tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/indigenous%20cultures1 indigenous cultures news from mongabay.com 2014-11-09T16:52:49Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13987 2014-11-06T18:51:00Z 2014-11-09T16:52:49Z Indigenous uprising earned tribe territories, but greatest challenges lie ahead <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1007_panama_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In 1925, Nele Kantule led a revolution that would make Guna Yala an independent and sovereign indigenous territory within Panama. Since then, the Guna have maintained a way of life that has allowed them to preserve their natural resources and mainland forest to an exceptional degree. But today, like many indigenous groups around the world, the Guna face some of their greatest challenges yet: the impacts of climate change, encroaching outside influences, and a younger generation that many elders feel is drifting from its roots. Tiffany Roufs 9.548827 -78.839226 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13968 2014-10-31T19:10:00Z 2014-11-07T16:26:48Z Between the Forest and the Sea: The Yarsuisuit Collective - Part II <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/1031_01_guerra_kuna_yala150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In this multimedia piece by SRI fellow Bear Guerra, we follow Andrés de León and the Yarsuisuit collective, a group of men who grow and harvest food sustainably in the Guna mainland forest. They also run a store on the island of Ustupu that helps support their families, serving as a model for the wider community. Tiffany Roufs 9.548827 -78.839226 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13947 2014-10-27T18:19:00Z 2014-11-07T16:26:06Z Between the forest and the sea: life and climate change in Guna Yala - Part I <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0904_04_guerra_kuna_yala150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The island-dwelling Guna people of Panama are one of the most sovereign indigenous communities in the world, but now severe weather and sea level rise are causing regular flooding on many of the islands, and will likely force the Guna to have to abandon their island homes for the mainland. This multimedia piece offers an introduction to everyday life and customs in Guna Yala and touches upon the uncertain future the Guna are now facing thanks to the impacts of climate change. Tiffany Roufs 9.548827 -78.839226 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13737 2014-09-04T16:45:00Z 2014-09-08T16:42:57Z REDD+ versus indigenous people? Why a tribe in Panama rejected pay for their carbon-rich forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0904_04_guerra_kuna_yala150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>There isn’t a word or phrase in the Kuna language for "carbon trading,” and much less for something as complex as REDD+. Standing for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation, REDD+ is the worldwide UN-backed climate change mitigation scheme that relies on carbon trading within forest landscapes to fund forest conservation programs. And yet, since 2008, the Kuna people have been hearing lots about it and referring to it often in their private conversations. Tiffany Roufs 9.548827 -78.839226 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13017 2014-04-01T18:04:00Z 2014-04-10T13:20:01Z Ten years after Lost Africa: a retrospective on indigenous issues <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0401.e_hmr_02_MR.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Ten years ago, Cyril Christo and Marie Wilkinson photographed and wrote, a tribute to the expansive imagination of Africa's vast landscape, incredible people, and astonishing animals. As Marie and Cyril tell us below in this interview, now is the time to listen, consider, and conserve our ecology and our cultural relationships with the ecology that supports us each day. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11288 2013-04-23T13:10:00Z 2013-04-23T13:13:18Z Featured video: Earth Day message from indigenous tribes in the Peruvian Amazon A new video by Alianza Arkana includes an Earth Day message from the indigenous peoples in the Peruvian Amazon who are facing the existential threats of logging and fossil fuel development on their traditional lands. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11099 2013-03-25T17:34:00Z 2013-03-25T17:44:09Z Indigenous protester killed by masked assailants in Panama over UN-condemned dam <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0325.boulders.panamadam.DSCF1153.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A Ngäbe indigenous Panamanian, Onesimo Rodriguez, opposing the Barro Blanco hydroelectric dam project was killed last Friday evening by four masked men. His body was then thrown into a nearby stream where it was discovered the following day. Onesimo Rodriguez was attacked with a companion in Las Nubes, after they had attended a demonstration in Cerro Punta, Bugaba, against the dam. His companion, whose identity is being withheld for security reasons, received serious injuries but managed to escape and is having his injuries tended to by the local indigenous community. Jeremy Hance 8.248612 -81.668859 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11040 2013-03-14T20:06:00Z 2013-04-03T13:25:53Z Into the unknown mountains of Cambodia: rare birds, rice wine, and talk of tigers <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0314.virachey.2013-01-23-17.23.49.