Malaysian candidate pledges to drop controversial dam in Sarawak if elected

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
January 14, 2013



Malaysia's current opposition leader, Anwar Ibrahim, has pledged to cancel the controversial Baram Dam in Sarawak if upcoming general elections sweep him into the office of Prime Minister. Ibrahim made the announcement while visiting the state of Sarawak, located on the island of Borneo, over the weekend, according to the indigenous rights NGO, Bruno Manser Fund.

The Baram dam is one of several mega-dams that have led to large-scale protests and even construction occupations in the rainforests of Sarawak. It's estimated that the Baram dam would force the removal of 20,000 indigenous people and flood 40,000 hectares of primary rainforest.

If elected, Ibrahim's pledge to stop supporting the project would effectively cripple it, according to the Bruno Manser Fund.

"It is highly unlikely that Sarawak will be able to proceed with the dam constructions without the financial and political support from the federal government," the NGO said in an e-mail.

The Baram Dam is expected to produce 1,200 megawatts. But the recently built Bakun Dam (2,400 megawatts) already produces twice the power consumed by Sarawak during peak times. Another dam, the 900 megawatt Murum dam, is currently under construction, although it has faced delays due to indigenous occupations. Critics contend that the massive dam projects are being used by corrupt politicians to pocket government funds.

Ibrahim has crafted a three-party coalition in opposition against current Prime Minister Najib Razak, whose party Barisan Nasional has been in power in Malaysia since 1963.













Related articles

Penan suspend dam blockade, give government one month to respond to demands

(11/15/2012) Members of the Penan tribe have suspended their month long blockade of the Murum dam in the Malaysian state of Sarawak, reports Survival International. However, according to the indigenous group the fight is not over: the departing Penan said the Sarawak government had one month to respond to demands for sufficient compensation for the dam's impact or face another blockade. Over 300 Penan people participated in the blockade, which stopped traffic leading to the construction site.


Indigenous blockade expands against massive dam in Sarawak

(10/08/2012) Indigenous people have expanded their blockade against the Murum dam in the Malaysian state of Sarawak, taking over an additional road to prevent construction materials from reaching the dam site. Beginning on September 26th with 200 Penan people, the blockade has boomed to well over 300. Groups now occupy not just the main route to the dam site, but an alternative route that the dam's contractor, the China-located Three Gorges Project Corporation, had begun to use.


NGO: Malaysian leader worth $15 billion despite civil-servant salary; timber corruption suspected

(09/19/2012) Abdul Taib Mahmud, who has headed the Malaysian state of Sarawak for over 30 years, is worth $15 billion according to a new report by the Bruno Manser Fund. The report, The Taib Timber Mafia, alleges that Taib has used his position as head-of-state to build up incredible amounts of wealth by employing his family or political nominees to run the state's logging, agriculture, and construction businesses. Some environmental groups claim that Sarawak has lost 90 percent of its primary forests to logging, while indigenous tribes in the state have faced the destruction of their forests, harassment, and eviction.


Sarawak tribe calls on German company to walk away from controversial dam

(06/19/2012) Indigenous people from the Malaysian state of Sarawak have sent a letter to the German company, Fichtner GmbH & Co. KG, demanding that the consulting group halt all activities related to the hugely-controversial Baram dam, reports the NGO Bruno Manser Fund. Critics of the dam and it parent project known as the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE) initiative, say the hydroelectric dam will displace 20,000 people and flood 40,000 hectares of primary rainforest.


Mining cancellation throws wrench into Sarawak dam-building spree

(03/27/2012) The world's third largest mining company, Rio Tinto, and a local financial and construction firm, Cahya Mata Sarawak (CMS), have cancelled plans for a $2 billion aluminum smelter to be constructed in the Malaysian state of Sarawak. The cancellation calls into question Sarawak's plan to build a dozen massive dams—known as the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE) initiative—that were proposed, in part, to provide power to the massive aluminum smelter. However, the mega-dam proposal has been heavily criticized for its impact on Sarawak's rivers, rainforest and indigenous people.







CITATION:
Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com (January 14, 2013).

Malaysian candidate pledges to drop controversial dam in Sarawak if elected .

http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0114-hance-baram-dam-anwar.html