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World population growth rate continues to plummet

(05/02/2005) According to figures released earlier this year by the UN, global birth rates fell to the lowest level in recorded history with the average woman in the developing world having 2.9 children, down from an average of nearly 6 babies in the 1970s. UN demographers also predict that fertility in most of the developing world will fall below the replacement level (2.1 children per woman) before the end of the 21st century. Factors leading to falling birth rates include increased level education for women, the use of contraceptives, and urbanization.


Madagascar travel forum and discussion board launched at WildMadagascar.org

(04/28/2005) WildMadagascar.org, a leading information site on Madagascar, today launched a beta version of a travel forum on Madagascar. The forum will serve as a place where people can discuss travel in Madagascar and the surrounding region.


Surfing in Paradise: Surf Trip to Bahia, Brazil

(04/27/2005) Surfing in Bahia is great even with the aguaviva jellyfish.


Circumventing Washington: Corporate America and activists bypass the White House

(04/27/2005) Corporate America, Activists & Circumventing Washington: A New Approach to Environmental Lobbying. Green groups partner with corporate interests to bring changes in business practices.


Madagascar Larger Than Life, New Life for Madagascar's Tourist Industry?

(04/26/2005) One of the most anticipated films of the spring is Dreamworks's Madagascar. Scheduled for release over the often profitable Memorial Day weekend, this new feature is generating lots of buzz for the studio as well as the actors voicing the animated creatures featured in the movie. Madagascar, the country, hopes the film will stimulate its tourist industry in a way similar to Kenya's after the 1985 film Out of Africa was released.


Borneo's disappearing forests

(04/26/2005) Borneo, the third largest island in the world, was once covered with dense rainforests. With swampy coastal areas fringed with mangrove forests and a mountainous interior, much of the terrain was virtually impassable and unexplored. Headhunters ruled the remote parts of the island until a century ago.


New media resource on the wildlife of Madagscar

(04/25/2005) WildMadagascar.org, a leading information site on Madagascar, today announced the availability of PDF documents on the wildlife of Madagascar. The colorful "Wildlife of Madagascar" PDF is available free of charge on the site's media section.


Shamans and Robots: Bridging the Past and Future of Ethnobotany and Bioprospecting

(04/25/2005) A look at trends in ethnobotany and bioprospecting in seeking new ways to address human health conditions.


Down a river of blood into a remote canyon in Madagascar: Exploring the Manambolo River

(04/24/2005) Madagascar has been called the great red island and from space, astronauts have remarked the island looks like it is bleeding to death. Severe environmental degradation means Madagascar loses more topsoil per hectare than any country in the world. Being one of the poorest nations on Earth, the people of Madagascar can ill afford this loss. In 2004 I set off to see one of these rivers that is carrying away the lifeblood of the Malagasy; the Manambolo of Western Madagascar.


Amazon rain forest continues to fall; 200,000 square miles gone since 1978

(04/24/2005) Forest loss may worsen as Brazil seeks to expand agricultural production and fires threaten stressed ecosystem.


Drought, fire called biggest threats to Amazon rainforest ecosystem

(04/23/2005) A prolonged drought in the Amazon could lead to a massive die-off in the world's largest rainforest according to a study released in Science last week.


Farmers and landless poor battle over the Amazon

(04/22/2005) Land battles in Brazil's countryside reached the highest level in at least 20 years in 2004 as activists clashed with farmers and loggers advancing on savanna and Amazon rain forest, a nongovernmental group said Tuesday.


Honduran priest recognized as environmental hero with $125,000 award

(04/22/2005) On April 18th, 2005, Father José Andrés Tamayo Cortez was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize. The Prize recognizes individuals for sustained and significant efforts to preserve and enhance the natural environment, often at great personal risk. Each winner receives an award of $125,000, the largest of its kind.


Freshwater aquarium fish under threat in the wild

(04/22/2005) Some of those fish you see swimming around the tanks at your local fish store are rarer than you might think. The natural habitats of tropical freshwater fish are increasingly threatened by human activities, and while at times the hobby has been been at odds with conservation, the role of aquariasts in preserving species is growing in importance.


