Photo: Mystery 'alien-beast' in Panama is likely a sloth

mongabay.com
September 19, 2009



The 'mystery alien-beast' discovered by four teens in Panama and widely reported in the media over the past few days is likely a deformed sloth.

A week ago four teens playing near a creek in Cerro Azul, a community in the northern part of Panama City, encountered the creature, which they claim approached them. The teens threw rocks and beat the animal to death before returning to take pictures. The photos reveal a white hairless creature with clawed toes. Other than its lack of fur, the animal closely resembles a three-toed sloth, a mammal found widely in the Central American country.

alien-beast
Mystery beast in Panama. Image from Telemetro.
alien-beast
Living sloth
Nevertheless the local media has played up the story, reporting that zoologists are unable to identify the "alien-like" creature. But DNA testing should soon confirm what most are saying: the animal is a sloth.

As a consequence of a slow news cycle towards the end of summer, August and September tend to be peak months for sightings of "strange" and "unidentified" creatures including unusual marine life, malformed animals and the mythological beasts like the Chupacabra, the Mongolian Death Worm, Big Foot, and the Loch Ness Monster.

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CITATION:
mongabay.com (September 19, 2009).

Photo: Mystery 'alien-beast' in Panama is likely a sloth.

http://news.mongabay.com/2009/0919-beast.html