Jane Goodall and David Attenborough: overpopulation must be addressed

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
December 06, 2010



In a recent interview with The Telegraph world famous primatologist and conservationist, Jane Goodall, and wildlife documentarian Sir David Attenborough agreed that overpopulation must be addressed to protect the global environment.

"There are three times as many people on earth as when I first started making television programs all of whom require food and a place to live. And many of us, including me, take more than our fair share. And while the answer is unclear, one thing is obvious: where women are educated and have the vote, birth rates drop," Attenborough told The Telegraph.

Both Attenborough and Goodall are patrons of the Optimum Population Trust , a UK organization devoted to addressing global population as a way to combat the world's environmental crises.

"It's our population growth that underlies just about every single one of the problems that we've inflicted on the planet," Goodall told the AFP this spring. "If there were just a few of us, then the nasty things we do wouldn't really matter and Mother Nature would take care of it—but there are so many of us."







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CITATION:
Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com (December 06, 2010).

Jane Goodall and David Attenborough: overpopulation must be addressed.

http://news.mongabay.com/2010/1205-hance_goodall_attenborough.html