tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/jaguars1 jaguars news from mongabay.com 2015-04-07T17:37:12Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14604 2015-04-07T17:33:00Z 2015-04-07T17:37:12Z Brazilian farmers urge return of big cats to Cerrado to protect crops from rampaging peccaries <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0407-co06-1366.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Margie Peixoto was driving her pickup across her farm in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul one February afternoon when she spotted some broken corn stalks and a trio of white-lipped peccaries ambling along the red-clay road as if they owned it. The moment these wild pig relatives spotted the truck, they snorted, snarled and disappeared into the head-high crop, where dozens more likely hid. Morgan Erickson-Davis -17.888114 -54.308152 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14304 2015-01-26T15:17:00Z 2015-01-30T16:17:07Z Video: camera trap catches jaguar hunting peccaries Catching a jaguar on a remote camera trap in the Amazon is a rare, happy sight. But catching a jaguar attempting to ambush a herd of peccaries is quite simply astonishing. Jeremy Hance -3.228753 -73.187293 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13859 2014-10-02T13:55:00Z 2014-12-30T22:30:56Z What makes the jaguar the ultimate survivor? New books highlights mega-predator's remarkable past and precarious future <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1002.thumbnail.9781597269964.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>For thousands of years the jaguar was a God, then it was vermin to be destroyed, and today it is the inspiration for arguably the most ambitious conservation effort on the planet. A new book by renowned big cat conservationist, Alan Rabinowitz, tells this remarkable story from the jaguar's evolutionary origins in Asia to its re-emergence today as a cultural and ecological symbol. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13719 2014-08-27T18:52:00Z 2014-11-06T17:48:27Z The Gran Canal: will Nicaragua's big bet create prosperity or environmental ruin? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0827.800px-Volcanic_Island.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A hundred years ago, the Panama Canal reshaped global geography. Now a new project, spearheaded by a media-shy Chinese millionaire, wants to build a 278-kilometer canal through Nicaragua. While the government argues the mega-project will change the country's dire economic outlook overnight, critics contend it will cause undue environmental damage, upend numerous communities, and do little to help local people. Jeremy Hance 11.392321 -85.465667 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13614 2014-07-31T12:53:00Z 2014-12-29T21:41:17Z Seeking justice for Corazón: jaguar killings test the conservation movement in Mexico <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0731.0731.2009-06-June-27---Corazon---Los-Pavos.ac.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Eight years ago, a female jaguar cub was caught on film by a motion-triggered camera trap set in the foothills of canyons, oak forest, and scrubland that make-up the Northern Jaguar Reserve, just 125 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border. Three years later, in 2009, the jaguar reappeared on film as an adult. They called her 'Corazón' for the distinctive heart-shaped spot on her left shoulder. Jeremy Hance 29.056000 -109.231003 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13399 2014-06-17T18:18:00Z 2014-12-30T22:42:43Z Camera trap captures first ever video of rarely-seen bird in the Amazon...and much more <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1107.Mosquera--Nocturnal-curassow.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A camera trap program in Ecuador's embattled Yasuni National Program has struck gold, taking what researchers believe is the first ever film of a wild nocturnal curassow (Nothocrax urumutum). In addition, the program has captured video of other rarely-seen animals, including the short-eared dog and the giant armadillo. Jeremy Hance -0.637516 -76.148906 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13331 2014-06-03T19:22:00Z 2014-06-03T19:43:04Z Four donors pledge $80 million for big cats Four donors from around the world have pledged $80 million to cat conservation group, Panthera. The money will fund projects working to preserve tigers, lions, jaguars, cheetahs, leopards, snow leopards, and cougars over ten years. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12562 2013-12-23T18:13:00Z 2013-12-23T18:13:48Z Jaguars in Argentine Chaco on verge of local extinction <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1216jaguar150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The majestic jaguar (<i>Panthera onca</i>), the largest of the New World cats, is found as far north as the southern states of the US, and as far south as northern Argentina. In the past jaguars ranged 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) further south, but their range has shrunk as habitat loss and human disturbance have increased. Overall, jaguars are classified as Near Threatened by the IUCN, but the level of risk facing jaguars varies by region. Populations in Argentina, at the present-day southern range limit, have previously been identified as some of the most threatened of them all. Tiffany Roufs -26.667096 -60.959474 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11635 2013-06-24T18:24:00Z 2013-06-25T23:55:17Z 60 big cats killed in Brazilian parks in last two years <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://travel.mongabay.com/brazil/150/brazil_1950.