tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/interviews1 interviews news from mongabay.com 2015-06-25T17:52:57Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/15037 2015-06-25T17:29:00Z 2015-06-25T17:52:57Z Do we need to move 'beyond certification' to save forests? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/sabah/150/sabah_1148.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Over the past two years dozens of companies have established 'zero-deforestation' or 'deforestation-free' policies for the commodities they source, trade, and produce. The pace of adoption has been staggeringly fast for a business that have been historically slow-moving relative to other industries. Some sectors, like the Indonesian palm oil industry and the Brazilian soy industry, even appear to be nearing a critical mass where the majority of international buyers and traders are now bound by such agreements. Rhett Butler 19.461253 104.367470 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/15028 2015-06-24T16:10:00Z 2015-06-24T16:24:58Z Video: Vet describes emotional toll of responding to brutal rhino poaching <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-imgs.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0624_MSmith_FowldsRhinoVideo_Thumbnail.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In March 2012 poachers struck a South African game reserve. They drugged three rhinos and hacked off their horns, inflicting massive facial trauma to the immobile but unanesthetized animals. Wildlife veterinarian Will Fowlds attended to the victims. Rebecca Kessler -33.573087 26.603058 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/15008 2015-06-19T22:48:00Z 2015-06-19T22:53:02Z Many tropical species surprisingly resilient, if not actively persecuted <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/papua/150/papua_5138.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Dr. Richard Corlett is the current Director of the Center for Integrative Conservation at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, which is part of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He is also a former president of ATBC, and one of the keynote speakers for this year’s conference in Hawaii. Dr. Corlett recently spoke with Mongabay.com about some of the insights he’s gained from his research in tropical ecology and conservation. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14976 2015-06-16T18:35:00Z 2015-06-17T15:54:16Z How solar thermal curbs pollution and improves health Modern environmental crises of global resources often threaten both human health as well as biodiversity. Many of these concerns have consistently escaped remediation by public health institutions and mainstream environmental organizations. The compounding severity of these threats requires solutions that are cheap, local, scalable, easily replicated and immediately beneficial to local populations and wildlife. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14833 2015-05-20T20:38:00Z 2015-06-18T16:28:56Z VICE’s 'Indonesia's Palm Bomb' presents a tragic view of palm oil driven deforestation from the frontlines <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0519mikegriffths150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>For the sixth episode of its third season, HBO’s Emmy-winning news series, VICE, focused its lens on Indonesia’s palm oil industry. The episode, entitled, 'Indonesia's Palm Bomb', follows VICE correspondent, Ben Anderson, as he investigates the environmental and social impact of widespread (and, at times, illegal) deforestation on wildlife and indigenous communities in Sumatra. Rhett Butler 0.753238 100.984464 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14784 2015-05-11T20:50:00Z 2015-05-16T18:58:09Z Videos reveal rare birds, wild monkeys, and jaguar family in oil-exploited park <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0511.THUMB.cameratrapvids.sloth.salt.Screen-Shot-2015-05-11-at-3.26.58-PM.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A compilation of new camera trap videos from Yasuni National Park shows off rarely seen species like the rufuos-vented ground cuckoo and the short-eared dog as well as odd behavior, like sloths licking salt from the ground. The compilation is produced by Diego Mosquera, manager and head of the camera trap program at Tiputini Biodiversity Station. Jeremy Hance -0.575146 -76.077377 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14609 2015-04-08T20:16:00Z 2015-04-08T20:29:08Z New group hopes to raise global profile of the peace-loving bonobo <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0408.bonobo.IMG_0595.thumb.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Of the world's six species of great ape (not including us), it's safe to say that bonobos (<i>Pan paniscus</i>) are the least studied and least known publicly. But a new organization, the Bonobo Project, is hoping to change that. To the untrained eye, a bonobo looks little different from their closest relative, the chimpanzee. But the differences between these two cousins are actually quite large. Jeremy Hance -2.337877 21.242508 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14485 2015-03-12T15:16:00Z 2015-03-12T15:24:19Z Meet Biomuseo: the world’s first biodiversity museum <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0302_biomuseo_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Biomuseo, designed by internationally renowned architect, Frank Gehry, is the first museum in the world dedicated to biodiversity. Opened in October 2014, the museum is located at the end of the Amador Causeway in Panama City, facing the Pacific Ocean at the entrance of the Panama Canal. Tiffany Roufs 8.932658 -79.545043 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14448 2015-03-03T15:58:00Z 2015-03-05T19:44:48Z Employing shame for environmental change <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0303.shame.bookcover.thumb.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Anyone who has ever felt the sting of shame, knows its power. Shame has long been used by societal institutions&#8212;families, communities, governments, religions&#8212;for making individuals tow the line of the majority. But a new book explores another&#8212;arguably more positive&#8212;side of shame: its potential to challenge rule-breaking and ethically-defunct corporations. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14350 2015-02-05T13:58:00Z 2015-02-05T14:25:16Z World Parks Congress talks the talk, but future depends on action <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/peru/150/manu_0177.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Last year, more than 6,000 people gathered for the World Parks Congress 2014, an event held around every ten years by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The World Parks Congress discusses myriad issues related to protected areas, which recent research has shown are in rough shape. Jeremy Hance -33.905271 151.144906 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14271 2015-01-16T19:46:00Z 2015-01-16T20:07:53Z Tree climbing as a tool to build respect for forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0116redwood150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The bulk of life in the rainforest is found the leafy layers of the canopy. But little was known about this world until relatively recently, when hobbyists, naturalists, and researchers began devising ways to access the upper levels of the forest. These efforts accelerated in the 1970s when scientists started to use mountaineering techniques and ropes to climb towering rainforest trees for long-term study and observation. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14266 2015-01-15T18:43:00Z 2015-01-15T19:15:23Z No experience necessary: how studying tamarins led to an innovative research organization in the Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0114_primates_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>While conducting doctoral research on tamarin reproductive biology in the Peruvian Amazon, Mrinalini Watsa realized she needed help in the field. Rather than hiring seasonal assistance she, along with Gideon Erkenswick, decided to create a life-changing non-profit organization, PrimatesPeru. The new NGO would allow students to conduct field research in one of the most biodiverse, yet threatened, places on Earth. Tiffany Roufs -12.195950 -72.133971 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14232 2015-01-07T17:38:00Z 2015-01-20T03:22:47Z How black rhinos and local communities help each other in Namibia <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/15/0107.Photo-1-(credit-Dave-Hamman-Photography)-_-A-desert-adapted-black-rhino-in-north-west-Namibia.150.gif" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Africa's rhinos are in a state of crisis. Poaching for their horn has resulted in the deaths of thousands of animals and pushed the continent's two species&#8212;the white and black rhino&#8212;against the wall. Yet, despite the crisis, there are pockets of rhino territory where poaching remains rare and rhinos live comparatively unmolested. Indeed, one of the brightest spots for rhinos is in Namibia. Jeremy Hance -18.820276 15.165756 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14231 2015-01-07T16:51:00Z 2015-01-07T17:00:05Z One clever ape: new book celebrates real-life Orangutan Houdini <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/15/0106_Laurel_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>An interview with Laurel Neme about her new children's book, Orangutan Houdini. When no one is looking, a gangly orangutan named Fu Manchu reaches into his mouth and pulls out a wire. Carefully, Fu, housed at the Henry Doorly Zoo in Nebraska, begins to pick the lock to his enclosure's door, and escapes! He and his orangutan cohort have the run of the zoo, until his keeper Jerry brings them all back home. Tiffany Roufs tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14206 2014-12-30T17:23:00Z 2014-12-31T16:23:26Z Meet Biofaces: the Facebook for wildlife enthusiasts <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1229.leonardo.thumb.98504.