Conservation news

Audio: Frances Seymour on why rich nations need to start paying up to protect the world’s tropical forests

On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Frances Seymour, a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the World Resources Institute in Washington, D.C. and the lead author of a new book titled Why Forests? Why Now? The Science, Economics and Politics of Tropical Forests and Climate Change, which she co-authored with Jonah Busch.

Seymour shares her thoughts on why now is such an opportune moment for the publication of the book, whether or not the large-scale investment necessary to protect the world’s tropical forests shows signs of materializing any time soon, and which countries are leading the forest conservation charge.

We also welcome Mongabay editor Glenn Scherer back to the program to answer a question from Newscast listener Brian Platt about which ‘good news’ stories are worth talking about more in these tough times for environmental and conservation news.

Here’s this episode’s top news:

Want to help spread the top news or the happy, upbeat stories featured on today’s episode? Mongabay publishes most of its features on a Creative Commons 4.0 License, so that anyone can use our original reporting in their own publication or website for free and without prior permission. That’s why you’ll see our features appear in outlets like The Guardian. For information about using Mongabay stories, visit mongabay.com/copyright.

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Photo by Rhett Butler.

Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001

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