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>At least 60 big cats have been killed within national protected areas in Brazil during the past two years according to a recent survey published in mongabay.com's open access journal Tropical Conservation Science. The report, which focuses on jaguar (<i>Panthera onca</i>) and puma (<i>Puma concolor</i>) populations, within Brazilian protected areas shows that reserve management and use restrictions impact the level of big cat hunting. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11446 2013-05-16T19:42:00Z 2015-02-09T22:57:44Z Crazy cat numbers: unusually high jaguar densities discovered in the Amazon rainforest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0516.wwf.sandiego.Jaguar-2.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Jaguars (<i>Panthera onca</i>) are the biggest cat in the Americas and the only member of the Panthera genus in the New World; an animal most people recognize, the jaguar is also the third largest cat in the world with an intoxicatingly dangerous beauty. The feline ranges from the harsh deserts of southern Arizona to the lush rainforests of Central America, and from the Pantanal wetlands all the way down to northern Argentina. These mega-predators stalk prey quietly through the grasses of Venezuelan savannas, prowl the Atlantic forests of eastern Brazil, hunt along the river of the Amazon, and even venture into lower parts of the Andes. Jeremy Hance -12.036634 -69.727936 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10894 2013-02-19T14:55:00Z 2015-02-09T22:30:12Z Jaguars, tapirs, oh my!: Amazon explorer films shocking wildlife bonanza in threatened forest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0219.jaguar.Screen-Shot-2013-02-07-at-8.56.21-AM.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Watching a new video by Amazon explorer, Paul Rosolie, one feels transported into a hidden world of stalking jaguars, heavyweight tapirs, and daylight-wandering giant armadillos. This is the Amazon as one imagines it as a child: still full of wild things. In just four weeks at a single colpa (or clay lick where mammals and birds gather) on the lower Las Piedras River, Rosolie and his team captured 30 Amazonian species on video, including seven imperiled species. However, the very spot Rosolie and his team filmed is under threat: the lower Las Piedras River is being infiltrated by loggers, miners, and farmers following the construction of the Trans-Amazon highway. Jeremy Hance -12.055437 -69.818916 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10866 2013-02-13T15:50:00Z 2015-02-09T22:31:11Z Chasing down 'quest species': new book travels the world in search of rarity in nature <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0213.javanrhino.HI_36558.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In his new book, The Kingdom of Rarities, Eric Dinerstein chases after rare animals around the world, from the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) in Brazil to the golden langur (Trachypithecus geei) in Bhutan to Kirtland's warbler (<i>Setophaga kirtlandii</i>) in the forests of Michigan. Throughout his journeys, he tackles the concept of rarity in nature head-on. Contrary to popular belief, rarity is actually the norm in the wildlife world. Jeremy Hance 27.228989 90.402374 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10721 2013-01-17T20:44:00Z 2015-01-13T05:53:36Z Can ranchers co-exist with jaguars? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/0117jaguar_credit-Steve-Winter_Panthera150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Jaguar once roamed from the United States to Argentina, but today they've been eliminated from several range countries, including the United States. The chief reasons are habitat loss and direct killing by humans, putting ranchers and farmers at the heart of the issue. Both ranchers and farmers convert key jaguar habitat and kill the big cats as a threat to their livestock. However in parts of Brazil's Pantanal, some ranchers are going about their business without killing jaguars. <i>My Pantanal</i>, a film by Andrea Heydlauff, Vice President of the wild cat conservation group Panthera, takes a look at one particular ranch that is helping prove that jaguars and ranchers can co-exist. Rhett Butler -18.646245 -57.438171 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10212 2012-09-27T14:15:00Z 2013-02-05T15:11:48Z Jaguar conservation gets a boost in North and Central America <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/jaguarsitting_credit.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Jaguar conservation has received a huge boost in the past few months both in Latin America and in the U.S. An historic agreement singed between the world's leading wild cat conservation organization Panthera and the government of Costa Rica in addition to a new U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) proposal bring renewed hope to the efforts to revive the iconic jaguar in its current habitat and return the cats to the American Southwest. Jeremy Hance 9.935035 -84.088211 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10022 2012-08-15T21:47:00Z 2015-02-08T23:18:41Z Key mammals dying off in rainforest fragments <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/jlh/ecuador/Yasuni.150/Yasuni_22.