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Love wildlife? Wish you had a place online to share your photos, videos, and stories with other wild enthusiasts&#8212;kind of like a Facebook for wildlife lovers? Well, look no further than Biofaces, a new website meant to "make wildlife loving people happy," according to its creator, Leonardo Avelino Duarte. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14144 2014-12-11T17:10:00Z 2014-12-11T21:33:52Z New film highlights local resistance to Nicaragua's canal <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1211.grancanal._DSC0638.150jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>This fall, filmmakers Tom Miller and Nuin-Tara Key with Pretty Good Productions found themselves in Nicaragua where they heard about a stunning project: the Gran Canal. Approved last year, the canal is meant to compete with the Panama Canal to the south. Built by a Chinese company, it will cut through 278 kilometers, destroying forests and driving through the largest freshwater body in Central America. Jeremy Hance 12.163097 -83.692639 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14122 2014-12-05T17:51:00Z 2015-02-06T15:11:26Z How an indigenous community in Ecuador stood up to big oil - and won <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1205-thumb-Gualinga.png" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Sarayaku, a Kichwa indigenous people numbering 1,200 from the Ecuadorian Amazon, won a historic court case in 2012. The Inter-American Court of Human Rights ruled that the government of Ecuador must publicly apologize, consult with, and recompense the Sarayaku for allowing oil exploration by Argentine Compañia General de Combustibles on their territory without prior consultation Morgan Erickson-Davis -1.867031 -78.073814 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14077 2014-11-26T23:06:00Z 2014-12-01T17:36:27Z What we can learn from uncontacted rainforest tribes <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1126-mark-plotkin-ted150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>If you have ever wondered about the connection between hallucinogenic frogs, uncontacted peoples, conservation, and climate change &#8212; and who hasn't? &#8212; check out this TED talk from ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin. An ethnobotanist by training, Plotkin serves as President of the Amazon Conservation Team. Plotkin took a few minutes from his busy schedule to answer a few questions from Mongabay. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14074 2014-11-26T15:32:00Z 2014-12-01T20:32:45Z New calendar celebrates primates and raises money for their survival <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1125.primatescalendar.cover.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Humans, or Homo sapiens sapiens, are really just upright apes with big brains. We may have traded actual jungles for gleaming concrete and steel ones, but we are still primates, merely one member of an order consisting of sixteen families. We may have removed ourselves from our wilder beginnings, but our extant relatives&#8212;the world's wonderful primates&#8212;serve as a gentle living reminder of those days. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14050 2014-11-19T23:29:00Z 2015-02-05T18:38:28Z Jane Goodall: 5 reasons to have hope for the planet <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1119jane-freud150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Jane Goodall is not only arguably the most famous conservationist who ever lived, but also the most well-known and respected female scientist on the planet today. Her path to reach that stature is an unlikely as it is inspiring. Told to 'never give up' by her mother, Goodall set out in her 20s to pursue her childhood dream: to live with animals in Africa. By the time she was 26 she doing just this. Rhett Butler -4.701242 29.616242 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14038 2014-11-18T16:46:00Z 2014-11-18T17:08:24Z Using games to teach kids the value of nature and philanthropy <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1118jre150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Kids are spending more time using tablets and smart phones for learning and entertainment. But hours spent gaming, Tweeting, and playing on Instagram and Facebook, may mean less engagement with nature, potentially making it more difficult for conservation organizations to inspire and influence the next generation of donors and decision makers. Given the state of the world's environment, that is a troubling thought. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14029 2014-11-17T17:02:00Z 2014-11-18T02:28:09Z A nature photographer's dream: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1117Natalie-Cash-4413-Julie-Larsen-Maher-with-African-elephant-calf150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Julie Larsen Maher has what many wildlife photographers would consider a dream job: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a non-profit that runs five zoos and aquariums in New York City as well as numerous site-based field programs in the U.S. and overseas. As staff photographer, Maher helps tell the stories behind WCS's conservation work, which ranges from veterinary procedures with Bronx Zoo animals to working with local communities in remote parts of Zambia to protect wildlife. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14011 2014-11-12T17:58:00Z 2015-01-20T03:30:06Z Local people are not the enemy: real conservation from the frontlines <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/Heather_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Saving one of the world's most endangered primates means re-thinking conservation. When Noga Shanee and her colleagues first arrived in Northeastern Peru on a research trip to study the yellow-tailed woolly monkey (Oreonax flavicauda), she was shocked by what she observed. Tiffany Roufs -3.015252 -71.958190 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14003 2014-11-11T16:07:00Z 2014-11-11T20:35:59Z Chief Curiosity Correspondent tackles sexism, aids conservation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1107_graslie_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Have you ever been offered the job of your dreams without knowing you were being interviewed? Have you ever communicated with a 5-year-old about the wonders of Salmonella? Have you ever been disappointed not to have larvae hatching from your skin? If you answered yes to all three questions, then you are either Emily Graslie herself or you should subscribe to her YouTube channel. Immediately. Tiffany Roufs tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13963 2014-10-30T15:16:00Z 2014-10-30T16:16:40Z The Search for Lost Frogs: one of conservation's most exciting expeditions comes to life in new book <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/_MG_0205.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>One of the most exciting conservation initiatives in recent years was the Search for Lost Frogs in 2010. The brainchild of scientist, photographer, and frog-lover, Robin Moore, the initiative brought a sense of hope&#8212;and excitement&#8212;to a whole group of animals often ignored by the global public&#8212;and media outlets. Now, Moore has written a fascinating account of the expedition: In Search of Lost Frogs. Jeremy Hance 9.559564 76.929016 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13939 2014-10-24T15:41:00Z 2014-10-24T16:20:16Z When cute turns deadly – the story of a wildlife biologist who was bit by a venomous slow loris, and lived to tell the tale <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1024_george_madani_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Slow lorises are YouTube stars. A quick search on the website will greet you with several videos of these endearing little primates--from a slow loris nibbling on rice cakes and bananas, to a loris holding a tiny umbrella. Lady Gaga, too, tried to feature a slow loris in one of her music videos. But the loris nipped her hard, and she dropped her plans. This was probably for the best, because the bite of a slow loris is no joke. Being the only known venomous primate in the world, its bite can quickly turn deadly. Brittany Stewart 3.679069 114.851374 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13938 2014-10-23T14:45:00Z 2014-10-23T21:41:09Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Recognize the value of novel forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1022.Ariel-Lugo.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Think first before you eradicate non-native species says Dr. Ariel E. Lugo, the current director of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry within the USDA Forest Service, based in Puerto Rico. Lugo, an accomplished ecologist, supports the idea that both native and non-native plants have important roles to play in conservation efforts. Jeremy Hance 18.213006 -66.532471 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13927 2014-10-21T14:47:00Z 2014-12-30T22:30:02Z Saving Asia's other endangered cats (photos) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/LC_Ronglarp_HKK.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>It's no secret that when it comes to the wild cats of Asia&#8212;and, really, cats in general&#8212;tigers get all the press. In fact, tigers&#8212;down to an estimated 3,200 individuals&#8212;arguably dominate conservation across Asia. But as magnificent, grand, and endangered as the tigers are, there are a number of other felines in the region that are much less studied&#8212;and may be just as imperiled. Jeremy Hance 5.395824 117.268519 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13922 2014-10-20T14:08:00Z 2014-10-21T15:05:26Z Walking the walk: zoo kicks off campaign for orangutans and sustainable palm oil <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/kalteng_0897.