Is Earth Day a waste of time?

(04/22/2005) So today is Earth Day.  You may look at Earth Day as another useless "holiday" that appears on your calendar, yet does not warrant an actual vacation day, where people parade around about trees or not driving, CEOs stand up to talk about their environmental stewardship as a PR strategy and Hallmark, ironically, sells more cards. Another gimmick day full of false promises and empty pledges to make real environmentally-motivated change, while everything remains regretfully the same. Well, perhaps this Earth Day you should pause for a little reflection. Step back, watch the kids dressed up as butterflies and trees dancing in your city park or main street while adults drink their organic wine and eco-friendly microbrewed beers, and think about what you can and will honestly do to reduce the weight of your impact on the world around you.  Maybe you will make more of an effort to recycle those bottles and cans that sometimes end up in your trash or actually take the time to cut those six pack plastic rings, because you have seen those pictures of sea creatures, and it hurt you to look at them.


Studying the rainforest canopy

(04/21/2005) The Global Canopy Programme, a groundbreaking new project dedicated to studying rainforest canopies, is about to enter the implementation stage in five tropical forests across the globe. Headed by Dr. Andrew Mitchell of Oxford University, the project will place giant cranes in Brazil, Ghana, India, Madagascar and Malaysia


Okapi, other wildlife saved in the Congo by forest protector

(04/21/2005) Corneille Ewango of the Wildlife conservation Society today received the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize for risking his life helping to protect one of Africa's environmental gems—the Okapi Faunal Reserve—from the depredations of rebel militias in the wartorn region of the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.


Borneo's peat lands going up in smoke

(04/21/2005) The tropical rainforests of Kalimantan have long been threatened and increasingly endangered by deforestation and other invasive types of human activity. However, a lesser known ecosystem in the region that is literally coming under fire, is the tropical peat lands, particularly in the central area of the province of Indonesian Borneo


Timber hungry China moves into Africa

(04/20/2005) With its projected growth rates, China will soon surpass the United States in wood consumption. This voracious appetite for timber is threatening tropical forests around the globe but nowhere is this more apparent than in Africa where China is increasingly focusing its development efforts and adding fuel to a booming trade in illegally harvested timber.


Bioprospecting in Panama

(04/20/2005) Coiba, an island 12 miles off the coast of Panama and once a notorious penal colony, may be hiding big secrets in its reefs, among them, a possible cure for malaria.


Are rainforests still worth saving?

(04/20/2005) Rainforests around the world still continue to fall. Does it really make a difference?


Another look at global rainforest conservation

(04/19/2005) With Earth Day approaching it is appropriate to take another look at conservation efforts in the world's tropical rainforests, which today are disappearing from the face of the globe. Despite growing international concern, rainforests continue to be destroyed at a pace exceeding 80,000 acres (32,000 hectares) per day. So, what should be done?


Madagascar looks toward a brighter economic future with movie, new aid package

(04/18/2005) While the planet's most biologically diverse island is also one of the poorest countries in the world, Madagascar may well be on its way to a brighter economic future thanks to a blockbuster animated movie, an innovative new aid program, and the capable leadership of the new president.


The Next Costa Rica? Environmental activism takes root in Honduras

(04/18/2005) With its biodiversity, rich history, beautiful beaches, and stunning reefs, some believe Honduras could be the ecotourism hotspot in Central America. However, between growing gang violence linked to the drug trade in the United States and conflicts between developers and local communities, the country still faces many challenges in becoming the next Costa Rica. Special correspondent Tina Butler takes a look at changing attitudes about the environment in one of Central America's poorest countries.


