tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/politics1 politics news from mongabay.com 2014-04-08T19:40:37Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13012 2014-03-31T17:37:00Z 2014-04-08T19:40:37Z Apocalypse now? Climate change already damaging agriculture, acidifying seas, and worsening extreme weather <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0331.Tacloban_Typhoon_Haiyan_2013-11-14.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>It's not just melting glaciers and bizarrely-early Springs anymore; climate change is impacting every facet of human civilization from our ability to grow enough crops to our ability to get along with each other, according to a new 2,300-page report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The massive report states definitively that climate change is already affecting human societies on every continent. Jeremy Hance 35.463838 139.619164 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12982 2014-03-25T19:43:00Z 2014-03-25T20:42:19Z Europe approves vet drug that killed off almost all of Asia's vultures <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0325.cinereous_vulture-01.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>When Europeans first arrived in North America, they exterminated three to five billion passenger pigeons (<i>Ectopistes migratorius</i>) in the short span of a century through a combination of habitat destruction and hunting. In 1914, the last living passenger pigeon perished at the Cincinnati Zoo. Despite the staggering scale of this extinction event, three species of vulture from Southeastern Asia retain the dubious distinction of having had the most rapid population crash of any avian fauna. They might not have begun with numbers as large as the passenger pigeon, but within the space of a single decade, their populations were reduced by 96 to 99 percent. Jeremy Hance 25.365863 78.632792 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12938 2014-03-16T21:14:00Z 2014-03-19T03:09:26Z Controversial Amazon dams may have exacerbated biblical flooding <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0319bolivia-flood150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Environmentalists and scientists raised howls of protest when the Santo Antônio and Jirau Dams were proposed for the Western Amazon in Brazil, claiming among other issues that the dams would raise water levels on the Madeira River, potentially leading to catastrophic flooding. It turns out they may have been right: last week a federal Brazilian court ordered a new environmental impact study on the dams given suspicion that they have worsened recent flooding in Brazil and across the border in Bolivia. Jeremy Hance 9.1600 64.3857 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12924 2014-03-13T15:56:00Z 2014-03-13T16:05:18Z Europe votes for an Arctic Sanctuary Yesterday, the European Parliament passed a resolution supporting the creation of an Arctic Sanctuary covering the vast high Arctic around the North Pole, giving official status to an idea that has been pushed by activists for years. Still, the sanctuary has a long road to go before becoming a reality: as Arctic sea ice rapidly declines due to climate change, there has been rising interest from governments and industries to exploit the once inaccessible wilderness for fish and fossil fuels. Jeremy Hance 82.452125 -173.416326 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12862 2014-03-03T14:52:00Z 2014-03-03T15:05:04Z The real cost of conservation: cheap protection rarely succeeds <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/peru/150/wayquecha-andes_0245.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Conservation efforts in less-developed and politically unstable countries are full of risk, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. The study, which looks at how to best evaluate conservation priorities, argues that selecting priority countries based solely on economic factors may lead to failure in conservation projects and increase the likelihood of negative impacts on local people. Tiffany Roufs 13.852909 -7.265242 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12695 2014-01-28T15:59:00Z 2014-01-28T16:32:18Z Over 2,500 wolves killed in U.S.'s lower 48 since 2011 Hunters and trappers have killed 2,567 gray wolves in the U.S.'s lower 48 states since 2011, according to recent data. Gray wolves (<i>Canis lupus</i>) were protected by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for nearly 40 years before being stripped of their protection status by a legislative rider in 2011. Last year total wolf populations were estimated at over 6,000 in the region. Jeremy Hance 44.510218 -110.611954 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12540 2013-12-19T15:01:00Z 2013-12-27T03:54:13Z Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2013 <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1101olinguito.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>China begins to tackle pollution, carbon emissions: As China's environmental crisis worsens, the government has begun to unveil a series of new initiatives to curb record pollution and cut greenhouse emissions. The world's largest consumer of coal, China's growth in emissions is finally slowing and some experts believe the nation's emissions could peak within the decade. If China's emissions begin to fall, so too could the world's. Jeremy Hance 39.906576 116.413665 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12493 2013-12-09T14:07:00Z 2013-12-09T14:48:11Z Making cap-and-trade work: the history and future of a proven program <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1209.800px-Gavin_Plant.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>While the merits for slowing climate change will be treated here as a given, the method for doing so looms elusive. In a recent article, I described pricing carbon through carbon taxes and carbon credits as a way to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and slow global climate change. As there has been some emotive controversy towards both of these, I would like to analyze them more deeply, starting here with carbon credits. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12490 2013-12-05T18:14:00Z 2013-12-05T18:31:58Z Top scientists propose ambitious plans to safeguard world from devastating climate change <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/kauai_1097.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Two degrees is too much: that's the conclusion of a landmark new paper by top economists and climatologists, including James Hansen formerly of NASA. The paper, appearing in the open-access journal PLoS ONE, argues that global society must aim for only one degree Celsius of warming above pre-industrial levels to avoid the worst impact of climate change, and not the two degrees Celsius agreed on by the world's governments. But given that the world's governments are not yet on track to even achieve the two degree target, how could we lock in just one? A combination of renewable energy, nuclear power, and, most importantly, a rising price on carbon emissions, according to the eighteen scientists. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12429 2013-11-21T17:05:00Z 2013-11-21T17:53:55Z Citizen groups walk out of UN Climate Summit to protest lack of ambition Thirteen citizen groups&#8212;including Oxfam, Greenpeace, and WWF&#8212;have walked out of ongoing climate talks in Warsaw to protest what they view as a lack of ambition and long-stalled progress on combating global climate change. Nearly 200 governments are currently meeting in Warsaw, Poland at the the 19th Conference of the Parties (COP) for the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which is meant to prepare the way for a new agreement in 2015. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12412 2013-11-19T19:41:00Z 2013-11-19T20:04:02Z UN talks tough to global coal industry <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0613.800px-Kompalniaielektrownia.