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>If you see people wearing orange this October, it might not be for Halloween, but for orangutans. Chester Zoo’s conservation campaign, Go Orange for Orangutans, kicks off this month for its second year. The campaign aims to raise money, and awareness, for orangutans in Borneo, which have become hugely impacted by deforestation often linked to palm oil plantations. Jeremy Hance 53.224664 -2.884033 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13895 2014-10-09T16:27:00Z 2015-01-20T03:29:35Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Empower youth leaders <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://travel.mongabay.com/laos/150/laos_0717.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Want to save forests? Don't forget the youth, says Pedro Walpole, the Chair and Director of Research for the Environmental Science for Social Change, a Jesuit environmental research organization promoting sustainability and social justice across the Asia Pacific region. 'Youth leadership in environmental management is key,' Walpole told mongabay.com. Jeremy Hance 8.495517 123.303646 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13882 2014-10-07T14:37:00Z 2014-10-08T14:08:22Z Saving Peru's sea turtles and marine birds: conservationists and fishermen partner to tackle bycatch <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1006.prodelphinus.release.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Marine conservationists often view fisheries as an enemy of sorts, vacuuming up fish with little thought to the long-term consequences and using equipment that also ends up killing other species, i.e. bycatch like sea turtles and marine birds. However, Joanna Alfaro Shigueto, the President of the Peruvian NGOProDelphinus and winner of a 2012 Whitley Award, has chosen a different tact. Jeremy Hance -13.982917 -76.336242 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13859 2014-10-02T13:55:00Z 2014-12-30T22:30:56Z What makes the jaguar the ultimate survivor? New books highlights mega-predator's remarkable past and precarious future <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1002.thumbnail.9781597269964.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>For thousands of years the jaguar was a God, then it was vermin to be destroyed, and today it is the inspiration for arguably the most ambitious conservation effort on the planet. A new book by renowned big cat conservationist, Alan Rabinowitz, tells this remarkable story from the jaguar's evolutionary origins in Asia to its re-emergence today as a cultural and ecological symbol. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13743 2014-09-05T02:12:00Z 2014-09-05T11:28:23Z A path to becoming a conservation scientist <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0824-ysi-zuzana-burivalova-04_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The path to finding a career often involves twists and turns. Serendipity is important &#8212; one rarely anticipates what small events, chance occurrences, and seeds of inspiration will spur decisions that lead to pursuing one job or another. For Zuzana Burivalova, a PhD candidate based at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich), the road to becoming a tropical forest ecologist began as a child in a small Czech Republic village with a foldout children's book about rainforests. Rhett Butler 15.742693 50.043311 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13723 2014-08-27T23:55:00Z 2014-11-20T20:34:04Z Meeting an Illegal Logger <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0827logger150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>'I make six times the amount of money logging as I would working my small plot of land or even working legally in a pulp and paper or palm oil plantation.' An illegal logger explains the economic conditions in South Sumatra. Mongabay Special Reporting Fellow Robert S. Eshelman interviews an illegal logger in Indonesia on the topic of cleaning up commodity supply chains. Tiffany Roufs -3.483145 104.340247 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13688 2014-08-19T21:58:00Z 2014-12-30T22:35:16Z Why conservationists need a little hope: saving themselves from becoming the most depressing scientists on the planet <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/Panda-wearing-GPS-collar-CREDIT-China-Academy-of-Sciences.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Here's a challenge: take a conservationist out for a drink and ask them about their work. Nine times out of ten&#8212;or possibly more&#8212;you'll walk away feeling frustrated, despondent, and utterly hopeless. Yet a few conservation scientist are not just trying to save species from extinction, but also working to save their field&#8212;their life's work&#8212;from slipping into total despair. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13639 2014-08-07T17:56:00Z 2014-11-25T23:14:52Z The 90 Percent Diet: reducing our environmental impact by eating less meat <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0807-machovino4-thumb.jpeg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In Brian Machovina’s life, a serendipitous influence of people and places have all contributed to his current passion for inspiring people to eat less meat. With fewer grazing animals, Machovina’s studies show that we could make better conservation and production choices with land that would otherwise be used to raise or feed livestock. Morgan Erickson-Davis 9.470387 -83.342319 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13608 2014-07-30T17:05:00Z 2014-08-01T23:05:44Z The future of tropical biology research and conservation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0730AUS_7002150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Last week, the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) held its 51st annual meeting in Cairns, Australia. In addition to the normal symposia, plenaries, and poster sessions on a wide range of conservation topics, the convening produced a declaration calling for stronger protection of the Great Barrier Reef and two resolutions on expanding research funding in Papua New Guinea and >imploring Australia to restore its environmental leadership. Rhett Butler -16.927503 145.777812 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13590 2014-07-28T13:17:00Z 2014-12-30T22:37:36Z Short-eared dog? Uncovering the secrets of one of the Amazon's most mysterious mammals <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0727.2010.-Los-Amigos.-Oso-at-age-4-.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Fifteen years ago, scientists knew next to nothing about one of the Amazon's most mysterious residents: the short-eared dog. Although the species was first described in 1883 and is considered the sole representative of the Atelocynus genus, biologists spent over a century largely in the dark about an animal that seemed almost a myth. Jeremy Hance -11.888234 -71.407557 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13583 2014-07-24T16:34:00Z 2014-07-29T19:41:27Z Next big idea in forest conservation: Reconnecting faith and forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0724.Sacred-forest-grove-in-Kodagu-South-India.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>'In Africa, you can come across Kaya forests of coastal Kenya, customary forests in Uganda, sacred forest groves in Benin, dragon forests in The Gambia or church forests in Ethiopia...You can also come across similar forest patches in South and Southeast Asia including numerous sacred groves in India well-known for their role in conservation of biological diversity,' Dr. Shonil Bhagwat told mongabay.com. Jeremy Hance 12.362197 75.693899 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13523 2014-07-10T15:08:00Z 2014-07-10T15:26:56Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Rewards for reforestation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0710.louis.Dr.-Ed-Louis.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Susie McGuire and Dr. Edward Louis Jr. are the powerhouse team behind the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership (MBP), an NGO that involves local residents&#8212;both human and primate&#8212;in reforestation efforts in Madagascar. A conservation geneticist and veterinarian by training, Ed Louis has discovered 21 lemur species and successfully reintroduced two species of locally extinct lemurs back into the wild. Jeremy Hance -21.380746 47.867042 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13489 2014-07-03T16:52:00Z 2014-07-06T16:19:33Z Next big idea in forest conservation? The 'double-edged sword' of democracy <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0703.sheil.gorilla.