New $20,000 reporting grant explores benefits of Amazonian protected areas

mongabay.org
February 21, 2014



Mongabay.org announces new $20,000 environmental reporting grant: Amazonian protected areas: benefits for people

With six Special Reporting Initiatives (SRI) already under way, Mongabay.org is excited to announce a call for applications for its latest journalism grant topic: Amazonian protected areas: benefits for people.

The Amazon’s system of protected areas has grown exponentially in the past 25 years. In many South American nations, the mission of protected areas has expanded from biodiversity conservation to improving human welfare. However, given the multiple purposes and diverse management of many protected areas, it is often difficult to measure their effect on human populations. This Special Reporting Initiative (SRI) will ask: what are the true effects of Amazonian protected areas on people, both locally and globally?

Cloud forest in the Peruvian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / mongabay.comCloud forest in the Peruvian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / mongabay.com

Mongabay.org will commit up to $20,000 to fund the top proposal: $15,000 as a stipend and up to $5,000 for reporting and travel costs. The fellow, who will be selected by an independent panel that consists of six journalists and issue-area experts, will have three months for travel and research and three months for writing. The selected fellow can then work from anywhere in the world.

The Application Deadline for this SRI is April 18th, 2014. Learn more about how to apply here.

Mongabay.org’s SRI program enables professional journalists to conduct in-depth reporting on a specific issue over a three-month period. The resulting articles will be published on Mongabay under a Creative Commons license that allows for, and encourages, re-publishing elsewhere.

The value of the Special Reporting Initiatives program is that it enables high-quality and detailed reporting on an environmental issue that may be otherwise overlooked or underreported by the broader media. In contrast to an aggregation of case studies in a single report, a series of in-depth articles highlights each case study or story separately, boosting its prominence. SRI fellows are given the funding and support to become issue area experts, adding value to their own career and contributing to the wider conversation regarding the state of our natural world.

Mongabay.org expects to announce a new SRI every few months. You can sign up here to receive an email each time a new opportunity opens.

Future SRIs* May Include:
  • Food waste and spoilage in Africa
  • Effectiveness of certification / commodity roundtables
  • Renewable energy in India
  • Financing dams in the Amazon
  • Great apes and the wildlife trade
For more information about this SRI, the Special Reporting Initiatives program, or on how to apply, please visit the SRI homepage.

CAPTION
A frog species captured on camera in the Tambopata National Reserve. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / mongabay.com

* The SRIs on the list above are all tentative and subject to change.















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CITATION:
mongabay.org (February 21, 2014).

New $20,000 reporting grant explores benefits of Amazonian protected areas.

http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0221-sri-amazonian-protected-areas.html