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Yesterday, at the International Coal and Climate Summit&#8212;just a couple miles from the ongoing UN Climate Summit&#8212;Christiana Figueres delivered a speech unlike anything ever heard at a coal industry meeting before. Figueres, the Executive Director of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), took time off from wrangling world leaders and officials toward a climate agreement to talk tough to an industry currently worth around $3 trillion. Jeremy Hance 52.266319 21.066184 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12395 2013-11-18T14:41:00Z 2013-11-18T17:35:40Z Japan pledges to raise carbon emissions, instead of cutting them In 2009, Japan pledged to cut its carbon emissions by 25 percent based on 1990 levels within 11 years. Four years later&#8212;including a nuclear meltdown at Fukushima&#8212;and Japan has reset its goal with a new target to cut emissions by 3.8 percent based on 2005 levels at the UN Climate Summit in Warsaw, Poland. But, the new target, which received widespread condemnation when announced on Friday, actually results in a 3.1 percent <i>rise</i> in emissions when viewed from the widely-accepted 1990 baseline. Jeremy Hance 35.689649 139.777565 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12345 2013-11-11T15:59:00Z 2013-11-18T21:06:09Z Bangladesh plans massive coal plant in world's biggest mangrove forest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1110.Sundarbans_MM7666_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>On October 22nd Bangladeshi and Indian officials were supposed to hold a ceremony laying the foundation stone for the Rampal power plant, a massive new coal-fired plant that will sit on the edge of the Sundarbans, the world's largest mangrove forest. However, the governments suddenly cancelled the ceremony, instead announcing that the project had already been inaugurated in early October by the countries' heads of state via a less-ornate Skype call. While the governments say the change was made because of busy schedules, activists contend the sudden scuttling of the ceremony was more likely due to rising pressure against the coal plant, including a five-day march in September that attracted thousands. Jeremy Hance 22.648235 89.651756 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12171 2013-10-07T13:39:00Z 2013-10-07T13:52:43Z Russia charges non-violent activists with 'piracy' for protesting Arctic oil drilling In what is being described by Greenpeace as an 'imaginary offense,' Russia has charged 30 people with piracy after activists protested against oil exploitation in the Arctic. The 30 charged included not only protestors, but a British journalist and Russian videographer who were on board Greenpeace's ship, the Arctic Sunrise, when it was stormed by the Russian military late last month. Jeremy Hance 68.94458 33.074112 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12167 2013-10-04T14:39:00Z 2013-10-04T14:58:08Z Myanmar faces new conservation challenges as it opens up to the world <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://places.mongabay.com/burma/fishing2-th.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>For decades, one of Southeast Asia's largest countries has also been its most mysterious. Now, emerging from years of political and economic isolation, its shift towards democracy means that Myanmar is opening up to the rest of the world. Myanmar forms part of the Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot, and some of the largest tracts of intact habitat in the hotspot can be found here. Tiffany Roufs 19.890723 96.137694 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12159 2013-10-03T15:13:00Z 2014-02-22T01:57:19Z Over 100 scientists warn Ecuadorian Congress against oil development in Yasuni <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/jlh/ecuador/Yasuni.150/Yasuni_22.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Over 100 scientists have issued a statement to the Ecuadorian Congress warning that proposed oil development and accompanying roads in Yasuni National Park will degrade its "extraordinary biodiversity." The statement by a group dubbed the Scientists Concerned for Yasuni outlines in detail how the park is not only likely the most biodiverse ecosystems in the western hemisphere, but in the entire world. Despite this, the Ecuadorian government has recently given the go-ahead to plans to drill for oil in Yasuni's Ishpingo-Tambococha-Tiputini (ITT) blocs, one of most remote areas in the Amazon rainforest. Jeremy Hance -0.668091 -76.026192 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12145 2013-09-30T17:12:00Z 2014-02-22T02:07:18Z Has Brazil turned against its progressive environmental policies? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://travel.mongabay.com/brazil/150/brazil_0507.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Last year, Brazil rolled back crucial parts of its landmark Forestry Code, potentially opening vast tracts of forest for destruction; it is also moving ahead on a number of Amazon dams, including the infamous Belo Monte, despite international condemnation and conflict with indigenous people. Meanwhile, a new law under consideration proposes allowing large-scale mining in protected areas. Given this a new paper in mongabay.com's open access journal Tropical Conservation Science argues that Brazil has thrown off its once admired mantle of environmental legislation, imperiling hundreds of thousands of species in the most biodiverse country on Earth. Jeremy Hance -15.80001 -47.864525 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12130 2013-09-26T14:14:00Z 2013-09-26T14:34:50Z Global society must leave fossil fuels in the ground, unburnt, says top official World governments must get used to the idea of leaving fossil fuel reserves in the ground unexploited and unburned, one of the world's most senior diplomats has said, ahead of a landmark report on climate science to be unveiled this Friday by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The former Irish president and UN high commissioner for human rights, Mary Robinson, is to spearhead a new international push aimed at breaking the climate talks deadlock and silencing skeptics, with a group of senior diplomats and politicians from around the world. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12129 2013-09-26T02:43:00Z 2013-09-26T02:53:30Z Malaysia clearcutting forest reserves for timber and palm oil <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0925.perak.P7170360.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In July Bikam Permanent Forest Reserve in Malaysia's Perak state was degazetted, allowing the forest to be clearcut for an oil palm plantation. Only after the forest was lost, did the Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) announce that it had contained the last stands of keruing paya (Dipterocarpus coriaceus) on the Malay peninsula, a large hardwood tree that's classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. The species is now reportedly extinct in Malaysia, although may still be found in Indonesia. However, the degazettement of the 400-hectare Bikam Forest Reserve wasn't an abnormality, according to activists. Since 2009, over 9,000 hectares of Permanent Forest Reserves have been degazetted in northwestern state, wiping out not just trees, but undercutting protected mammals and birds while threatening watersheds. Jeremy Hance 5.140186 101.18866 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12127 2013-09-25T16:45:00Z 2013-09-25T17:00:27Z Climate change policy is just good economics For the majority of the new century, Americans have largely stopped caring about the environment. In that time, America has suffered 9/11, two of the nation's four longest wars, the deepest depression in 80 years, increased inequality, and incompetent or fractured leadership. There's been a lot on the public mind. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12100 2013-09-18T23:40:00Z 2013-09-18T23:47:48Z Zombie coal: Borneo resurrects controversial coal plant The Malaysian government is taking another look at building a hugely controversial coal-fired plant in the Bornean state of Sabah, a proposal that was thrown out in 2011 due to a large-scale grassroots movement. The 300 megawatt coal plant would have been built in Lahad Datu on the edge of a wildlife reserve and the state's renowned coral reefs. Reportedly, the government is now considering building the same plant only further south in Tawau, which also lies on the coast. Jeremy Hance 4.264246 117.933884 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12022 2013-09-05T15:05:00Z 2013-09-05T15:28:04Z Amendments to Indian legislation could pose a threat to wildlife research <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/0905india150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In the upcoming session of the Indian Parliament, MPs will debate whether researchers and poachers should be treated in the same manner for a breach of law. A new bill proposes to impose substantial penalties, including imprisonment, when researchers with permission to enter a forest area default in any way. At the same time, a poacher or a person in possession banned wildlife product is let off with a fine. Tiffany Roufs 28.648415 77.224045 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12020 2013-09-04T21:24:00Z 2013-09-15T15:20:58Z Tools against climate change: carbon tax and cap-and-trade Climate-conscious folk agree that atmospheric carbon concentration is a key greenhouse gas and a large factor in global climate change. However, there are discrepancies in the methods chosen to address the problem. Some say that carbon emissions should be banned. Some say fossil fuels should be priced. Others say that there are nuances within each. Which tools can we realistically use to mitigate climate change and the drastic effects it will have on our world? Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11942 2013-08-20T13:32:00Z 2013-09-15T15:21:26Z In defense of the financial industry: stocking up to end climate change On a cross-country bus trip through the American Midwest, I watch cool morning mist rise from patchwork fields. Between the fields stand groves of dark green mid-summer trees, I am reminded that this scene is in jeopardy. The region is cited for its vulnerability to desertification associated with climate change. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11715 2013-07-03T17:22:00Z 2013-07-03T17:45:25Z Influential British editor banned from Sarawak Clare Rewcastle Brown, the editor of Sarawak Report and Radio Free Sarawak, has been deported from Sarawak reports the Bruno Manser Fund. Both the Sarawak Report and Radio Free Sarawak are known for high-profile and investigative journalism that is often critical of Sarawak's chief minister, Abdul Taib Mahmud or 'Taib', and his family for alleged corruption. Jeremy Hance 1.595558 110.329971 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11706 2013-07-02T16:24:00Z 2013-07-02T16:24:53Z In age of climate change, Australia's vast coal fields could become worthless Australia's huge coal industry is a speculative bubble ripe for financial implosion if the world's governments fulfill their agreement to act on climate change, according to a new report. The warning that much of the nation's coal reserves will become worthless as the world hits carbon emission limits comes after banking giant Citi also warned Australian investors that fossil fuel companies could do little to avoid the future loss of value. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11646 2013-06-26T03:21:00Z 2013-06-26T03:33:55Z Campaign contributions suggest dead-end for Congressional action on climate Sources of campaign contributions to members of Senate suggest Congress will be unlikely to take action on comprehensive climate legislation, indicates data collected by MapLight, a group that tracks money’s influence on politics. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11631 2013-06-23T17:10:00Z 2013-06-23T17:36:47Z Solving 'wicked problems': ten principles for improved environmental management <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://travel.mongabay.com/brazil/150/brazil_0225.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>As agriculture continues to expand at the expense of forests in the tropics, humanity struggles to meet environmental protection goals. Despite global efforts towards sustainable agriculture and some progress towards the gazetting of protected areas, there are as yet no general and effective solutions for meeting both conservation goals and food needs, and thus the loss and degradation of natural habitats continues. The Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) has estimated a 70% increase in food production will be needed by 2050 to feed a population that will exceed 9 billion. How can such food production be met in ways that conserve the environment while also alleviating poverty? Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11554 2013-06-06T17:18:00Z 2013-06-06T17:52:12Z Scientist: Australia taking 'calculated actions' to push Leadbeater's possum to extinction <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0606.404px-Leadbeater's_Possum_02_Pengo.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Australia's leading scientific expert on the endangered Leadbeater's possum has publicly lambasted the Victorian state government, claiming it is the first ever domestic administration to take "calculated actions" that it knew could wipe out a threatened species. In a letter published in the respected journal Science, Prof David Lindenmayer, of the Australian National University, states that "government-sanctioned legal logging of the reserve system will significantly increase the chance of extinction of Leadbeater’s possum." Jeremy Hance -37.514083 146.315002 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11544 2013-06-04T17:51:00Z 2013-06-04T17:55:44Z Canadian province cancels tar sands pipeline due to environmental impact Efforts to expand production from the Alberta tar sands suffered a significant setback on Friday when the provincial government of British Columbia rejected a pipeline project because of environmental shortcomings. In a strongly worded statement, the government of the province said it was not satisfied with the pipeline company's oil spill response plans. Jeremy Hance 57.562995 -126.877442 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11453 2013-05-20T12:27:00Z 2013-05-20T12:44:12Z Peru delays oil drilling in the Amazon to consult with indigenous peoples Peru has delayed auctioning off 27 oil blocs in the Amazon in order to conduct legally-required consultations with indigenous groups in the region, reports the Guardian. Perupetro S.A., Peru's state oil and gas company, has announced it will auction 9 blocs off the Pacific coast, but will hold auctioning off the controversial oil blocs in the Amazon rainforest at least until later this year. Jeremy Hance -10.466206 -71.326905 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11444 2013-05-16T15:33:00Z 2013-05-16T15:39:46Z Canadian government drops over $16 million on advertising its tar sands <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0516.nasa.Athabasca_oil_sands.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Canadian government has nearly doubled its advertising spending to promote the Alberta tar sands in an aggressive new lobbying push ahead of Thursday's visit to New York by the prime minister, Stephen Harper. The Harper government has increased its advertising spending on the Alberta tar sands to $16.5m from $9m a year ago. Jeremy Hance 56.96145 -111.361771 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11443 2013-05-16T14:08:00Z 2013-05-19T03:58:31Z NGO: conflict of interests behind Peruvian highway proposal in the Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0516.map.highway.peru.globalwitness.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>As Peru's legislature debates the merits of building the Purús highway through the Amazon rainforest, a new report by Global Witness alleges that the project has been aggressively pushed by those with a financial stake in opening up the remote area to logging and mining. Roads built in the Amazon lead to spikes in deforestation, mining, poaching and other extractive activities as remote areas become suddenly accessible. The road in question would cut through parts of the Peruvian Amazon rich in biodiversity and home to indigenous tribes who have chosen to live in "voluntary isolation." Jeremy Hance -9.688752 -70.695877 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11328 2013-05-01T13:32:00Z 2013-05-01T14:07:12Z Ten U.S. cities pledge to kick fossil fuel investments to the curb The cities of San Francisco and Seattle have pulled their money out of fossil fuel companies, taking a climate divestment campaign from college campuses to local government. The campaign group 350.org said on Thursday it had won commitments from a total of 10 cities and towns to divest from 200 of leading fossil fuel companies. Jeremy Hance 37.740313 -122.426605 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11323 2013-04-30T16:22:00Z 2013-05-01T16:48:35Z Conservation without supervision: Peruvian community group creates and patrols its own protected area <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/Claud-forest-Andrew-Walmsley.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>When we think of conservation areas, many of us think of iconic National Parks overseen by uniformed government employees or wilderness areas purchased and run from afar by big-donor organizations like The Nature Conservancy, Wildlife Conservation Society, WWF, or Conservation International. But what happens to ecosystems and wildlife in areas where there's a total lack of government presence and no money coming in for its protection? This is the story of one rural Peruvian community that took conservation matters into their own hands, with a little help from a dedicated pair of primate researchers, in order to protect a high biodiversity cloud forest. Jeremy Hance -7.013668 -77.476044 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11316 2013-04-29T16:55:00Z 2013-04-29T17:08:18Z Europe bans pesticides linked to bee collapse The EU has banned three neonicotinoid pesticides (imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam) linked to the decline of bees for two years. The ban will apply to all flowering crops, such as corn, rape seed, and sunflowers. The move follows a flood of recent studies, some high-profile, that have linked neonicotinoid pesticides, which employ nicotine-like chemicals, to the widespread decline of bees seen both in Europe and North America. Jeremy Hance 46.83765 3.799438 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11314 2013-04-29T14:19:00Z 2013-04-29T14:29:36Z Featured documentary: Damocracy, highlighting the battles over the Belo Monte and Ilisu dams A new short documentary highlights the battles over monster dam projects imperiling local people and wild rivers. Examining the Belo Monte dam in Brazil and the Ilisu dam in Turkey, the documentary argues that such hydroelectric projects cannot be deemed "green" energy as they overturn lives, livelihoods, and ecosystems. Jeremy Hance 37.525112 41.847389 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11278 2013-04-22T13:24:00Z 2013-04-22T13:37:50Z 'Carbon bubble' could cause next global financial crisis The world could be heading for a major economic crisis as stock markets inflate an investment bubble in fossil fuels to the tune of trillions of dollars, according to leading economists. "The financial crisis has shown what happens when risks accumulate unnoticed," said Lord (Nicholas) Stern, a professor at the London School of Economics. He said the risk was "very big indeed" and that almost all investors and regulators were failing to address it. Jeremy Hance 40.707873 -74.009063 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11269 2013-04-18T15:58:00Z 2013-04-22T16:10:53Z Up for grabs: how foreign investments are redistributing land and water across the globe <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0418.madagascar_6162.