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Dr. Douglas Sheil considers himself an ecologist, but his research includes both conservation and management of tropical forests. Currently teaching at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) Sheil has authored and co-authored over 200 publications including scholarly articles, books, and popular articles on the subject. Jeremy Hance -0.987945 29.672290 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13488 2014-07-03T16:12:00Z 2014-07-03T16:23:59Z A children's book inspired by murder: the 25th anniversary of 'The Great Kapok Tree' <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0703-kapok4-thumb.png" align="left"/></td></tr></table>“The Great Kapok Tree” was written by Lynne Cherry in response to the murder of Brazilian environmental activist Chico Mendes, who was assassinated by a rancher in 1988 in Brazil. Mendes’ murder was a significant international incident galvanizing support for environmental activists working to protect the Amazon forest. Morgan Erickson-Davis -4.759474, -55.773275 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13476 2014-07-01T16:13:00Z 2014-12-30T22:40:05Z On babies and motherhood: how giant armadillos are surprising scientists (photos) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0701.giantarmadillo.thumb.1-(24).150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Until ten years ago scientist's knowledge of the reproductive habits of the giant armadillo&#8212; the world's biggest&#8212; were basically regulated to speculation. But a long-term research project in the Brazilian Pantanal is changing that: last year researchers announced the first ever photos of a baby giant armadillo and have since recorded a second birth from another female. Jeremy Hance -15.849044 -56.212636 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13458 2014-06-26T20:07:00Z 2014-06-30T15:55:16Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Playing games to understand what drives deforestation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0626.garcia.innovations.IMGP0355.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Dr. Claude Garcia plays games, but you won’t find him betting his shirt at the casino. As leader of the Forest Management and Development Research Group at ETH Zürich, Garcia and his team use participatory modeling and role-playing games, merged with more traditional disciplinary sciences such as ecology, economics, and sociology to understand and manage complex landscape change in the tropics. Jeremy Hance 11.830113 75.908619 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13450 2014-06-26T04:45:00Z 2014-06-26T13:17:27Z Despite early headwinds, Indonesia's biggest REDD+ project moves forward in Borneo <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0625-rimba-ryra-deforestation150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Just over a year ago, the Indonesian government officially approved the country's first REDD+ forest carbon conservation project: Rimba Raya, which aims to protect more than 64,000 hectares of peat forest in Central Kalimantan. The approval came after years of delays from the Ministry of Forestry and a substantial reduction in the project's concession area. But InfiniteEarth, the firm behind the project, pressed on. Now a year later, Rimba Raya's is not only still in business, but is scaling up its operations. Rhett Butler -3.262548 112.030914 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13373 2014-06-12T16:51:00Z 2014-06-13T22:06:16Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Learning from innovations to make REDD+ work <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/062.duchelle.innovations.boy.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) in Brazil, Dr. Amy Duchelle coordinates research on the effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and co-benefits of REDD+ initiatives at the sub-national level in Latin America as part of CIFOR's Gloal Comparative Study on REDD+. Jeremy Hance -5.481673 -59.772298 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13361 2014-06-09T14:02:00Z 2014-12-30T22:42:00Z Bears, cats, and mystery mammals: camera traps in 'paper park' prove it's worth protecting <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0609.habitatid.Sun-bear.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Can a single photograph change the fate of a park? A new conservation group, HabitatID, believes so, and is putting this belief into action. Setting up camera traps in Cambodia's Virachey National Park, the group hopes that photos of charismatic and endangered species will help reinvigorate protection for a park that has been abandoned by conservation groups and underfunded by the government. Jeremy Hance 14.297357 107.049167 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13347 2014-06-05T20:16:00Z 2014-06-05T21:55:57Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Work locally, relentlessly, and, if necessary, ignore the government <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0605.fredriksson.Gabriella_bear-skull.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In 1997, Gabriella Fredriksson, then a young PhD student, was studying sun bears in East Kalamantan, Indonesia, when massive forest fires broke out in the park. 'It quickly became clear that there was no government agency, NGO, or private company in the area interested in assisting putting out these fires, which were threatening to burn down the entire reserve,' Fredriksson told mongabay.com. Jeremy Hance 1.459166 117.013715 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13321 2014-06-02T13:27:00Z 2014-06-03T14:18:01Z Of jaguars and loggers: new film to showcase one of the least-known regions in the deep Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0529.tristan.movie.light-trees.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In August, three young filmmakers will go on the expedition of a lifetime. They plan to spend six months filming in one of the most remote, most spectacular, and most endangered ecosystems on the planet: the Las Piedras River system. This unprotected swathe of Amazon jungle contains massive anacondas, prowling jaguars, and even uncontacted indigenous people. Jeremy Hance -12.184542 -69.374536 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13307 2014-05-29T12:47:00Z 2015-01-20T03:29:07Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Making community protection economically viable <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0528.tree.Other-Tanzania-411.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>After years of discovering new species and setting up protected areas, Neil Burgesses' career changed. Currently he is focused on community-driven conservation and on how to improve protected areas in Africa's Eastern Arc mountains region. Neil Burgess has worked in the conservation field for over twenty years, mainly in Tanzania where he also lived for five years. Jeremy Hance -6.067019 29.888210 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13277 2014-05-23T11:34:00Z 2014-05-23T13:37:04Z Indonesian activist: strong company commitments, media push government on forest issues <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0523SUM_4068150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Indonesia has become notorious for its high rate of forest loss, but there are nascent signs of progress. The central government has implemented a moratorium across some 14.5 million hectares of forest and peatlands, while a handful of Indonesian companies have adopted policies that establish social and environmental safeguards. Rhett Butler 0.810215 101.798923 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13273 2014-05-22T19:29:00Z 2014-05-22T21:13:32Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Linking public health and environmental degradation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0522.Madagascar2-061.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Dr. Christopher Golden is an explorer on a mission. As both an epidemiologist and ecologist, he is investigating and expanding the interface between human and ecosystem health. This year, Golden was appointed the Director of Wildlife Conservation Society's HEAL (Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages</a>) Program. Jeremy Hance -15.508300 49.598895 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13230 2014-05-15T17:34:00Z 2014-05-16T16:32:56Z Former Miss South Pacific steps into new conservation role <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0512_Amy150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Alisi Rabukawaqa, an articulate, vibrant, 26-year-old Fijian known in Oceania as Miss South Pacific 2011, has set her sights on a novel conservation program in Fiji. The Conservation Officer program, created in 2013, supports natural resource management within villages in Fiji and links them with the government arm overseeing the needs of indigenous Fijians. Mongabay.org Special Reporting Initiative Fellow Amy West sits down for an interview. Tiffany Roufs -17.865520 177.709233 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13132 2014-04-25T13:45:00Z 2014-04-25T19:42:46Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Crowdsourced forest monitoring <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0423.brazil_0395.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In the Brazilian Amazon, deforestation alerts are being submitted via smartphones. On the ground technicians send alerts to a database stored in 'the cloud.' This information is added to maps, which, along with satellite imagery, are used to inform law enforcement. And the speed of this process is getting real results. Jeremy Hance -11.091665 -57.459438 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13100 2014-04-18T18:11:00Z 2015-03-07T05:06:57Z Behind the scenes of Showtime's blockbuster series on climate change <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0418-harrison-ford-baby-orangutans150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>For years climate change activists and environmentalists have been clamoring for a high-profile, high-impact TV series about climate change to make Americans more aware of an issue that will affect billions of people around the globe in coming decades. This week they finally got it when Showtime released the first episode of <i>Years of Living Dangerously</i>, a big-budget TV series featuring a number of Hollywood's biggest stars as reporters and corespondents. Rhett Butler -0.078106 101.652189 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13098 2014-04-18T14:04:00Z 2014-04-18T14:18:22Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Maps for the masses <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay.s3.amazonaws.com/colombia/150/colombia_3985.