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Featured video: What would you change in conservation?

What would you change in conservation? It’s a simple question, but like so many simple quandaries it’s bound to elicit a wide diversity of answers. Recently, a pair of students in the MSc Conservation Science program at Imperial College London—Vikki Lang and Xuchang Liang—posed this question to their fellow students, recording a fascinating string of ideas about the future of conservation.



“We were trying to focus [on] the topic of ‘change’ as the 36 students on our Masters were about to embark on our six month projects, and all aspire to make some positive changes to the world around us over the course of our careers!” Vikki Lang told mongabay.com.



For Xichang Liang, the participants’ answers weren’t as important as the “constructive involvement.”














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