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In 2007, the increased human population, increased prices in fuel and transportation costs, and an increased demand for a diversity of food products prompted a Global Food Crisis. Agricultural producers and government leaders world-wide struggled to procure stable food sources for their countries. But the crisis had impacts beyond 2007: it was also the impetus for what we now know as the global land-grabbing phenomenon. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11253 2013-04-17T15:05:00Z 2013-04-17T15:42:04Z Judge halts military-backed dam assessment in Brazil's Amazon A federal court in Brazil has suspended the use of military and police personnel during technical research on the controversial São Luíz do Tapajós Dam in the Brazilian Amazon. The military and police were brought in to stamp down protests from indigenous people living along the Tapajós River, but the judge decreed that impacted indigenous groups must give free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC) before any furter studies can be done on the proposed dam. However, the decision is expected to be appealed. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11168 2013-04-04T18:57:00Z 2013-04-04T20:13:37Z Killings over land continues in the Amazon On Wednesday, in the Brazilian state of Pará, the trial begins of three men accused of murdering José Cláudio Ribeiro da Silva and his wife Maria do Espirito Santo, who had campaigned against loggers and ranchers for years. Their assassinations in May 2011 generated international outrage, just like that of Chico Mendes, 25 years ago, and that of the American-born nun Dorothy Stang in 2005. Jeremy Hance -5.178482 -51.818849 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11157 2013-04-03T15:38:00Z 2013-06-30T16:34:35Z U.S. Republican voters want action on climate change A new poll by the Center for Climate Change Communication (4C) at George Mason University finds that a majority of U.S. citizens who identify as Republicans or Republican-leaning independents want the government to do more to tackles climate change. Sixty-two percent of those polled said that the U.S. government "absolutely should" or "probably should" takes steps to address climate change. This goes against the views of many Republican congressmen&#8212;as well as the party platform&#8212;who largely oppose action on climate change. Jeremy Hance 38.892503 -77.00483 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11150 2013-04-02T16:37:00Z 2014-02-28T10:06:52Z Proposed coal plant threatens Critically Endangered Philippine cockatoo <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0402.Philippine-Cockatoo-photo-Peter-Widmann,-kfi.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>One kilometer off the Philippine island of Palawan lies the Rasa Island Wildlife Sanctuary; here forest grows unimpeded from a coral island surrounded by mangroves and coral reefs. Although tiny, over a hundred bird species have been recorded on the island along with a major population of large flying foxes, while in the waters below swim at least 130 species of coral fish, three types of marine turtles, and that curious-looking marine mammal, dugongs. Most importantly, perhaps, the island is home to the world's largest population of Philippine cockatoos (Cacatua haematuropygia), currently listed as Critically Endangered. But, although uninhabited by people, Rasa Island may soon be altered irrevocably by human impacts. Jeremy Hance 9.22276 118.443933 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11118 2013-03-26T15:55:00Z 2013-03-26T16:06:02Z NGO says Malaysian regulators should shut down two Sarawak companies after damning video The fallout from a video by Global Witness exposing widespread corruption in Sarawak continues, as the Bruno Manser Fund, a European NGO, has called on the Companies Commission of Malaysia to "dereigster" land corporations highlighted in the video. The video purports to connect the head of Sarawak, Chief Minister Taib Mahmud, to illegal land deals on indigenous territory. Jeremy Hance 1.510445 110.346222 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10972 2013-03-04T18:37:00Z 2013-03-04T18:47:34Z Thailand's Prime Minister commits to ending ivory trade <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0304.800px-Loxodontacyclotis.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Yesterday, Thailand's Prime Minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, committed to ending the ivory trade in her country. Her announcement came during the opening of the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Bangkok, which seeks to regulate trade in biodiversity across borders. Wildlife groups say that Thailand's legal trade in domestic ivory&#8212;international ivory is illegal of course&#8212;has created an easy opening for smugglers from abroad. Currently the ivory trade in Thailand is estimated to be second only to that of China. Jeremy Hance 13.743387 100.51506 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10885 2013-02-18T17:23:00Z 2013-02-18T17:36:21Z Over 35,000 march on Washington demanding climate action and rejection of Canada's 'carbon bomb' <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0218.climate.8482873149_cc346db0be_c.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Yesterday over 35,000 people rallied in Washington D.C. for urgent action on climate change, which, according to organizers, was the largest climate march in U.S. history. Activists called on the Obama Administration to do much more to tackle climate change, including rejecting the Keystone XL Pipeline, which would bring carbon-heavy tar sands oil from Canada through the U.S. to a world market. Jeremy Hance 38.889455 -77.035223 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10872 2013-02-13T19:16:00Z 2013-02-13T19:21:55Z Obama connects climate science and policy in State of the Union After several years of silence on climate change, U.S. President Barack Obama has begun speaking out following his re-election last November. The President surprised many by giving climate change a central role in his inauguration speech last month, and he followed-up in his State of the Union speech last night when he called on congress to "pursue a bipartisan, market-based solution to climate change," but added that the administration would take action itself if congress failed. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10859 2013-02-11T22:16:00Z 2013-02-24T00:12:51Z Rosewood in Belize: the truth behind the smoke In Belize, the uncontrolled and often illegal harvesting of rosewood has been, and still is, one of the major environmental issues in the country. In March of last year, the government established a moratorium on the export and extraction of rosewood, however illegal harvesting continued. On Friday 11 January, the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and Sustainable Development made the bold move of burning confiscated illegally cut rosewood flitches. Jeremy Hance 16.248462 -88.865318 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10828 2013-02-06T16:04:00Z 2013-02-06T16:22:47Z Head of IMF: climate change is 'the greatest economic challenge of the 21st century' Climate change not debt or austerity is "the greatest economic challenge of the 21st Century," according to Christine Lagarde, the head of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Lagarde painted a stark picture of the challenges the world faces when up against rising temperatures. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10811 2013-02-05T19:49:00Z 2013-02-05T20:03:30Z EU pushes ban on pesticides linked to bee downfall <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0205.800px-Bees_Collecting_Pollen_2004-08-14.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Following a flood of damning research on the longterm impact of neonicotinoid pesticides on bee colonies, the EU is proposing a two year ban on the popular pesticides for crops that attract bees, such as corn, sunflower, oil seed rape, cotton. The proposal comes shortly after European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) released a report that found neonicotinoid pesticides posed a "number of risks" to bees. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10687 2013-01-14T20:57:00Z 2013-01-14T20:59:26Z Malaysian candidate pledges to drop controversial dam in Sarawak if elected Malaysia's current opposition leader, Anwar Ibrahim, has pledged to cancel the controversial Baram Dam in Sarawak if upcoming general elections sweep him into the office of Prime Minister. Ibrahim made the announcement while visiting the state of Sarawak, located on the island of Borneo, over the weekend, according to the indigenous rights NGO, Bruno Manser Fund. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10545 2012-12-09T20:23:00Z 2012-12-09T20:32:08Z Climate Summit in Doha characterized by lack of ambition <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/Grand_Junction_Trip_92007_098.