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Mark Mulligan makes maps for the masses. In his work on tropical forests, Mulligan uses GIS, modeling, remote sensing, and lab experiments to turn research into datasets and policy support systems, which are available online for use in development, decision-making, and education. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13068 2014-04-10T21:53:00Z 2014-04-10T22:14:00Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Empowering everyone to watch over forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0410.NigelSizer_image.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Nigel Sizer has worked on the forefront of global forest issues for decades. Currently, he is the Global Director of the World Resource Institute's (WRI) Forests Program, whose projects include the Global Forest Watch, the Forest Legality Alliance, and the Global Restoration Initiative. These programs work with governments, businesses, and civil society with the aim of sustaining forests for generations to come. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13036 2014-04-04T17:31:00Z 2015-03-05T05:37:55Z Saving rainforests by buying them <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0404-Pronaturaleza_DiegoPerez150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>For more than twenty five years, an international non-profit known as the World Land Trust has been working to protect tropical forests through land purchase and partnerships with local groups. Last year, the U.S. arm of the group decided to rebrand itself as the Rainforest Trust to better convey its core mission to the outside world. Since then, the Rainforest Trust has launched its most ambitious project yet: conserving 5.9 million acres of tropical forest in Peru. Rhett Butler -8.067388 -73.444004 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13031 2014-04-03T21:11:00Z 2014-04-05T04:17:32Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Connecting deforestation to disease <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0403.gillespie.portait.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Thomas Gillespie is concerned with the connections between conservation and disease, with a particular emphasis on primates. Much of his research examines the places where humans and animals are at a high risk of exchanging pathogens, and how human-caused disturbances, such as deforestation, can change disease dynamics and impacts. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13021 2014-04-02T17:44:00Z 2014-12-30T22:50:21Z How locals and conservationists saved the elephants of Mali amidst conflict and poverty <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0402.mali.elephants.trunk.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>At a time when Africa's elephants are facing a relentless poaching crisis, one community has managed to safeguard their elephants in the most unlikely of places: Mali. In a country that has suffered from widespread poverty, environmental degradation, and, most recently, warfare, a collaboration between conservationists and the local community has kept Mali's elephants from extinction. Jeremy Hance 15.662697 -2.605392 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13019 2014-04-02T05:43:00Z 2015-03-05T04:43:45Z Bioluminescent bacteria expose toxic arsenic in Bangladesh <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0402ToothBrush_Tricorder150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A knob turns, and pure water streams from the faucet. In developed nations, this expectation borders on being a fundamental human right. Elsewhere in the world, tap water is a pipe dream, while finding potable groundwater can be a full-time occupation laced by lethal threats—such as arsenic contamination. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13017 2014-04-01T18:04:00Z 2014-04-10T13:20:01Z Ten years after Lost Africa: a retrospective on indigenous issues <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0401.e_hmr_02_MR.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Ten years ago, Cyril Christo and Marie Wilkinson photographed and wrote, a tribute to the expansive imagination of Africa's vast landscape, incredible people, and astonishing animals. As Marie and Cyril tell us below in this interview, now is the time to listen, consider, and conserve our ecology and our cultural relationships with the ecology that supports us each day. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12995 2014-03-27T21:41:00Z 2014-03-27T22:04:32Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Quantifying the cost of forest degradation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0327.Phil-w-stump-clipped.thumb.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>How much is a forest really worth? And what is the cost of forest degradation? These values are difficult to estimate, but according to Dr. Phillip Fearnside, we need to do a better job. For nearly forty years, Fearnside has lived in Amazonia doing ecological research, looking at the value of forests in terms of environmental or ecosystem services such as carbon storage, water cycling, and biodiversity preservation. Fearnside then works to convert these services into a basis for sustainable development for rural populations. Jeremy Hance -3.094940 -59.989343 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12958 2014-03-21T00:45:00Z 2014-03-27T22:01:55Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Offer health care for forest protection <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0320.health.Danzer_027545.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Dr. Kinari Webb has a superpower: the ability to provide high-quality health care in a remote and rural landscape. And she uses her power not only to save lives, but also to protect the remaining Bornean rainforests. Twenty-one years ago, Kinari Webb traveled to Borneo to work with orangutans. She witnessed the faltering health of both the people and the environment and saw that the two issues were inseparable. When families must choose between the health of their children and the health of the forest that supports them, everyone loses. But in the region of Gunung Palung National Park &#8212; where an estimated 10 percent of the world's orangutans live &#8212; illegal logging and slash and burn farming methods paid the bills and locals saw few alternatives. Kinari vowed to study medicine and return with more to offer. Jeremy Hance -0.961310 109.975687 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12939 2014-03-17T13:53:00Z 2014-12-03T06:29:27Z Mother of God: meet the 26 year old Indiana Jones of the Amazon, Paul Rosolie <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0316.rosolie.interview.10.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Not yet 30, Paul Rosolie has already lived a life that most would only dare dream of&#8212;or have nightmares over, depending on one's constitution. With the Western Amazon as his panorama, Rosolie has faced off jaguars, wrestled anacondas, explored a floating forest, mentored with indigenous people, been stricken by tropical disease, traveled with poachers, and hand-reared a baby anteater. It's no wonder that at the ripe age of 26, Rosolie was already written a memoir: Mother of God. Jeremy Hance -12.418030 -69.268917 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12891 2014-03-07T14:06:00Z 2014-03-08T07:51:29Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Privatizing conservation management <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0307.Sabah-2013-(6).150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Is it possible to equitably divide the planet’s resources between human and non-human societies? Can we ensure prosperity and rights both to people and to the ecosystems on which they rely? In the island archipelago of Indonesia, these questions become more pressing as the unique ecosystems of this global biodiversity hotspot continue to rapidly vanish in the wake of land conversion (mostly due to palm oil, poor forest management and corruption. For 22 years, Dr. Erik Meijaard has worked in Indonesia. Now, from his home office in the capitol city, Jakarta, he runs the terrestrial branch of an independent conservation consultancy, People and Nature Consulting International (PNCI). Jeremy Hance -0.785983 112.680982 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12849 2014-02-28T13:49:00Z 2014-03-03T15:34:39Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Integrating demand for food with the need to save wild areas <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0228.CIMG0024.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Will it be possible safeguard the world's remaining rainforests while feeding billions of more mouths, many demanding more meat and richer diets? Dr. Mitchell Aide's is a tropical ecologist interested in how patterns of land use and biodiversity are affected by economic and demographic changes. Addressing food production and policy, Aide believes, as well as the Millennium Development Goals related to hunger, poverty, and sustainability are critical to conservation. Jeremy Hance -10.660608 -56.868897 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12803 2014-02-21T06:29:00Z 2015-02-14T05:41:41Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Applying genomics to conservation issues <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0221RI1_9916150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Jaboury Ghazoul uses his expertise in plant ecology to address societal issues ranging from climate change adaptation to food production. He is excited about the use of genomics-- the study of hereditary information passed down through an organism’s genetic code--for conservation. And genomics are certainly a hot topic in modern ecology. Rhett Butler -4.648974 55.421112 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12787 2014-02-19T13:06:00Z 2014-12-30T22:53:29Z Two kids, one year, from the Amazon to the Arctic: the environmental adventure of a lifetime <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0128.kraft.family.DSC_6924.