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Podcast: In the Amazon, women are key to forest conservation

  • Women are a driving force in the movement to protect the Amazon rainforest, the largest rainforest in the world.
  • Joining us on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast is environmental journalist Sarah Sax, who recently wrote about the Women Warriors of the Forest, an all-female Indigenous group that is employing new tactics and building new alliances to protect the forests they call home.
  • We also interview Dr. Dolors Armenteras, who is a pioneer in the use of remote sensing to monitor Amazon forests and biodiversity, and has been named one of the most influential scientists studying forest fires.
  • Despite her pedigree, Armenteras has faced discrimination as a woman scientist, and discusses how she is supporting the next generation of women scientists to help them overcome such biases.

On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we take a look at how women are leading the charge to protect the Amazon rainforest, the largest rainforest in the world.

Listen here:

 

Mongabay has published a number of stories lately focused on successful Amazonian conservation initiatives led by women, and we wanted to highlight some of those stories on the podcast today.

Joining us is Mongabay contributor Sarah Sax, who recently wrote about the Women Warriors of the Forest, an all-female indigenous group that is employing new tactics and building new alliances to protect the forests they call home. Sax joins us to discuss the Women Warriors and some of her other recent reporting that has centered women conservation leaders in the Amazon.

We’re also speak with Dr. Dolors Armenteras, who was the subject of a recent profile published on Mongabay. Armenteras is known as a pioneer in the use of remote sensing to monitor forests and biodiversity, and has been named one of the most influential scientists studying forest fires. We discuss her work, the discrimination she has faced as a woman scientist, and how she is supporting the next generation of women scientists to help them overcome gender bias in science.

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Indigenous women played a prominent role in the protests at the 2019 Free Land Encampment in Brasilia, and they say they will play an even bigger role in the future. Image by Karla Mendes / Mongabay.

Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001

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