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Ahead of the 18th United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Doha, Qatar a variety of reports warned that the world was running out of time to avoid dangerous climate change, and that there was a widening gap between what nations have pledged to do and what the science demanded. A landmark report by the World Bank painted an almost apocalyptic picture of a world in which global temperatures have risen 4 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, including unprecedented heatwaves and droughts, rising sea levels, global agriculture crises, and a stunning loss of species. In addition, scientific studies released near the two week conference found that sea levels were rising 60 percent faster than predicted, forests around the world were imperiled by increasing drought, marine snails were dissolving in the Southern Ocean due to ocean acidification, and ice melt in Greenland and Antarctica was on the rise. Jeremy Hance 25.280092 51.534948 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10455 2012-11-27T16:47:00Z 2012-11-27T16:58:18Z Legislation leaves future of world's largest temperate rainforest up in the air <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/20110625RedBluff-4660.tongassinterview.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Although unlikely to pass anytime in the near term, recurring legislation that would hand over 80,000 acres of the Tongass Rainforest to a Native-owned logging corporation has put local communities on guard in Southeast Alaska. "The legislation privatizes a public resource. It takes land that belongs to all of us, and that all of us have a say in the use and management of, and it gives that land to a private for-profit corporation," Andrew Thoms, Executive Director of the Sitka Conservation Society, told mongabay.com in a recent interview. Jeremy Hance 59.481358 -139.296112 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10450 2012-11-26T15:24:00Z 2012-11-26T15:43:33Z Hopes pinned on Obama again as Doha Climate Summit opens <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/Hurricane_Sandy_New_Jersey_Pier.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A number of observers have expressed hope that the Obama Administration, fresh from a re-election victory in the U.S., will take a more active and ambitious role at this year's UN Climate Summit, held in Doha, Qatar. The summit opens amid fresh&#8212;and increasingly dire&#8212;warnings over climate change from the World Bank, the International Energy Agency, and the UN itself. Jeremy Hance 25.280092 51.534948 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10447 2012-11-26T00:56:00Z 2012-11-26T13:47:23Z As Doha Climate Summit kicks off, more ambitious cuts to greenhouse gas emissions needed As the 18th meeting of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) kicks off this morning in oil and gas rich Qatar, the world body warns that much more ambitious greenhouse gas cuts are needed to keep catastrophic climate change at bay. A new report by the UN Environment Program (UNEP) and the European Climate Foundation finds that even if all current emissions pledges are kept, the world will still spew 8 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent above what is needed by 2020, putting the globe on a fast-track to dangerous climate change. Jeremy Hance 25.280092 51.534948 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10444 2012-11-21T21:05:00Z 2012-11-22T03:07:39Z Australia outlaws illegally-logged wood from abroad In another blow to illegal loggers, Australia has passed the Illegal Logging Prohibition Bill, joining the U.S. in outlawing the importation of illegal logged timber from abroad. The new legislation makes it a criminal offense for Australian businesses to import timber from illegal operations. The Australian government estimates that $400 million worth of illegal timber products are sold in the country each year often as outdoor furniture and wood for decks Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10399 2012-11-14T18:34:00Z 2012-11-21T19:24:42Z Controversial wolf hunt moves to the Midwest, 196 wolves killed to date <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/nowolvesbumpersticker.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The hugely controversial wolf hunt in the U.S. has spread from the western U.S. (Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming) to the Midwest (Minnesota and Wisconsin) this year. Although the wolf hunt is less than a month old in the region&#8212;and only eleven days old in Minnesota&#8212;196 animals so far have been shot. As in the west, the wolf hunt has raised hackles among environmentalists along with fierce defenders among hunters. Wolves, which were protected under the the Endangered Species Act (ESA) since 1973, were stripped of that status by legislation in 2009, opening the door&#8212;should a state choose&#8212;to trophy hunting. Jeremy Hance 48.026672 -92.164764 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10372 2012-11-07T18:39:00Z 2012-11-07T18:54:34Z Day after Obama re-elected, group plans massive march over Keystone Pipeline and climate change Hours after President Obama's historic re-election, climate group 350.org announced a massive rally to apply pressure on the administration to reject the Keystone Pipeline, which would bring tar sands from Alberta to an international market. In 2011 the group and its partners carried out massive civil disobedience action, resulting in over 1,000 arrests, and a rally 12,000-strong that literally encircled the White House. The pressure, which was also brought to Obama campaign offices around the country, helped spur the Obama Administration to suspend the pipeline. Jeremy Hance 57.023168 -111.571083 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10370 2012-11-07T12:46:00Z 2012-11-07T13:36:14Z Controversial dam gets approval in Laos Laos has given approval to the hugely-controversial $3.5 billion Xayaburi Dam on the Mekong River, reports the BBC. The massive dam, which would provide 95 percent of its energy production to Thailand, has been criticized for anticipated impacts on the river's fish populations, on which many locals depend. Jeremy Hance 19.254027 101.814054 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10368 2012-11-06T17:39:00Z 2012-11-06T17:56:19Z Over 100,000 farmers squatting in Sumatran park to grow coffee <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/Lampung-Feb-2009-523.jpg.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park&#8212;home to the Critically Endangered Sumatran rhinos, tigers, and elephants&#8212;has become overrun with coffee farmers, loggers, and opportunists according to a new paper in Conservation and Society. An issue facing the park for decades, the study attempted for the first time to determine the number of squatters either living in or farming off Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site; the rough census&#8212;over 100,000 people&#8212;shocked scientists. Jeremy Hance -5.103255 104.000473 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10363 2012-11-05T13:21:00Z 2012-11-21T19:24:15Z It's not just Sandy: U.S. hit by record droughts, fires, and heatwaves in 2012 <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/Hurricane_Sandy_New_Jersey_Pier.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>As the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy&#8212;killing over 100 people and producing upwards of $50 billion in damage along the U.S. East Coast&#8212;has reignited a long-dormant conversation on climate change in the media, it's important to note that this is not the only weird and wild weather the U.S. has seen this year. In fact, 2012 has been a year of record-breaking weather across the U.S.: the worst drought in decades, unprecedented heatwaves, and monster forest fires. While climatologists have long stated that it is not yet possible to blame a single extreme weather event on climate change, research is showing that rising temperatures are very likely increasing the chances of extreme weather events and worsening them when they occur. Jeremy Hance 40.708816 -74.009328 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10354 2012-11-01T19:43:00Z 2012-11-01T19:57:14Z Bloomberg endorses Obama, cites climate change New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg today endorsed President Barack Obama for a second term, citing the importance of addressing climate change in the aftermath of the devastating impact of tropical storm Sandy earlier this week. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10302 2012-10-24T00:43:00Z 2012-10-24T02:04:24Z Will designation of new administrative districts lead to more deforestation in Indonesia? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://www.mongabay.com/thumbnails/indonesia/kalimantan/kali9753.JPG" align="left"/></td></tr></table>On Monday Indonesia's House of Representatives moved to establish 'North Kalimantan', a new province in Indonesian Borneo. It also voted for four new districts: Pangandaran in West Java, South Coast in Lampung, and South Manokwari and Arfak Mountains in West Papua. While the moves aim to improve governance by boosting local autonomy, they could make it more difficult for Indonesia to meet its deforestation reduction goals if recent trends &#8212; detailed in a 2011 academic paper &#8212; hold true. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10300 2012-10-23T18:54:00Z 2012-10-23T19:08:24Z Lack of climate change in presidential debates part of larger trend The final presidential debate between President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney, focusing on foreign policy, ended like all the others: without a mention of climate change or its likely impacts on Americans, from rising sea levels to worsening extreme weather to the threat of instability abroad. While environmental groups have kicked-off a campaign to target this "climate silence," the lack of discussion on climate change is a part of a larger trend in the U.S. where media coverage of the issue has declined even as scientists argue that impacts are increasing. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10265 2012-10-11T20:12:00Z 2012-10-11T20:28:37Z Saving the world's species from oblivion will cost around $80 billion a year, but still a good deal If the world is to conserve its wealth of life&#8212;species great and small, beautiful and terrible, beloved and unknown&#8212;it will cost from $3.41-4.76 billion annually in targeted conservation funds, according to a new study in Science. But that's not all, the cost of protecting and managing the world's conservation areas was estimated at an additional $76.1 billion a year. Jeremy Hance 17.375542 78.480034 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10253 2012-10-10T15:31:00Z 2012-10-10T15:51:57Z Over 70 percent of Americans: climate change worsening extreme weather According to a new poll, 74 percent of Americans agree that climate change is impacting weather in the U.S., including 73 percent who agreed, strongly or somewhat, that climate change had exacerbated record high temperatures over the summer. The findings mean that a large majority of Americans agree with climatologists who in recent years have found increasingly strong evidence that climate change has both increased and worsened extreme weather events. Jeremy Hance 38.897596 -77.036437 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10251 2012-10-09T19:35:00Z 2012-10-09T19:52:54Z Indigenous groups re-occupy Belo Monte dam in the Amazon Construction on Brazil's megadam, Belo Monte, has been halted again as around 150 demonstrators, most of them from nearby indigenous tribes, have occupied the main construction site at Pimental. Over a hundred indigenous people joined local fishermen who had been protesting the dam for 24 days straight. Indigenous people and local fishermen say the dam will devastate the Xingu River, upending their way of life. Jeremy Hance -3.184394 -52.210694 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10244 2012-10-08T14:23:00Z 2012-10-08T14:32:17Z 90 percent of oil palm plantations came at expense of forest in Kalimantan <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://travel.mongabay.com/indonesia/150/kalimantan_0034.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>From 1990 to 2010 almost all palm oil expansion in Kalimantan came at the expense of forest cover, according to the most detailed look yet at the oil palm industry in the Indonesian state, published in Nature: Climate Change. Palm oil plantations now cover 31,640 square kilometers of the state, having expanded nearly 300 percent since 2000. The forest loss led to the emission of 0.41 gigatons of carbon, more than Indonesia's total industrial emissions produced in a year. Furthermore the scientists warn that if all current leases were converted by 2020, over a third of Kalimantan's lowland forests outside of protected areas would become plantations and nearly quadruple emissions. Jeremy Hance -1.579085 114.045868 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10233 2012-10-04T17:44:00Z 2012-10-04T17:52:14Z Nary a mention of climate change during U.S. presidential debate The hour-and-a-half long debate between President Barack Obama and ex-governor Mitt Romney last night ended without a single reference to climate change. Frustrated with the lack of discussion on the issue from both candidates, environmental activists sent a petition with over 160,000 signatures to debate moderator, Jim Lehr, urging him to ask a question about climate change. The petition fell on deaf ears. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10079 2012-08-30T17:32:00Z 2012-09-04T19:33:07Z Indigenous groups in Panama wait for UN REDD to meet promises <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/panama/150/panama_0184.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A dispute over the implementation of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) in Panama has pitted the United Nations (UN) against the nation's diverse and large indigenous groups. Represented by the National Coordinator of Indigenous Peoples in Panama (COONAPIP), indigenous groups charge that the UN has failed to meet several pledges related to kick-starting REDD+ with their support, including delaying a $1.79 million payment to the group to begin REDD+-related activities. The on-going dispute highlights the perils and complexities of implementing REDD+, especially concerns that the program might disenfranchise indigenous groups who have long been the stewards of their forest territories. Jeremy Hance 9.001061 -79.533577 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10021 2012-08-15T19:53:00Z 2012-08-29T22:33:06Z Belo Monte mega-dam halted again by high Brazilian court, appeal likely but difficult <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/12/0323belomonte150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A high federal court in Brazil has ruled that work on the Belo Monte dam in the Brazilian Amazon be immediately suspended. Finding that the government failed to properly consult indigenous people on the dam, the ruling is the latest in innumerable twists and turns regarding the massive dam, which was first conceived in the 1970s, and has been widely criticized for its impact on tribal groups in the region and the Amazon environment. In addition the Regional Federal Tribunal (TRF1) found that Brazil's Environmental Impact Assessment was flawed since it was conducted after work on the dam had already begun. Jeremy Hance -3.184394 -52.210694 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9965 2012-08-06T19:05:00Z 2012-08-16T13:40:40Z Cambodia's largest lowland rainforest spared from new land concessions Four economic land concessions have been cancelled in Cambodia's Prey Lang forest, known as the largest intact lowland forest in Southeast Asia, reports the Phnom Penh Post. The economic land concessions, totaling over 40,000 hectares, would have been used for rubber plantations. Jeremy Hance 13.20786 105.627823 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9953 2012-08-01T22:03:00Z 2012-08-16T13:44:23Z Peru considers big changes to its environmental reviews The Peruvian government is looking into making large-scale changes to its Environment Impact Assessments (EIA) after a review found significant problems with the vast majority of past reviews, reports the Inter Press Service. The news comes a few weeks after protests over a proposed gold and copper mine in the Andes left five people dead, including a 17-year-old boy. Jeremy Hance -7.164257 -78.508673 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9951 2012-08-01T20:26:00Z 2012-08-16T13:46:09Z Tigers vs. coal in India: when big energy meets vanishing cats <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/800px-182619562_00d6f703b6_b.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Burning coal fuels climate change, causes acid rain, and spreads toxic pollutants into the environment, but now a new Greenpeace report warns that coal may also imperil the world's biggest feline: the tiger. Home to world's largest population of tigers&#8212;in this case the Bengal subspecies (Panthera tigris tigris)&#8212;India is also the world's third largest coal producer. The country's rapacious pursuit of coal&#8212;it has nearly doubled production since 2007&#8212;has pushed the industry into tiger territory, threatening to destroy forests and fragment the tiger's already threatened population. Jeremy Hance 23.85821 82.270889 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9938 2012-07-30T17:52:00Z 2012-08-16T14:04:00Z 'National scandal:' foreign companies stripped Papua New Guinea of community-owned forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/Pomio-pic_2.palmoil.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Eleven percent of Papua New Guinea's land area has been handed over to foreign corporations and companies lacking community representation, according to a new report by Greenpeace. The land has been granted under controversial government agreements known as Special Agricultural and Business Leases (SABLs), which scientists have long warned has undercut traditional landholding rights in the country and decimated many of Papua New Guinea's biodiverse rainforests. To date, 72 SABLs have been granted&#8212;mostly to logging companies&#8212;covering an area totaling 5.1 million hectares or the size of Costa Rica. Jeremy Hance -9.477508 147.19677 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9835 2012-07-13T02:49:00Z 2012-07-13T03:08:45Z Republican stalwart calls global warming 'a matter of fact', pushes for carbon tax Former Secretary of State George Shultz is calling for a carbon tax to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and oil consumption, according to an interview released today by Stanford University. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9816 2012-07-11T20:22:00Z 2012-07-11T20:40:52Z Thousands of scientists hold mock funeral in Canada to highlight nation's "death of evidence" Carrying signs that said 'Stop Harper's War on Knowledge' and 'Scientists Shouldn't Wear a Muzzle,' Canada's scientists were unusually theatrical yesterday at a rally against the Canadian government's cuts for basic science funding and environmental protections. Scientists, dressed in white coats, carried a coffin to represent "the death of evidence" in Canada, while a costumed grim-reaper led the way. According to police, around 2,000 joined in the protest. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9690 2012-06-18T18:29:00Z 2012-06-18T18:49:44Z WWF: biggest villain at Rio+20 is Canada Having sent a delegation to the United Nation's Rio+20 Summit on Sustainable Development, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), the world's biggest conservation group, has recently declared their Heroes and Villains of Rio+20&#8212;so far. The NGO has strong words for the negotiating position of the U.S. and the major oil exporting countries (OPEC), but saves its harshest criticisms for Canada. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9596 2012-05-31T14:37:00Z 2012-05-31T15:07:34Z Indigenous rights rising in tropical forests, but big gaps remain <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/papua/150/papua_0487.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In the last twenty years, rights for indigenous forest dwellers have expanded significantly, according to a new report by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI). Covering nearly thirty tropical forest countries, the report finds that indigenous people now hold rights to 31 percent of the forest land in these countries, rising from 21 percent in 1992. However, landmark land rights for indigenous people remain imperiled by lack of enforcement, land-grabbing, government ambivalence, and industrial development. The report comes less than a month before the Rio+20 Summit on Sustainable Development, a meeting of global leaders that marks two decades since the Rio Earth Summit. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9528 2012-05-16T18:57:00Z 2012-05-16T19:00:46Z Featured video: why one scientist is getting arrested over climate change In March 2012 the head of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies and well-known climatologist, James Hansen, spoke at a TED conference to explain what would push a 70-year-old scientist to participate in civil disobedience against mountaintop coal mining and the Keystone Pipeline, even leading to several arrests. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9523 2012-05-15T21:00:00Z 2012-05-15T21:43:58Z Consumption, population, and declining Earth: wake-up call for Rio+20 <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/new_mexico_061.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Currently, human society is consuming natural resources as if there were one-and-a-half Earths, and not just a single blue planet, according to the most recent Living Planet Report released today. If governments and societies continue with 'business-as-usual' practices, we could be consuming three years of natural resources in 12 months by 2050. Already, this ecological debt is decimating wildlife populations worldwide, disproportionately hurting the world's poor and most vulnerable, threatening imperative resources like food and water, heating up the atmosphere, and risking global well-being. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9512 2012-05-14T12:52:00Z 2012-05-14T13:15:21Z President of Czech Republic to give keynote at Heartland climate summit despite backlash over murderer billboards Companies are abandoning the Heartland Institute left-and-right following the conservative group's controversial climate change billboard campaign, but Czech President, Václav Klaus, is sticking with the group, reports the Guardian. Although he criticized the Heartland's short-lived campaign, Klaus is still planning to be the keynote speaker at the Heartland Institute's upcoming annual climate change summit, which gathers prominent climate denialists from around the world. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9488 2012-05-08T15:05:00Z 2012-05-08T15:38:16Z Heartland Institute losing major corporate sponsors after comparing climate change advocates to mass-murderers <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/ipcc-temp.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Heartland Institute has lost two corporate supporters since it unveiled a billboard campaign that compared those who accept the science of climate change to mass murderer Ted Kaczynski also known as the Unabomber. Yesterday, State Farm Insurance confirmed it was severing ties with the group, while on Sunday, Diageo, a major alcoholic drink company, announced it was also cutting its support of the conservative think tank. Even before this, General Motors (GM) cut ties with the group over its climate stance. The exodus of the three corporate supporters has lost the Heartland Institute an estimated $180,000 for 2012, according to fundraising documents leaked to the media. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9483 2012-05-07T12:12:00Z 2012-05-08T17:08:56Z Fallout for Heartland Institute after it likens those who accept climate change to 'murderers' and 'madmen' According to the Heartland Institute, a conservative think tank, those who accept the science of climate change are 'on the radical fringe' with the movements most 'prominent advocates' being 'murderers, tyrants, and madmen.' The Heartland Institute's statements came as it launched a billboard campaign featuring notorious mass-murderer, Ted Kaczynski also known as the Unabomber, on a billboard in Chicago that read 'I still believe in Global Warming? Do you?' The Kaczynski billboard remained live for 24 hours before widespread condemnation, including from the Heartland Institute's own supporters, pushed the group to pull the billboard. It has now suspended the short-lived campaign which was also going to feature similar billboards with Fidel Castro, Osama Bin Laden, and hostage-taker James J. Lee. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9475 2012-05-03T17:19:00Z 2012-12-02T22:30:15Z Exploring Asia's lost world <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/mccann.waterdragon.P1070954.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Abandoned by NGOs and the World Bank, carved out for rubber plantations and mining by the Cambodian government, spiraling into a chaos of poaching and illegal logging, and full of endangered species and never-explored places, Virachey National Park may be the world's greatest park that has been written off by the international community. But a new book by explorer and PhD student, Greg McCann, hopes to change that. Entitled Called Away by a Mountain Spirit: Journey to the Green Corridor, the book highlights expeditions by McCann into parts of Virachey that have rarely been seen by outsiders and have never been explored scientifically, including rare grasslands that once housed herds of Asian elephants, guar, and Sambar deer, before poachers drove them into hiding, and faraway mountains with rumors of tigers and mainland Javan rhinos. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9474 2012-05-03T14:44:00Z 2012-05-03T15:18:04Z Thousands worldwide to "connect the dots" between climate change and extreme weather this weekend <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/521905_10150775362082708_12185972707_9547128_1684330308_n.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>On Saturday, May 5th vulnerable populations from the United States to Bangladesh will "connect the dots" between devastating extreme weather and climate change in a global day of action organized by 350.org. The nearly 1,000 events occurring in over half of the world's nations are meant to highlight to governments, media, and the public that climate change is impacting lives through an increase in number and intensity of devastating weather events, such as droughts, heatwaves, and floods. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9443 2012-04-26T12:54:00Z 2012-04-26T13:15:34Z NGO: lifting sanctions on Myanmar must lead to forestry reform Following historic elections, many foreign powers have relaxed or lifted sanctions against Myanmar, also known as Burma. But the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) warns that the end of sanctions presents Myanmar and the world with a choice: further plundering of the country's forests for outside markets or large-scale forestry reform. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9428 2012-04-23T12:35:00Z 2012-04-23T12:47:45Z Mexico passes aggressive climate bill <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/mexico/150/cancun_0113.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Last week, Mexico's Senate passed an aggressive and comprehensive climate change bill, making it the first developing nation and only the second country to do so, after the UK. The bill, which far outshines anything achieved by its far wealthier northern neighbors, sets ambitious targets for cutting emissions while creating new incentive programs for clean energy. Largely dependent on fossil fuels, Mexico is approximately the 11th highest greenhouse gas emitter in the world. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9411 2012-04-18T19:21:00Z 2012-04-18T20:48:40Z Pictures: Destruction of the Amazon's Xingu River begins for Belo Monte Dam <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/12/0418belomonte150a.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Xingu River will never be the same. Construction of Belo Monte Dam has begun in the Brazilian Amazon, as shown by these photos taken by Greenpeace, some of the first images of the hugely controversial project. Indigenous groups have opposed the dam vigorously for decades, fearing that it will upend their way of life. Environmentalists warn that the impacts of the dam&#8212;deforestation, methane emissions, and an irreparable changes to the Xingu River's ecosystem&#8212;far outweigh any benefits. The dam, which would be the world's third largest, is expected to displace 16,000 people according to the government, though some NGOs put the number at 40,000. The dam will flood over 40,000 hectares of pristine rainforest, an area nearly seven times the size of Manhattan. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9398 2012-04-16T15:06:00Z 2012-04-16T15:09:46Z Police hired by loggers in Papua New Guinea lock locals in shipping containers <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/Pomio-pic_3.bulldozer.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Locals protesting the destruction of their forest in Papua New Guinea for two palm oil plantations say police have been sent in for a second time to crack-down on their activities, even as a Commission of Inquiry (COI) investigates the legality of the concession. Traditional landowners in Pomio District on the island East New Britain say police bankrolled by Malaysian logging giant Rimbunan Hijau (RH) have terrorized the population, including locking people in shipping containers for three consecutive nights. The palm oil concessions belongs to a company known as Gilford Limited, which locals say is a front group for RH. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9387 2012-04-11T16:05:00Z 2012-04-11T16:13:54Z Blood rosewood: Thailand and Cambodia team up to tackle illegal logging crisis and save lives Cambodian and Thai officials have agreed to work together to combat illegal logging of rosewood and resulting violence between Cambodian loggers and Thai rangers, reports MCOT online news. Officials with both nations met on Tuesday and spent three hours discussing the issue. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9352 2012-04-04T14:37:00Z 2012-04-04T14:51:52Z "Don't be so silly" about climate change: Mohamed Nasheed on The Daily Show <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/theislandpresident-photo3.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Mohamed Nasheed, former president of the Maldives, told the world on The Daily Show Monday night: "Just don't be so silly" about climate change. Nasheed, who in February was forced to resign his presidency, is visiting the U.S. to meet with government officials as well as to push for climate action during the release of a new documentary film about his presidency, entitled The Island President. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9348 2012-04-03T14:12:00Z 2012-04-03T14:30:29Z Massive coal mine in Australia beats back climate change legal challenge An Australian court last week ruled that climate change was not reason enough to halt the $6.3 billion Wandoan coal mine in Australia in a landmark case. Swiss coal mining company Xstrata succeeded in defeating a challenge from the environmental NGO Friends of the Earth and local farmers, which argued that the mine should be halted due to its resulting carbon emissions. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9324 2012-03-28T16:46:00Z 2012-04-04T12:05:33Z Turkey's rich biodiversity at risk <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/turkey.cagan.raptor.IMG_1449.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Turkey: the splendor of the Hagia Sophia, the ruins of Ephesus, and the bizarre caves of the Cappadocia. For foreign travelers, Turkey is a nation of cultural, religious, and historic wonders: a place where cultures have met, clashed, and co-created. However, Turkey has another wealth that is far less known: biodiversity. Of the globe's 34 biodiversity hotspots, Turkey is almost entirely covered by three: the Caucasus, the Irano-Anatolian, and the Mediterranean. Despite its wild wealth, conservation is not a priority in Turkey and recent papers in Science and Biological Conservation warn that the current development plans in the country, which rarely take the environment into account, are imperiling its species and ecosystems. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9308 2012-03-26T14:20:00Z 2012-03-26T14:46:25Z Indigenous groups fight for recognition and illumination in Peru <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/patrickleflufy.P1000083.1.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>"Shh, wait here," Wilson told me. I ducked down behind the buttress of a large tree to wait. We had been walking through the jungle for a few hours. At first we followed a path through the undergrowth, a wet world of ferns, trunks and lianas speckled with the sunlight that made it down through the canopy and understory, but soon we simply walked along a route Wilson picked out. I had been trying to concentrate on the myriad sounds: cicadas were the background and various small birds tweeted from different points. We were listening and looking for signs that would lead us to prey&#8212;perhaps the calm whistle of a perdiz or the scent&#8212;marking of a boar&#8212;but just before Wilson became excited I had heard nothing. He stopped and said, "Red monkeys," pointing ahead. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9298 2012-03-22T16:41:00Z 2012-03-22T18:25:26Z World's smallest dolphin: only 55 left, but continue to drown in nets The world's smallest dolphin is also the closest to extinction. New Zealand government figures show that Maui's dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui) are down to just 55 mature individuals, falling from 111 in 2005. The small cetaceans, measuring up to 1.7 meters (5.5 feet), are imperiled due to drowning in gillnets with the most recent death by a fisherman's net occurring in January. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9283 2012-03-20T12:30:00Z 2012-03-20T12:52:44Z Belize enacts moratorium on rosewood <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/rosewood.belize.moratorium.stump.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Belizean Government has banned the harvesting and export of rosewood with immediate effect, in response to the widespread clearing of the hardwood species for the Asian market. A government statement released on Friday, March 16th claimed the moratorium was necessary "to carry out an orderly assessment of the situation on the ground and as a first response to regulate the timber trade occurring in southern Belize." The government would subsequently institute "a rigorous regulatory framework throughout the country." Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9257 2012-03-15T19:45:00Z 2013-02-24T02:07:12Z Scientists say massive palm oil plantation will "cut the heart out" of Cameroon's rainforest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/aerialview.heraklesplantation.150..jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Eleven top scientists have slammed a proposed palm oil plantation in a Cameroonian rainforest surrounded by five protected areas. In an open letter, the researchers allege that Herakles Farm, which proposes the 70,000 hectare plantation in southwest Cameroon, has misled the government about the state of the forest to be cleared and has violated rules set by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), of which it's a member. The scientists, many of whom are considered leaders in their field, argue that the plantation will destroy rich forests, imperil endangered species, and sow conflict with local people. Jeremy Hance 5.253017 9.054737 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9255 2012-03-15T14:30:00Z 2012-03-15T15:04:33Z Featured Video: the true cost of the tar sands What's the big deal about the tar sands? Canadian photographer Garth Lenz presents the local environmental and social concerns presented by the tar sands in a concise, impassioned speech in a TEDx talk in Victoria, Canada. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9240 2012-03-12T15:00:00Z 2012-03-12T15:23:05Z Climate journalism gone awry <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/bigstock_Coal_Power_Plant_800448.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A leading journalist and editor at The Atlantic made a startling admission regarding how she writes about climate science last week. Megan McArdle, who not long ago wrote in-depth about documents leaked from Heartland Institute, has noted that as a journalist she depends on her comprehension of climate science on two non-experts and one climatologist who is widely viewed as an outlier for his view that climate change may actually be good for the world. Jeremy Hance