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Kraft family&#8212;Larry, Lauri, Jamie (age 8), and Jason (age 6)&#8212;are on the trip of a lifetime, a round-the-world tour with an environmental focus. Currently in India, the family has already made their way through the Amazon, Vietnam, Costa Rica, Australia, and the Galapagos, among other wild places. Still left on their itinerary: the Arctic. But the trip isn't all fun and games, instead the Kraft's are using the year abroad to learn first hand about global environmental issues and solutions. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12776 2014-02-14T18:36:00Z 2014-02-20T19:09:32Z Local communities key to saving the Critically Endangered Mexican black howler monkey <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0214Monkey150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>For conservation initiatives around the world, community involvement is often crucial. An additional challenge is how to conserve species once their habitats have become fragmented. A primatologist in Mexico is bringing these together in a celebration of a Critically Endangered primate species: the Mexican black howler monkey. In 2013 Juan Carlos Serio-Silva was part of a team that not only helped to secure the establishment of a protected area for the Mexican black howler monkey, but also engaged local communities in a week of festivities, dubbed the First International Black Howler Monkey Week. Tiffany Roufs 17.805899 -91.536226 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12775 2014-02-14T14:03:00Z 2015-01-18T06:06:23Z Next big idea in conservation? Recognizing we are our own obstacles <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0214sabah_2793_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Cynthia Ong is not satisfied with the conservation status-quo. Her work aims to bring people together to form new conservation paradigms around the idea that land, animals and people are indelibly and inextricably linked. Ong is a facilitator, organizer, and manager with over 20 years experience in socio-environmental justice, entrepreneurship, and community activism. She has served as founder, board director and CEO of numerous for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in both Southeast Asia and in the U.S. Rhett Butler 4.855628 116.844664 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12762 2014-02-11T20:33:00Z 2014-02-20T19:01:55Z Helping the Amazon's 'Jaguar People' protect their culture and traditional wisdom <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/matses150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Tribes in the Amazon are increasingly exposed to the outside world by choice or circumstance. The fallout of outside contact has rarely been anything less than catastrophic, resulting in untold extinction of hundreds of tribes over the centuries. For ones that survived the devastation of introduced disease and conquest, the process of acculturation transformed once proud cultures into fragmented remnants, their self-sufficiency and social cohesion stripped away, left to struggle in a new world marked by poverty and external dependence Rhett Butler -9.524914 -73.478279 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12741 2014-02-07T10:08:00Z 2015-01-18T05:12:58Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Incentivizing keeping primary forests intact <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0207BradshawHeadshotFrog150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Much of Dr. Corey Bradshaw's work has a singular aim: to keep primary habitats and functioning ecosystems intact. According to Bradshaw, the existing system of carbon trading rules needs to be changed so that primary forests are given a higher value than other forms of land use. 'Nothing, can replace primary vegetation, both in terms of biodiversity value and other ecosystem services.' Rhett Butler -34.920845 138.607095 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12709 2014-01-31T14:59:00Z 2014-01-31T15:17:00Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Connecting forest fragments <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/cr/150/costa-rica-d_0183.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Dr. Stuart Pimm is an expert in extinctions: why they happen, how fast they happen, and how they can be prevented. Reconnecting forest fragments and avoiding fragmentation, according to Pimm, are among the most crucial things we can do to conserve global biodiversity. His organization SavingSpecies identifies areas at-risk for extinctions and helps local organizations fundraise so they can protect and restore habitats and safeguard biodiversity. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12700 2014-01-29T14:40:00Z 2014-02-19T15:28:02Z Predator appreciation: how saving lions, tigers, and polar bears could rescue ourselves <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0129.Christo_scan_46.150..jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In the new book, In Predatory Light: Lions and Tigers and Polar Bears, authors Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, Sy Montgomery, and John Houston, and photographers Cyril Christo and Marie Wilkinson share with us an impassioned and detailed appeal to appreciate three of the world's biggest predators: lions, tigers, and polar bears. Through lengthy discussions, combining themes from scientific conservation to local community folklore, In Predatory Light takes us step by step deeper into the wild world of these awe-inspiring carnivores and their varied plight as they facedown extinction. Jeremy Hance 78.80198 15.948486 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12682 2014-01-24T18:34:00Z 2015-01-13T05:52:44Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Using drones to catch poachers, monitor forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0124Stitchedaerial-photosfromdrone150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>At the foothills of the Himalayas, elephants, rhinoceroses, and tigers stir in the green forests. Protecting and monitoring these animals and the health of tropical forests worldwide is a significant challenge, often requiring large amounts of time, money and risk. Fortunately, an affordable new tool is soaring into the conservation sphere: autonomous flying vehicles, or drones. Lian Pin Koh, is a founding director of the non-profit ConservationDrones.org, which builds capacity in the use of drones for conservation in the developing tropics. Rhett Butler 28.372069 81.488128 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12648 2014-01-17T00:43:00Z 2015-01-13T05:53:21Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Global road map to mitigate damage from roads <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay.s3.amazonaws.com/sabah/150/sabah_aerial_1827.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In the world of conservation, Dr. William Laurance is a household name. He has worked in tropical systems, worldwide, for over 25 years, publishing over 300 articles, five books and receiving numerous awards and honors for his work as a researcher, science communicator, and conservation practitioner, including one of Australia’s highest scientific honors, the Australian Laureate Award. Rhett Butler -16.817954 145.686668 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12623 2014-01-10T18:00:00Z 2015-01-06T05:29:39Z Next big idea in forest conservation? Integrating forest conservation, use, and restoration <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/cr/150/costa_rica_osa_0060.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The next big idea is to integrate the social and natural components of forest conservation, use of forest products, and restoration. In reality, these aspects are completely intertwined, but in practice they are completely separated. I believe (along with many others) that the scale at which we can begin to integrate these components is at the landscape scale. Rhett Butler 10.428887 -84.008548 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12538 2013-12-18T15:13:00Z 2013-12-20T15:17:04Z Using stories to connect people to biodiversity: an interview with Tara Waters Lumpkin, PhD <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1216interview150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In a world where extinctions are almost commonplace and global warming barely raises an eyebrow, very few of us can return to find the places we grew up in unsullied by development. Sometimes, all that is left of a favorite grove of trees or strip of forest are memories. Through Izilwane: Voices for Biodiversity Project, an online magazine for story-tellers, Tara Waters Lumpkin has succeeded in bringing together more than one hundred "eco-writers" who have shared their memories, highlighted environmental crises in their localities and raised their voices against habitat destruction. Tiffany Roufs tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12480 2013-12-04T16:39:00Z 2015-02-11T23:59:02Z Sky islands: exploring East Africa's last frontier <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1204.Taveta-two-horned-chameleon-(Kinyongia-tavetana),-South-Pare-Mts.-Tanzania.