App designed to fight wildlife crime in Cambodia

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
May 08, 2012



Wild birds and fish on sale in open-air market in Laos. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Wild birds and fish on sale in open-air market in Laos. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Conservation NGO Wildlife Alliance has launched a new iPhone app that not only teaches users about Cambodian wildlife but also gives them information on how to help the group fight pervasive wildlife crime in the country. The app includes photos and information regarding species imperiled by the wildlife trade as well as informational videos with Jeff Corwin from the Animal Planet.

According to a press releases from Wildlife Alliance, the app "gives users the opportunity to join in the fight to stop the illegal wildlife trade through incident reports that are sent directly to our Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team. The team can then take immediate action to stop traffickers and sellers of wildlife and wildlife parts." Dubbed Wildlife Watch, the app also includes local names for species as well as how to link wildlife parts to species.

The illegal wildlife trade is a major problem in Cambodia and across much of Asia. Endangered species are often sold in open markets for food, medicine, or pets.

The Wildlife Alliance app was developed with partnerships with Trigger LLC, Jeff Corwin Connect, and wildlife trade NGO, TRAFFIC.













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CITATION:
Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com (May 08, 2012).

App designed to fight wildlife crime in Cambodia.

http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0508-hance-cambodia-app.html