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>When the Portuguese first arrived on the shores of what is now Brazil, a massive forest waited for them. Not the Amazon, but the Atlantic Forest, stretching for over 1.2 million kilometers. Here jaguars, the continent's apex predator, stalked peccaries, while tapirs waded in rivers and giant anteaters unearthed termites mounds. Here, also, the Tupi people numbered around a million people. Now, almost all of this gone: 93 percent of the Atlantic Forest has been converted to agriculture, pasture, and cities, the bulk of it lost since the 1940s. The Tupi people are largely vanished due to slavery and disease, and, according to a new study in the open access journal PLoS ONE, so are many of the forest's megafauna, from jaguars to giant anteaters. Jeremy Hance -24.081574 -47.424065 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9632 2012-06-06T17:55:00Z 2012-06-06T18:07:28Z Jaguars photographed in palm oil plantation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/pan.jag.palm.4D2442338.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>As the highly-lucrative palm oil plantation moves from Southeast Asia to Africa and Latin America, it brings with it concerns of deforestation and wildlife loss. But an ongoing study in Colombia is finding that small palm oil plantations may not significantly hurt at least one species: the jaguar. Researchers in Magdalena River Valley have taken the first ever photos of jaguars in a palm plantation, including a mother with two cubs, showing that the America's biggest cat may not avoid palm oil plantations like its Asian relative, the tiger. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9580 2012-05-29T19:48:00Z 2015-02-05T01:21:40Z Herp paradise preserved in Guatemala <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/sierracarrel.salamander.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Fifteen conservation groups have banded together to save around 2,400 hectares (6,000 acres) of primary rainforest in Guatemala, home to a dozen imperiled amphibians as well as the recently discovered Merendon palm pit viper (<i>Bothriechis thalassinus</i>). The new park, dubbed the Sierra Caral Amphibian Reserve, lies in the Guatemalan mountains on the border with Honduras in a region that has been called the most important conservation area in Guatemala. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9525 2012-05-16T14:47:00Z 2012-05-16T16:04:34Z Jaguar v. sea turtle: when land and marine conservation icons collide <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/jaguars-predation-green-turtle,-GVI.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>At first, an encounter between a jaguar (Panthera onca) and a green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) seems improbable, even ridiculous, but the two species do come into fatal contact when a female turtle, every two to four years, crawls up a jungle beach to lay her eggs. A hungry jaguar will attack the nesting turtle, killing it with a bite to the neck, and dragging the massive animal&#8212;sometime all the way into the jungle&#8212;to eat the muscles around the neck and flippers. Despite the surprising nature of such encounters, this behavior, and its impact on populations, has been little studied. Now, a new study in Costa Rica's Tortuguero National Park has documented five years of jaguar attacks on marine turtles&#8212;and finds these encounters are not only more common than expected, but on the rise. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8885 2011-12-21T19:27:00Z 2011-12-21T21:34:46Z Animal picture of the day: rare photo of mother jaguar and cubs <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/3X4T7779-corr1.j150.pg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A mother jaguar, named Kaaiyana by scientists, and cubs were recently photographed in Kaa Iya National Park in Bolivia. "Kaaiyana’s tolerance of observers is a testimony to the absence of hunters in this area, and her success as a mother means there is plenty of food for her and her cubs to eat," said John Polisar, coordinator of Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Jaguar Conservation Program. WCS released the photos. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8572 2011-10-19T19:06:00Z 2011-10-19T19:30:19Z Picture of the day: jaguars take self-portraits in Bolivia <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/wcs.jaguar.cameratrap.1.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A study by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in Bolivia's Madidi National Park has produced 19 jaguar 'self-portraits' via digital cameras that snap photos of wildlife when they cross an infrared beam, known as camera traps. This is the most jaguars catalogued by camera trap study yet in Bolivia. "The preliminary results of this new expedition underscore the importance of the Madidi landscape to jaguars and other charismatic rainforest species," said Dr. Julie Kunen, Director of WCS’s Latin America and Caribbean Program, in a press release. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7648 2011-03-28T17:25:00Z 2011-03-28T17:57:26Z How to save the Pantanal and increase profits for the cattle industry <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/brazil_1314.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Pantanal spanning Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay is the world's largest wetland—the size of Florida—and home to a wide-variety of charismatic species, such as jaguars, capybaras, and giant anteaters. However, the great wetland is threatened by expansion in big agriculture and an increasingly intensive cattle industry. Yet there is hope: a new study by Wildlife Conservation Society of Brazil (WCS-Brazil) researchers has found that cattle and the ecosystem can exist harmoniously. By replacing current practices with rotational grazing, cattle ranchers gain a healthier herd and more profits while safeguarding the ecological integrity and wildlife of the world's largest wetland system. The study published in mongabay.com's open access journal <i>Tropical Conservation Science</i> is a rare instance of a win-win situation. Jeremy Hance