to protecting the land, Fagan counted more than 250 plots of land illegally parceled out. Some of those parcels were still untouched, but others had already been deforested and converted to cropland.

Fagan, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon for over 15 years as executive director of the Upper Amazon Conservancy, joins us today to discuss the findings of his investigation, what it was like to encounter the deforestation he and his guides discovered deep in the Amazon rainforest, and who is responsible for evicting the land grabbers. You can read his investigative report here on Mongabay.

Here’s this episode’s top news:

Would you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.

If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.

You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.

Chris Fagan (front), Executive Director of Upper Amazon Conservancy (UAC) with Sepahua Community Vigilance Committee Coordinator Pasqual Miqueas Murayori. Upper Sepahua River, Peru. Photo Credit: Jason Houston/Upper Amazon Conservancy.

Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001

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