Conservation scientists: Aceh's spatial plan a risk to forests, wildlife, and people

Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com
March 22, 2013



A group of biologists and conservation scientists meeting in Sumatra warned that potential changes to Aceh's spatial plan could undermine some of the ecological services that underpin the Indonesian province's economy and well-being of its citizens.

After its meeting from March 18-22 in Banda Aceh, the Asia chapter of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) issued a declaration [PDF] highlighting the importance of the region's tropical forest ecosystem, which is potentially at risk due to proposed changes to its spatial plan or system of land-use zoning. Under the new spatial plan, more than 150,000 hectares of previously protected forest land would be given over for logging and conversion to plantations. Nearly a million hectares of mining exploration licenses would be granted.

Lowland rice paddies just outside Banda Aceh.
Lowland rice paddies just outside Banda Aceh. Photo by Rhett A. Butler

One concern is that some concessions are located in steep watersheds that sustain lowland rice production. Another worry, highlighted by environmental groups, is that substantial blocks of surviving lowland habitats for orangutans would be put up for logging and oil palm plantations, putting the critically endangered species at increased risk. Aceh is one the only place on Earth where orangutans, rhinos, tigers, and elephants can be found living in the same forest.

The ATBC resolution notes some of these concerns.

"Aceh forests are essential for food security, regulating water flows in both the monsoon and drought seasons to irrigate rice fields and other cash crops," states the declaration. "Forest disruption in Aceh’s upland areas will increase the risk of destructive flooding for people living downstream in the coastal lowlands."

Rainforest river near Jantho, Aceh.
Rainforest river near Jantho, Aceh. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

ATBC says that the proposed spatial plan "will elevate the risk of serious local environmental problems, a loss of key nature hydrological functions, and serious disruption of lowland river systems and fisheries, which could negatively affect human livelihoods and biodiversity."

It adds that "further conversion of lowland forest will increase conflicts between people and surviving wild elephants, posing a significant threat to farming livelihoods."

The group, which is the largest association of tropical conservation scientists, therefore recommended that Aceh's spatial plan "be based on the extensive, high-quality spatial data that are available within the Government of Aceh agencies, especially maps on watershed forest areas, environmental risk, soil types, geological hazards, human population centers, rainfall and the distribution of Aceh’s wildlife."

It also called for action against illegal logging, forest conservation, and road construction. ATBC-Asia urged the Aceh government to adopt an economic development model that "prioritizes clean development and payments for environmental services, while limiting unsustainable natural resource extraction."

Rainforest tree fern near Jantho, Aceh.
Rainforest tree fern near Jantho, Aceh. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

Aceh has the most extensive forest cover of any province in Sumatra. It has had a moratorium on logging since 2007, although the new spatial plan would effectively end the logging ban.



















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CITATION:
Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com (March 22, 2013).

Conservation scientists: Aceh's spatial plan a risk to forests, wildlife, and people.

http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0322-atbc-aceh-declaration.html