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Audio: How to be an ethical wildlife photographer, and why it’s necessary

  • On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we discuss how to take photographs of wild animals without harassing, exploiting, or harming them — in other words, today we’re taking a look at ethical wildlife photography.
  • We welcome to the program environmental journalist Annie Roth and internationally renowned, award-winning wildlife photographer Suzi Eszterhas.
  • Ethical wildlife photography is “kind of a win-win,” Eszterhas says, “because, number one, we’re treating the animals with kindness and respect and we’re not affecting their lives in a very negative way. And number two, we’re getting very unique gifts out of it, we’re getting these incredible images that we wouldn’t be able to get without it.”

On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we discuss how to take photographs of wild animals without harassing, exploiting, or harming them — in other words, today we’re taking a look at ethical wildlife photography.

Listen here:

 

To help us explore how to be an ethical wildlife photographer and why it’s necessary, we welcome environmental journalist Annie Roth, who recently wrote an in-depth article for Hakai Magazine exploring how wildlife pay the price when humans get too close in order to snap a few pics that they hope will score them likes on social media. We also speak with internationally renowned, award-winning wildlife photographer Suzi Eszterhas about her own experiences in the field, her specialization in taking photos of baby animals, and why she says patience is perhaps the most important best practice — not just for photographing wildlife in an ethical manner, but for capturing the most unique and compelling images.

Ethical wildlife photography is “kind of a win-win,” Eszterhas says, “because, number one, we’re treating the animals with kindness and respect and we’re not affecting their lives in a very negative way. And number two, we’re getting very unique gifts out of it, we’re getting these incredible images that we wouldn’t be able to get without it.”

Six-week-old black-backed jackal pups (Canis mesomelas) peek out of their den at sunset in the Masai Mara Reserve in Kenya. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.
Six-week-old tiger cub (Panthera tigris) in den in Bandhavgarh National Park, India. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.

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You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.

Hoffman’s two-toed sloth hanging with baby in Costa Rica. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.
Leopardess (Panthera pardus) grooming five-week-old cub in the Jao Reserve in Botswana’s Okavango Delta. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.

Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001
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