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The montane rainforests of East Africa are little-known to the global public. The Amazon and Congo loom much larger in our minds, while the savannas of East Africa remain the iconic ecosystems for the region. However these ancient, biodiverse forests&#8212;sitting on the tops of mountains rising from the African savanna&#8212;are home to some remarkable species, many found only in a single forest. A team of international scientists&#8212;Michele Menegon, Fabio Pupin, and Simon Loader&#8212;have made it their mission to document the little-known reptiles and amphibians in these so-called sky islands, many of which are highly imperiled. Jeremy Hance -12.077428 37.631686 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12476 2013-12-03T15:32:00Z 2015-02-11T23:58:43Z Animal Earth: exploring the hidden biodiversity of our planet <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1203.piper.P248.tif.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Most of the species on Earth we never see. In fact, we have no idea what they look like, much less how spectacular they are. In general, people can identify relatively few of their backyard species, much less those of other continents. This disconnect likely leads to an inability in the general public to relate to biodiversity and, by extension, the loss of it. One of the most remarkable books I have read is a recent release that makes serious strides to repair that disconnect and affirm the human bond with biodiversity. Animal Earth: The Amazing Diversity of Living Creatures written by Ross Piper, a zoologist with the University of Leeds, opens up the door to discovery. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12466 2013-12-02T13:37:00Z 2015-02-11T23:55:01Z New project works to raise the profile of the world's littlest bear <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1127.sun_bear_closeup.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The world's least-known bear also happens to be the smallest: sun bears (Helarctos malayanus), so called for the yellowish horseshoe mark on its chest, are found across Southeast Asia. But despite their telltale markings, super-long tongues, and endearing cuteness, sun bears remain little-studied and little-known compared to many of the region's other large mammals. Now, a new project is working to raise the profile of the sun bears of Borneo&#8212;Survival of the Sun Bears&#8212;which are a smaller subspecies of the mainland animals. Jeremy Hance 5.867777 117.94748 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12440 2013-11-25T14:18:00Z 2013-11-28T00:26:45Z New children's book celebrates the rich wildlife of Kibale National Park <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1125.Kibale-Cover.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>There are many ways in which people practice conservation. The most well-known are working to save species in the field or setting up protected areas. But just as important&#8212;arguably more important for long-term conservation success&#8212;is conservation education, especially with children. Anyone who grew up watching David Attenborough documentaries, reading Gerald Durrell books, or simply exploring ecosystems on their own can tell you how important it is to encounter the wonders of wildlife at a young age. And for many of us most of our first encounters with wild animals are in illustrated books. Eric Losh's new book, <i>The Chorus of Kibale</i>, not only provides an educational opportunity for children to become acquainted with the many animals in Kibale National park in Uganda&#8212;through wonderful pictures and sounds&#8212;but proceed also go directly to two conservation groups working in the region, U.N.I.T.E. for the environment and the Primate Education Network (PEN). Jeremy Hance 0.486407 30.38822 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12428 2013-11-21T16:38:00Z 2013-11-21T21:34:42Z Canopy crusade: world's highest network of camera traps keeps an eye on animals impacted by gas project <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1114interview150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Oil, gas, timber, gold: the Amazon rainforest is rich in resources, and their exploitation is booming. As resource extraction increases, so does the development of access roads and pipelines. These carve their way through previously intact forest, thereby interrupting the myriad pathways of the species that live there. For species that depend on the rainforest canopy, this can be particularly problematic. Tiffany Roufs -4.915833 -74.274903 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12353 2013-11-11T21:49:00Z 2013-11-11T22:00:56Z Redeeming REDD: a conversation with Michael Brown <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay.s3.amazonaws.com/sabah/150/sabah_aerial_2601.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In Redeeming REDD: Policies, Incentives and Social Feasibility for Avoided Deforestation, anthropologist Michael Brown relays a constructive critique of the contemporary aims, standards and modalities for mitigating climate change by reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD). Brown advocates for REDD as a viable mechanism for the long-term pro-poor conservation and restoration of tropical forests as well&#8212;but only if local forest dwellers and Indigenous. Peoples can join the negotiating table and act as forest stewards. Local people must first be empowered to make 'socially feasible' decisions that are necessary for their livelihoods and well-being. In other words, there can be no environmentalism without credible local leadership, which requires investment in capacity building at the local level for sustainable institutions. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12217 2013-10-21T13:30:00Z 2013-10-23T20:21:38Z Art, education, and health: holistic conservation group embarks on new chapter <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1020.performances.-rwanda-%C2%A9Julie-Ghrist.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>It's unlikely conservation organizations can survive if they are unwilling to embrace change: as an endeavor, conservation requires not just longterm planning, but also an ability to move proactively and fluidly to protect species and safeguard ecosystems. Environmental and education NGO, the Art of Conservation, is currently embarking on its biggest change since its foundation in 2006: moving away from its base in Rwanda, while leaving a legacy behind. Jeremy Hance -1.509716 29.486434 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12209 2013-10-16T18:47:00Z 2013-10-17T15:34:24Z Nature tours in Costa Rica: an economic alternative to palm oil? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1016Image-2-Owners150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Oil palm plantations have been rapidly expanding across the tropics for the better part of the past twenty years due to high returns from palm oil production. But palm oil isn't necessarily the most profitable form of land use in wildlife-rich areas, as one conservation entrepreneur is demonstrating in Costa Rica.David Lando Ramirez, a landowner in Sarapiqui, northeastern Costa Rica, has converted a small patch of oil palm into a thriving ecotourism business centered around people's love of the Central American nation's stunning diversity of birds. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12208 2013-10-16T18:24:00Z 2013-10-16T19:47:05Z Mammal-watching: one man's obsession to see the world's mammals <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1016mammals150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>There are more than 5,000 different mammal species across the globe, but with this number being dwarfed by the 10,000 bird species, it is little wonder that bird-watching has become the most common wildlife watching hobby in the world. While there are thousands of websites dedicated to ornithology enthusiasts, with information detailing the best places to see particular species and how to find them, similar resources about mammals remain scarce. Tiffany Roufs tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12201 2013-10-15T19:56:00Z 2013-10-16T01:16:34Z Environmental journalism: rich with stories but 'extremely under-resourced' <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1015-erik-hoffner150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Erik Hoffner is an environmental journalist and photographer whose work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including <i>Orion</i>, <i>The Sun</i>, <i>Northern Woodlands</i>, <i>Yale Environment 360</i>, <i>Earth Island Journal</i>, and <i>World Ark</i>. Recently two of his stories triggered strong public reactions: an expos&eacute; on damaging logging practices in Sweden and a photo feature on suburban fracking in Colorado. In an October interview with Mongabay.com, Hoffner discusses the fallout from these stories as well as his career in environmental journalism. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12182 2013-10-10T13:19:00Z 2015-02-11T23:44:10Z Tapirs, drug-trafficking, and eco-police: practicing conservation amidst chaos in Nicaragua <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/jordan.PICT0021.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Nicaragua is a nation still suffering from deep poverty, a free-flowing drug trade, and festering war-wounds after decades of internecine fighting. However, like any country that has been largely defined by its conflicts, Nicaragua possesses surprises that overturn conventional wisdom. Not the least of which is that the Central American country is still home to big, stunning species, including jaguars, giant anteaters, pumas, and the nation's heaviest animal, the Baird's tapir (<i>Tapirus bairdii</i>). Still, not surprisingly given the nation's instability, most conservationists have avoided Nicaragua. But tapir-expert Christopher Jordan, who has worked in the country for over four years, says he wouldn't have it any other way. Jeremy Hance 13.982629 -83.465123 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12158 2013-10-02T18:57:00Z 2015-02-11T23:43:51Z Unlikely success: how Zimbabwe has become a global leader in rhino conservation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1002.LRT-rhino-monitor,-Hence,-tracking-a-black-rhino-cow.