Seeking the world's strangest primate on a tropical island paradise

(04/17/2005) Seeking the world's strangest primate on a tropical island paradise


Kalimantan at the Crossroads: Dipterocarp Forests and the Future of Indonesian Borneo

(04/17/2005) Kalimantan at the Crossroads: Dipterocarp Forests and the Future of Indonesian Borneo


Cane toads increasingly a problem in Australia

(04/17/2005) Cane toads increasingly a problem in Australia


Chinese economy drives road-building and deforestation in the Amazon

(04/17/2005) Chinese economy drives road-building and deforestation in the Amazon


Creating habitats for suburban wildlife in Florida

(04/17/2005) Creating habitats for suburban wildlife in Florida


Coral reefs survive tsunami relatively unscathed, report finds

(04/16/2005) Coral reefs survive tsunami relatively unscathed, report finds


Gulf dead zone may by increasing according to researchers

(04/15/2005) Gulf dead zone may by increasing according to researchers


Smoke from forest fires reduces rainfall and spells trouble for the Amazon rainforest

(04/14/2005) Smoke from forest fires reduces rainfall and spells trouble for the Amazon rainforest


Deforestation in Borneo

(04/13/2005) Deforestation in Borneo


Making nanotechnology waste environmentally friendly

(04/11/2005) Making nanotechnology waste environmentally friendly


Measuring the economic costs of environmental degradation

(04/09/2005) Measuring the economic costs of environmental degradation


25 percent of the world's 625 primate species at risk of extinction

(04/07/2005) 25 percent of the world's 625 primate species at risk of extinction


Madagascar to takes action against illegal logging

(04/05/2005) Madagascar to takes action against illegal logging


Poachers kill flagship tiger for conservation efforts in Russia

(04/04/2005) Poachers kill flagship tiger for conservation efforts in Russia


Coca cultivation in the rainforests of Colombia

(04/03/2005) Coca cultivation in the rainforests of Colombia


Bridging the Great Divide: Hollywood Versus the Avant-garde

(04/02/2005) Fritz Lang's films M and Scarlet Street illuminate the gaping, yet often blurred division between high avant-garde art and low, appropriated imitation by mass culture. Lang's two films, when juxtaposed, begin to engage in a dialogue about the cultural position of each of the two forms--one, a typical European art film, and the other, an production of the Hollywood school.


The Counterfeit Body: Fashion Photography and the Deceptions of Femininity, Sexuality, Authenticity and Self in the 1950s, 60s and 70s

(04/02/2005) The Counterfeit Body: Fashion Photography and the Deceptions of Femininity, Sexuality, Authenticity and Self in the 1950s, 60s and 70s


Brutality in Sexuality: The Newtonization of Fashion Photography in the 1970s

(04/02/2005) Brutality in Sexuality: The Newtonization of Fashion Photography in the 1970s


Thomas and Verushka: Sexualized Elements of Swinging 60s London

(04/02/2005) Thomas and Verushka: Sexualized Elements of Swinging 60s London


The Age of Sex: Bad Boys and the Sexualized Body in 1960s Fashion Photography

(04/02/2005) The Age of Sex: Bad Boys and the Sexualized Body in 1960s Fashion Photography


The Teacher and the Student: Innocence, Exploration, and Redefinition in the 1950s World of Fashion

(04/02/2005) The Teacher and the Student: Innocence, Exploration, and Redefinition in the 1950s World of Fashion


Interrupting the Age of Innocence: Fashion Photography in the 1950s

(04/02/2005) Interrupting the Age of Innocence: Fashion Photography in the 1950s


Fashion Photography as Semiotics: Barthes and the Limitations of Classification

(04/02/2005) Fashion Photography as Semiotics: Barthes and the Limitations of Classification


For Whose Eyes?: The Politics, Persuasions and Perversions of the Gendered Gaze

(04/02/2005) For Whose Eyes?: The Politics, Persuasions and Perversions of the Gendered Gaze


The Methods of Madness: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Awakenings

(04/02/2005) The Methods of Madness: Representations of Inmates, Authorities and the Asylum in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Awakenings .


Seven's Failure to Surmount Mass Culture

(04/02/2005) Non-place is Still Someplace: Seven's Failure to Surmount Mass Culture.


America's Cinematic Deadly Obsession

(04/02/2005) In Sickness and in Health: America's Cinematic Deadly Obsession.


Souvenirs and the Museum Store: Icons of Culture and Status to Go

(04/02/2005) Souvenirs and the Museum Store: Icons of Culture and Status to Go.


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