Conservation news

Illegal loggers make a fortune; American forestry companies attempt to fight back




Illegal loggers make a fortune; American forestry companies fight back


Illegal loggers make a fortune
American forestry companies attempt to fight back
mongabay.com
May 5, 2005

A new report published by Seneca Creek Associates and Wood Resources Institute, says that illegal logging hurts legitimate timber operators by driving down market prices for wood and tarnishing the industry’s reputation through shady dealings with corrupt regimes. While maximizing their harvest without regard for regulations or the long-term impact of their activities, these illicit operators reduce their costs through the use of well-placed bribes to avoid taxes and royalties.

The paper, “Illegal Logging and Global Wood Markets: The Competitive Impacts on the U.S. Wood Products Industry,” is sponsored by the American Forest and Paper Association (AF&PA) and looks at “illegal logging in Brazil, Central and West Africa, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Russia and at suspicious forest product imports into China, Europe, and Japan” according The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). CIFOR is an international research and global knowledge institution committed to conserving forests and improving the livelihoods of people in the tropics.

In their summary of the paper, CIFOR notes the authors’ conclusions:

Illegally-harvested timber cuts into the profits of American forestry companies. The aim of the “Illegal Logging and Global Wood Markets” paper is to encourage governments to enforce local laws and slow the illegal trade in timber.

You can learn more about the paper and see CIFOR’s summary of the paper at http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/docs/_ref/aboutcifor/index.htm

This report used information from The Center for International Forestry Research‘s web site and press release.