tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/indigenous%20reserves1 indigenous reserves news from mongabay.com 2014-12-30T22:26:03Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/14115 2014-12-04T21:26:00Z 2014-12-30T22:26:03Z Giant stone face unveiled in the Amazon rainforest (video) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1204.stoneface.1.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A new short film documents the journey of an indigenous tribe hiking deep into their territory in the Peruvian Amazon to encounter a mysterious stone countenance that was allegedly carved by ancient peoples. According to Handcrafted Films, which produced the documentary entitled The Reunion, this was the first time the Rostro Harakbut has been filmed. Jeremy Hance -12.820287 -71.013726 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12718 2014-02-04T12:57:00Z 2014-02-20T19:10:42Z Gas company to drill in Manu National Park buffer zone, imperiling indigenous people The Peruvian government has approved plans for gas company Pluspetrol to move deeper into a supposedly protected reserve for indigenous peoples and the buffer zone of the Manu National Park in the Amazon rainforest. The approval follows the government rescinding a highly critical report on the potential impacts of the operations by the Culture Ministry (MINCU), the resignation of the Culture Minister and other Ministry personnel, and repeated criticism from Peruvian and international civil society. Jeremy Hance -11.813588 -72.499695 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12596 2014-01-06T13:35:00Z 2014-02-20T19:13:53Z Brazil begins evicting illegal settlers from hugely-imperiled indigenous reserve Months after closing sawmills on the fringes of an indigenous reserve for the hugely-imperiled Awá people, the Brazil government has now moved into the reserve itself to evict illegal settlers in the eastern Amazon. According to the NGO Survival International, Brazil has sent in the military and other government agents to deal with massive illegal settlements on Awá land for logging or cattle. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11799 2013-07-22T14:12:00Z 2015-01-20T03:31:47Z Weak laws governing Malaysia's indigenous people complicate conservation efforts <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0722.orangasli.P1000684.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The balance between biodiversity conservation, land acquisition, natural resource utilization and indigenous peoples is often wrought with conflict. Legislation governing the use of natural resources should ideally protect biodiversity and address the needs of indigenous peoples, but in many places, falls short of these ambitions. In a recent study published in Biodiversity Conservation, researchers examined the weaknesses in select natural resource laws that affect the indigenous peoples of Peninsular Malaysia, and compared these laws with data on a specific group of indigenous people’s use of natural resources, collected through questionnaires. In addition to suggesting potential solutions to address legislative weaknesses, the researchers make a strong case for why natural resource legislation is a matter of concern for conservationists. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11788 2013-07-18T19:37:00Z 2013-07-20T00:32:32Z Brazil's military takes on illegal loggers to protect nearly-extinct tribe Brazil has launched a military campaign to evict illegal loggers working from the fringes of an indigenous reserve home to the Awá people, reports Survival International. Inhabiting the Amazon rainforest in northeastern Brazil, only around 450 Awá, also known as Guajá, survive today, and around a quarter of these have chosen voluntary isolation. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11639 2013-06-24T22:13:00Z 2013-06-26T18:13:38Z Over 30 tons of explosives to be detonated in Manu National Park buffer zone A consortium of gas companies headed by Pluspetrol and including Hunt Oil plans on detonating approximately 38 tons of explosives in the south-east Peruvian Amazon in one of the most biodiverse regions in the world. The detonations are part of 2D and 3D seismic tests planned by Pluspetrol in its search for new gas deposits in the Camisea region&#8212;plans that are currently pending approval by Peru's Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM). Jeremy Hance -11.697962 -71.85379 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11443 2013-05-16T14:08:00Z 2013-05-19T03:58:31Z NGO: conflict of interests behind Peruvian highway proposal in the Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0516.map.highway.peru.globalwitness.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>As Peru's legislature debates the merits of building the Purús highway through the Amazon rainforest, a new report by Global Witness alleges that the project has been aggressively pushed by those with a financial stake in opening up the remote area to logging and mining. Roads built in the Amazon lead to spikes in deforestation, mining, poaching and other extractive activities as remote areas become suddenly accessible. The road in question would cut through parts of the Peruvian Amazon rich in biodiversity and home to indigenous tribes who have chosen to live in "voluntary isolation." Jeremy Hance -9.688752 -70.695877 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11267 2013-04-17T23:55:00Z 2013-04-18T01:03:16Z Brazil threatens $282m in fines for beef linked to Amazon deforestation Federal prosecutors in Brazil are threatening to fine 26 beef producers $282 million for buying cattle raised in illegally deforested areas and on Indian reservations, reports Reuters. Rhett Butler -11.480025 -55.722656 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11099 2013-03-25T17:34:00Z 2013-03-25T17:44:09Z Indigenous protester killed by masked assailants in Panama over UN-condemned dam <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0325.boulders.panamadam.DSCF1153.