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>With its collapsed economy, entrenched poverty, and political tremors, one would not expect that a country like Zimbabwe would have the capacity to safeguard its rhinos against determined and well-funded poachers, especially as just across the border South Africa is currently losing over two rhinos a day on average. And indeed, without the Lowveld Rhino Trust (LRT), rhinos in Zimbabwe would probably be near local extinction. But the LRT, which is centrally involved in the protection of around 90 percent of the country's rhinos in private reserves along with conservancy members, has proven tenacious and innovative in its battle to safeguard the nation's rhinos from the poaching epidemic. Jeremy Hance -20.541387 32.08162 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12152 2013-10-01T14:29:00Z 2015-02-11T23:43:44Z Bornean elephant meets palm oil: saving the world's smallest pachyderm in a fractured landscape <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/09._DSC2466.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In the Malaysian state of Sabah, where most conservation students are still foreigners&#8212;either European or American&#8212;Nurzahafarina Othman stands out: not only is she Malaysian, a Muslim, and a mother of a young daughter, but she's rapidly becoming a top researcher and champion for the world's smallest elephant: the Bornean elephant (<i>Elephas maximus borneensis</i>). Although sometimes described as a pygmy elephant, they still weigh 2,000 kilograms (4,400 pounds). The origin of these 'tiny' elephants in Malaysian Borneo have baffled scientists for decades. Jeremy Hance 5.515952 118.2988 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12148 2013-09-30T14:24:00Z 2015-02-11T23:43:09Z Samburu's lions: how the big cats could make a comeback in Kenya <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/ewaso.DSC_0584.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In 2009 conservationists estimated that less than 2,000 lions survive in Kenya, a drop of 26 percent in just seven years. In addition, the East Africa country continues to hemorrhage lions: around a hundred a year. Poaching, poisoning, and large-scale habitat loss has put lions on the defensive across Africa, but even countries once thought lion strongholds--like Kenya--have seen populations harried to devastation and in some cases local extinction. Shivani Bhalla, a fourth-generation Kenyan, is working to turnaround this trend in Samburu National Reserve. Jeremy Hance 0.615244 37.532769 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12083 2013-09-17T15:03:00Z 2015-02-11T23:39:02Z Lions rising: community conservation making a difference for Africa's kings in Mozambique <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0917.LICM-11--Newst-male-lion-in-the-area.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Everyone knows that tigers, pandas, and blue whales are threatened with extinction&#8212;but lions!? Researchers were shocked to recently discover that lion populations have fallen precipitously: down to around 30,000 animals across the African continent. While 30,000 may sound like a lot, this is a nearly 70 percent decline since 1960. In addition, lion populations are increasingly fragmented with a number of populations having vanished altogether. However, there is hope: one place where lion populations are actually on the rise is Niassa National Reserve in Mozambique. Here, lion populations have risen by around 60 percent in just seven years. In part this is due to the effort of Colleen and Keith Begg. Jeremy Hance -12.004398 37.446442 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12068 2013-09-12T14:12:00Z 2015-02-11T23:39:38Z Butchering nature's titans: without the elephant 'we lose an essential pillar in the ability to wonder' <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0911.christo.18_009_17.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Africa's elephant poaching crisis doesn't just threaten a species, but imperils one of humanity's most important links to the natural world and even our collective sanity, according to acclaimed photographers and film-makers, Cyril Christo and Marie Wilkinson. Authors of the book Walking Thunder - In the Footsteps of the African Elephant, Christo and Wilkinson have been documenting Africa's titans in photos and film for several years. In 2011, the pair released a film Lysander's Song (named after their son an avid fan of elephants) which depicts the millennial-old relationship between humans and elephants. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12036 2013-09-10T13:57:00Z 2015-02-11T23:39:57Z Protecting predators in the wildest landscape you've never heard of <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0910.DSC_3198lion2bw-.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Serengeti, the Congo, the Okavango Delta: many of Africa's great wildernesses are household names, however on a continent that never fails to surprise remain vast wild lands practically unknown to the global public. One of these is the Ruaha landscape: covering 51,800 square kilometers (20,000 square miles) of southern Tanzania's woodlands and savannah, Ruaha contains the largest population of elephants in East Africa, over 500 bird species, and a wealth of iconic top predators, including cheetah, hyena, wild dogs, leopard, and&#8212;the jewel in its crown&#8212;10 percent of the world's lions. But that's not all, one of Africa's least-known and secretive tribal groups, the Barabaig, also calls Ruaha home. Jeremy Hance -7.490133 35.01646 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12034 2013-09-09T15:26:00Z 2013-09-17T15:22:43Z A year after devastating attack, security returns to the Okapi Wildlife Reserve (photos) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0905.Okapi-Giluka.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>On June 24th of last year, MaiMai Simba rebels, led by an elephant poacher known as Morgan, launched a devastating attack on the headquarters of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve in Epulu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The attack, which was reportedly in response to a crack down on poaching and illegal mining in the park, left buildings burned, equipment destroyed, and six people dead including two rangers. The militia also left with 28 women hostages, many of them minors. As if to add insult to injury, the militia didn't leave until they shot dead all 14 captive okapis at the headquarters, which were used as wildlife ambassadors for the local community. Jeremy Hance 1.402248 28.577144 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11960 2013-08-26T12:38:00Z 2015-02-11T23:16:32Z Trinidad and Tobago: a biodiversity hotspot overlooked <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0825.400px-Blue-crowned_Motmot_back_2.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The two-island nation of Trinidad and Tobago in the Caribbean (just off the coast of Venezuela) may be smaller than Delaware, but it has had an outsized role in the history of rainforest conservation as well as our understanding of tropical ecology. Home to an astounding number of tropical ecosystems and over 3,000 species and counting (including 470 bird species in just 2,000 square miles), Trinidad and Tobago is an often overlooked gem in the world's biodiversity. Jeremy Hance 10.441897 -61.227036 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11900 2013-08-12T12:16:00Z 2015-02-11T23:15:14Z Little NGO takes on goliath task: conserving the vanishing ecosystems of Paraguay <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0812.Forest-Guards-in-Cerrado-%C2%A9Rolex-Awards_Kirsten-Holst.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Landlocked in the navel of South America, the forests, wetlands and savannahs of Paraguay boast rich biodiversity and endemic species, yet the unique landscapes of Paraguay also face increasing threats, primarily from agricultural expansion. Controlled burns and clear cutting have become common practice as wildlands are converted for soy and cattle production. In some areas this land conversion is rapid: the Paraguayan Chaco, for instance, is being lost at a rate of 10% per year. One organization is working to reverse this trend. Para La Tierra (PLT) is a small NGO dedicated to the conservation of threatened habitats in Paraguay. Located on the Reserva Natural Laguna Blanca, in-between two of South America's most threatened habitats: the Atlantic Forest and the vast topical savannah known as the cerrado, PLT is in a unique position to champion conservation. Jeremy Hance -23.809729 -56.283653 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11878 2013-08-05T12:51:00Z 2013-08-05T22:50:28Z Journey to the Edge of Eden: the struggle to preserve Southwest Florida <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0804.Florida-panther-with-radio-collar-crossing-road-in-Big-Cypress-area.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Gary Schmelz, in a Journey to the Edge of Eden, takes us through a wonderful personal account of the conservation history of Southwest Florida. Journey to the Edge of Eden is one part personal memoir similar to the English naturalist Gerald Durrell and one part Florida conservation history. With hilarious stories of unintended naturalist misadventures and recounting conservation “as it happened,” a Journey to the Edge of Eden is one of those rare books you read in a coffee shop and with gusto and pride while laughing along out loud at Gary Schmelz stories. Jeremy Hance 25.894284 -81.329838