Record hunger: one billion people are going hungry worldwide

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
June 22, 2009





A new estimate by the UN FAO estimates that one billion people are currently going hungry: the highest number in history. Largely exacerbated by the global economic crisis, the number of the world’s hungry has risen by 100 million people.

The economic crisis has led to more hunger due to lower wages and layoffs worldwide. In addition, food prices still remain high after the food crisis that began in 2006: food prices remain 33 percent higher today than in 2005.

"A dangerous mix of the global economic slowdown combined with stubbornly high food prices in many countries has pushed some 100 million more people than last year into chronic hunger and poverty," said FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf. "The silent hunger crisis — affecting one sixth of all of humanity — poses a serious risk for world peace and security. We urgently need to forge a broad consensus on the total and rapid eradication of hunger in the world and to take the necessary actions."

Hunger has been on the rise since the mid-1990s, according to FAO statistics.

FAO numbers are driven in part by analysis from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Economic Research Service (ERS).







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CITATION:
Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com (June 22, 2009).

Record hunger: one billion people are going hungry worldwide.

http://news.mongabay.com/2009/0621-hance_hunger.html