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A Ngäbe indigenous Panamanian, Onesimo Rodriguez, opposing the Barro Blanco hydroelectric dam project was killed last Friday evening by four masked men. His body was then thrown into a nearby stream where it was discovered the following day. Onesimo Rodriguez was attacked with a companion in Las Nubes, after they had attended a demonstration in Cerro Punta, Bugaba, against the dam. His companion, whose identity is being withheld for security reasons, received serious injuries but managed to escape and is having his injuries tended to by the local indigenous community. Jeremy Hance 8.248612 -81.668859 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10079 2012-08-30T17:32:00Z 2012-09-04T19:33:07Z Indigenous groups in Panama wait for UN REDD to meet promises <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/panama/150/panama_0184.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A dispute over the implementation of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) in Panama has pitted the United Nations (UN) against the nation's diverse and large indigenous groups. Represented by the National Coordinator of Indigenous Peoples in Panama (COONAPIP), indigenous groups charge that the UN has failed to meet several pledges related to kick-starting REDD+ with their support, including delaying a $1.79 million payment to the group to begin REDD+-related activities. The on-going dispute highlights the perils and complexities of implementing REDD+, especially concerns that the program might disenfranchise indigenous groups who have long been the stewards of their forest territories. Jeremy Hance 9.001061 -79.533577 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10078 2012-08-30T16:37:00Z 2012-09-11T01:24:01Z Survivors say gold miners in helicopter massacred village of 80 in Venezuelan Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/peru/150/peru_aerial_1470.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Up to 80 people have been massacred by gold miners in the remote Venezuelan Amazon, according to reports received by the indigenous-rights group, Survival International. According to Reuters, the reports have prompted the Venezuelan government to investigate the alleged murders of the Yanomami isolated community. According to three indigenous survivors, sometime in July a helicopter and what-are-believed to be illegal goldminers massacred the Yanomami community of Irotatheri. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10005 2012-08-14T15:28:00Z 2012-08-15T21:41:43Z Evidence of 'isolated' indigenous people found in Peru where priest is pushing highway Evidence of indigenous people living in "voluntary isolation" in a remote part of the Amazon has been found where an Italian Catholic priest is campaigning for Peru’s government to build a highway. The discovery is controversial because the priest has questioned the existence of the isolated people, sometimes referred to as uncontacted, who live without regular contact with anyone else. Jeremy Hance -9.766243 -70.71629 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9945 2012-07-31T16:21:00Z 2012-08-16T13:57:25Z Human rights court favors indigenous tribe over Ecuadorian government in oil battle The Inter-American Court of Human Rights has found in favor of a Kichwa community's right to consultation prior to industrial projects on their land in a ruling that could have implications for many indigenous peoples across the Americas. The court found that the government of Ecuador violated the indigenous people's rights by allowing the Argentine oil company, Compania General de Combustibles (CGC), on their land without proper consultation. Jeremy Hance -1.521428 -75.509949 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9873 2012-07-23T10:03:00Z 2015-02-08T23:12:26Z Smartphones promoted as a tool for indigenous forest protection Smartphones beeping in the woods may be a welcome presence that augurs the increased ability of indigenous communities to be stewards of their own biodiverse forests. Representatives of these communities and their supporters have advocated that international conservation policies like Reduced Emissions through Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) be increasingly managed by the communities themselves. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9861 2012-07-18T17:06:00Z 2012-07-18T17:23:35Z Brazil cripples illegal gold mining operations in indigenous territory Brazilian police have arrested 26 people and confiscated gold and aircraft in a coordinated effort to tackle illegal gold-mining in the Yanomami Indigenous Reserve, reports the BBC. Along with illegal miners the year-long investigation also arrested complicit airplane pilots, engineers, and business people in a bid to undercut the trade's funders and infrastructure. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9596 2012-05-31T14:37:00Z 2015-02-05T01:21:57Z Indigenous rights rising in tropical forests, but big gaps remain <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/papua/150/papua_0487.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In the last twenty years, rights for indigenous forest dwellers have expanded significantly, according to a new report by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI). Covering nearly thirty tropical forest countries, the report finds that indigenous people now hold rights to 31 percent of the forest land in these countries, rising from 21 percent in 1992. However, landmark land rights for indigenous people remain imperiled by lack of enforcement, land-grabbing, government ambivalence, and industrial development. The report comes less than a month before the Rio+20 Summit on Sustainable Development, a meeting of global leaders that marks two decades since the Rio Earth Summit. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9420 2012-04-19T16:29:00Z 2015-03-07T05:02:54Z Photos: Uncontacted Amazon tribes documented for first time in Colombia <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/12/0419-uncontacted_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Aerial surveys of a remote area of rainforest along the Colombia-Brazil border have produced the first photographic evidence of uncontacted tribes, according to a conservation group that works to safeguard indigenous territories and culture. The photos, released by the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), show five long houses or <i>malokas</i> thought to belong to two indigenous groups, the Yuri or Carabayo and Passé, some of the last isolated tribes in the Colombian Amazon. The images provide confirmation that uncontacted communities still exist within the Rio Puré National Park, which protects a million hectares (2.47 million acres) of mostly pristine rainforest between the Caquetá and Putumayo River basins along the Brazilian border. Rhett Butler -1.87009 -69.859314 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8308 2011-08-21T22:01:00Z 2015-01-28T23:49:49Z Protected areas that allow local use better at reining in tropical deforestation Protected areas in tropical forests are better at curtailing deforestation if they allow 'sustainable use' by locals, according to a new World Bank study published in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. Looking at every official protected area in the tropics from 2000 to 2008, researchers found that multi-use reserves in Latin America and Asia lowered deforestation rates by around 2 percent more than strict protected areas, though the effect was less visible in Africa. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5350 2009-12-22T23:31:00Z 2015-01-20T23:40:28Z The real Avatar story: indigenous people fight to save their forest homes from corporate exploitation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/0619peru150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In James Cameron's newest film <i>Avatar</i> an alien tribe on a distant planet fights to save their forest home from human invaders bent on mining the planet. The mining company has brought in ex-marines for 'security' and will stop at nothing, not even genocide, to secure profits for its shareholders. While Cameron's film takes place on a planet sporting six-legged rhinos and massive flying lizards, the struggle between corporations and indigenous people is hardly science fiction. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5250 2009-12-09T00:36:00Z 2009-12-09T01:01:52Z Brazilian tribe owns carbon rights to Amazon rainforest land <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/1208surui150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A rainforest tribe fighting to save their territory from loggers owns the carbon-trading rights to their land, according to a legal opinion released today by Baker & McKenzie, one of the world’s largest law firms. The opinion, which was commissioned by Forest Trends, a Washington, D.C.-based forest conservation group, could boost the efforts of indigenous groups seeking compensation for preserving forest on their lands, effectively paving the way for large-scale indigenous-led conservation of the Amazon rainforest. Indigenous people control more than a quarter of the Brazilian Amazon. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5177 2009-11-29T22:43:00Z 2009-12-04T15:28:53Z Ethnographic maps built using cutting-edge technology may help Amazon tribes win forest carbon payments <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/1130act150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A new handbook lays out the methodology for cultural mapping, providing indigenous groups with a powerful tool for defending their land and culture, while enabling them to benefit from some 21st century advancements. Cultural mapping may also facilitate indigenous efforts to win recognition and compensation under a proposed scheme to mitigate climate change through forest conservation. The scheme—known as REDD for reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation—will be a central topic of discussion at next month's climate talks in Copenhagen, but concerns remain that it could fail to deliver benefits to forest dwellers. Rhett Butler