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Ringed with forested mountains forming the borders with Laos and Vietnam, the northeast corner of Cambodia has been an intriguing blank spot among my extensive travels through the country. Nestled up against this frontier is Virachey National Park, created in 1993. I began searching for a way to explore this area a couple of years ago, hoping to connect with conservation NGOs to get me into the park; no one seemed to know much about it. I learned that the area had been written off by these groups due to massive land concessions given to logging and rubber concerns. The World Bank abandoned its 8-year effort to create a management scheme for Virachey after the concessions were granted in 2007. A moratorium on the concessions is temporarily in place, but illegal logging incursions into the park continue. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11031 2013-03-12T15:38:00Z 2013-03-13T15:32:50Z Photographers threatening the already-abused slender loris <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0312.Captured-Slender-Loris-Image-taken-as-per-the-local-inputs.-(c)-Arun-Kanagavel.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Caught in a beam of torchlight, the eyes of the slender loris reflect back a striking glow. In an effort to better understand these shy, nocturnal primates, a team of researchers set out to the Western Ghats of India. The resulting paper: <i>Moolah, Misfortune or Spinsterhood? The Plight of the Slender Loris (Loris lydekkerianus) in Southern India</i> was published in the <i>Journal of Threatened Taxa</i> in January of 2013. Forest walks and interviews with the Kani people, who live in close proximity to the lorises, supported evidence of a surprising new threat to the lorises: photographers. Jeremy Hance 12.972442 75.541077 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10881 2013-02-14T19:28:00Z 2013-02-23T23:54:08Z Indigenous knowledge reveals widespread mammal decline in northern Australia <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0214.nquoll_Ian-Morris.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Over the course of four years, a team of elite Australian researchers journeyed through the remote landscapes of Northern Australia to tap a vanishing resource: the wealth of knowledge carried by the indigenous inhabitants. Their study, published this year in Biological Conservation concludes that there have been major declines in native Northern Australian mammals, and also suggests a relationship between the decline of Indigenous knowledge and the decline of biodiversity. Jeremy Hance -13.346865 134.274902 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10463 2012-11-28T18:48:00Z 2013-02-05T15:15:15Z Reduction in snow threatens Arctic seals <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/Pusa_hispida_pup.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Arctic snowfall accumulation plays a critical role in ringed seal breeding, but may be at risk due to climate change, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters. Sea ice, which is disappearing at an alarming rate, provides a crucial platform for the deep snow seals need to reproduce. Ringed seals (Phoca hispida) require snow depths of at least 20 centimeters (8 inches): deep enough to form drifts that seals use as birth chambers. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9873 2012-07-23T10:03:00Z 2012-07-30T17:24:50Z Smartphones promoted as a tool for indigenous forest protection Smartphones beeping in the woods may be a welcome presence that augurs the increased ability of indigenous communities to be stewards of their own biodiverse forests. Representatives of these communities and their supporters have advocated that international conservation policies like Reduced Emissions through Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) be increasingly managed by the communities themselves. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9698 2012-06-19T22:33:00Z 2012-08-29T03:22:08Z Traditional belief in mythical beasts help protect forests Cultural practices including beliefs in mythical beasts and animals that dance have helped maintain forests in the West African country of the Gambia and Malaysian Borneo, said a researcher from Oxford University speaking at the annual meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation in Bonito, Brazil. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9475 2012-05-03T17:19:00Z 2012-12-02T22:30:15Z Exploring Asia's lost world <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/mccann.waterdragon.P1070954.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Abandoned by NGOs and the World Bank, carved out for rubber plantations and mining by the Cambodian government, spiraling into a chaos of poaching and illegal logging, and full of endangered species and never-explored places, Virachey National Park may be the world's greatest park that has been written off by the international community. But a new book by explorer and PhD student, Greg McCann, hopes to change that. Entitled Called Away by a Mountain Spirit: Journey to the Green Corridor, the book highlights expeditions by McCann into parts of Virachey that have rarely been seen by outsiders and have never been explored scientifically, including rare grasslands that once housed herds of Asian elephants, guar, and Sambar deer, before poachers drove them into hiding, and faraway mountains with rumors of tigers and mainland Javan rhinos. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9420 2012-04-19T16:29:00Z 2013-02-24T01:48:37Z Photos: Uncontacted Amazon tribes documented for first time in Colombia <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/12/0419-uncontacted_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Aerial surveys of a remote area of rainforest along the Colombia-Brazil border have produced the first photographic evidence of uncontacted tribes, according to a conservation group that works to safeguard indigenous territories and culture. The photos, released by the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), show five long houses or <i>malokas</i> thought to belong to two indigenous groups, the Yuri or Carabayo and Passé, some of the last isolated tribes in the Colombian Amazon. The images provide confirmation that uncontacted communities still exist within the Rio Puré National Park, which protects a million hectares (2.47 million acres) of mostly pristine rainforest between the Caquetá and Putumayo River basins along the Brazilian border. Rhett Butler -1.87009 -69.859314 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9308 2012-03-26T14:20:00Z 2012-03-26T14:46:25Z Indigenous groups fight for recognition and illumination in Peru <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/patrickleflufy.P1000083.1.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>"Shh, wait here," Wilson told me. I ducked down behind the buttress of a large tree to wait. We had been walking through the jungle for a few hours. At first we followed a path through the undergrowth, a wet world of ferns, trunks and lianas speckled with the sunlight that made it down through the canopy and understory, but soon we simply walked along a route Wilson picked out. I had been trying to concentrate on the myriad sounds: cicadas were the background and various small birds tweeted from different points. We were listening and looking for signs that would lead us to prey&#8212;perhaps the calm whistle of a perdiz or the scent&#8212;marking of a boar&#8212;but just before Wilson became excited I had heard nothing. He stopped and said, "Red monkeys," pointing ahead. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9046 2012-02-02T21:35:00Z 2012-02-02T21:35:22Z Supernatural beliefs keep hunting sustainable on Indonesian island How do indigenous communities hunt without pushing target species to local extinction? In other words, how have communities retained sustainable practices over countless generations. One answer is given in a new study by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and the Center for International Research in Agronomy and Development (CIRAD): supernatural beliefs. Looking at a community of indigenous people on the Indonesian island of Seram, researchers found that supernatural hunting beliefs ensured animals never vanished for good. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8923 2012-01-05T17:16:00Z 2012-01-05T17:41:22Z Will Taiwan save its last pristine coastline? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/fidenci.taiwan.coastline.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Voters in the January 14 Taiwanese presidential election will decide the fate of the island’s last pristine wilderness known as the Alangyi Trail. Amongst the three candidates, only one (Tsai Ing-wen from the Democratic Progressive Party) may support the conservation of Alangyi Trail and its coastline. One of the top domestic stories of 2011 were the efforts by the Pingtung County government, indigenous tribes, and NGOs to preserve the Alangyi Trail, according to the Taiwan Environmental Information Center. Alangyi is now a major issue reflecting steadily growing environmental concern amongst the Taiwanese, but its fate is sadly uncertain. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8689 2011-11-14T22:52:00Z 2011-11-17T04:15:59Z Cultural erosion among indigenous groups in Venezuela brings new risks for Caura rainforest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/11/1107_I_16_Kike-Arnal150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>One of the planet's most beautiful landscapes is in danger. Deep in southern Venezuela, among ancient forested tabletop mountains known as tepuis, crystalline rivers, and breathtaking waterfalls, outside influences &#8212; malaria, the high price of gold, commercial hunting, and cultural erosion &#8212; are threatening one of world's largest remaining blocks of wilderness, one that is home to indigenous people and strikingly high levels of biological diversity. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8351 2011-08-31T20:05:00Z 2011-08-31T20:06:41Z World's oldest person discovered in Amazon rainforest Maria Lucimar Pereira is arguably the world's oldest living person: a member of the Kaxinawá tribe, Pereira lives in the Brazilian Amazon and will be soon celebrating her 121st birthday, according to Survival International. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8263 2011-08-09T16:18:00Z 2011-08-09T20:53:45Z Picture of the day: faces of the indigenous, celebrating the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples Today, August 9th, is the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples. To help celebrate the world's indigenous cultures, mongabay.com has put together this collection of photos. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8232 2011-08-01T15:57:00Z 2011-08-03T14:31:26Z How fruit defines Borneo <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/Rambutan.150.jpg " align="left"/></td></tr></table>Among conservationists and biologists, the mega-island of Borneo is a sort of Mecca. Its rich plant and animal biodiversity, as well as high degree of endemism (unique species found nowhere else) make it a naturalist's dream. There is one aspect of this biological richness which applies to the wellbeing and happiness of all of Borneo’s residents, human and animal, in a very direct way: fruit. From wild forest berries to juicy cultivated rambutans, fruit permeates the ecology, landscape and culture of Borneo. On the island there are over 70 wild fruit trees species and around 45 cultivated species that are consumed by people (1). Science has certainly not yet documented all the fruit consumed by wildlife, but we know that the total must be over 500 species. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7850 2011-05-10T22:11:00Z 2011-05-11T02:00:05Z Distressed Place and Faded Grace in North Sulawesi <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay/indonesia/150/sulawesi-tangkoko_0329.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The Nantu Wildlife Reserve is located in northern Sulawesi’s Minehasa Peninsula, in Gorontalo Province. Sulawesi is among the largest of Indonesia’s some seventeen thousand islands. Its shape is bizarre: a sinuous sprawling monkey, with lavish tail, poised to leap the straits of Makassar. Sulawesi lies to the north of Bali and Lombok and to the east of Borneo. Alfred Russell Wallace, the nineteenth century English explorer and natural scientist of broad expertise, spent a lot of time in Sulawesi’s northern peninsula, casting his curiosity and observation with such singular acuity that his mind apprehended “Darwin’s theory of evolution” independently from and possibly before Darwin. His work described the zone of transition between the Asian and Australian zoographic regions and was so accurate and thorough in its logic that today, some one-hundred and fifty years later, the zone is named Wallacea. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7065 2010-11-15T22:02:00Z 2010-11-15T22:54:50Z Chaco biodiversity expedition suspended A joint expedition by the Natural History Museum (NHM), London and the Natural History Museum, Asuncion to the dwindling dry forest of the Gran Chaco in Paraguay to record biodiversity, and hopefully uncover 'hundreds' of new species, has been suspended by the Paraguayan government. The suspension comes after a local organization voiced concern that the expedition would threaten uncontacted member of the Ayoreo tribe in the forest. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7044 2010-11-11T21:29:00Z 2010-11-11T21:46:36Z Chaco expedition working to "minimize the risk" of running into uncontacted natives A joint expedition by the Natural History Museum (NHM), London and the Natural History Museum, Asuncion to study the biodiversity of the dwindling dry forests of Chaco in Paraguay have responded to recent concerns that they risk encountering uncontacted natives, which could potentially threaten the natives' lives as well as their own. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6998 2010-11-04T04:55:00Z 2010-11-04T05:04:54Z Better protection of cultural heritage sites could generate $100B in poor countries Cultural heritage sites could play a key role in efforts to alleviate poverty provided they are protected from a growing range of threats, says a new report published by the Global Heritage Fund (GHF). Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6913 2010-10-17T16:46:00Z 2010-10-17T17:47:24Z The ultimate bike trip: the Amazon rainforest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/gunzelmann.action.150.jpg " align="left"/></td></tr></table>Like all commercial roads through rainforests, the 5,300 kilometer long Rodovia Transamazonica (in English, the Trans-Amazonia), brought two things: people and environmental destruction. Opening once-remote areas of the Amazon to both legal and illegal development, farmers, loggers, and miners cut swathes into the forest now easily visible from satellite. But the road has also brought little prosperity: many who live there are far from infrastructure and eek out an impoverished existence in a harsh lonely wilderness. This is not a place even the most adventurous travelers go, yet Doug Gunzelmann not only traveled the entirety of the Transamazonica in 2009, he <i>cycled</i> it. A self-described adventurer, Gunzelmann chose to bike the Transamazonica as a way to test his endurance on a road which only a few before have completed. But Gunzelmann wasn't just out for adrenaline-rushes, he was also deeply interested in the environmental issues related to the Transamazonica. What he found was a story without villains, but only humans—and the Amazon itself—trying to survive in a complex, confusing world. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6640 2010-08-18T22:17:00Z 2010-08-19T00:15:30Z Exploring Kenya's sky island <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/false_vampire_bat_matthews.thumb.jpg " align="left"/></td></tr></table>Rising over 2,500 meters from Kenya's northern desert, the Mathews Range is a sky island: isolated mountain forests surrounded by valleys. Long cut off from other forests, 'sky islands' such as this often contain unique species and ecosystems. Supported by the Nature Conservancy, an expedition including local community programs Northern Rangelands Trust and Namunyak Conservancy recently spent a week surveying the mountain range, expanding the range of a number of species and discovering what is likely a new insect. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6550 2010-07-27T19:55:00Z 2010-07-29T17:46:27Z Oil devastates indigenous tribes from the Amazon to the Gulf <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/gulf_tmo_2010119_2.thumb.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table> For the past few months, the mainstream media has focused on the environmental and technical dimensions of the Gulf mess. While that’s certainly important, reporters have ignored a crucial aspect of the BP spill: cultural extermination and the plight of indigenous peoples. Recently, the issue was highlighted when Louisiana Gulf residents in the town of Dulac received some unfamiliar visitors: Cofán Indians and others from the Amazon jungle. What could have prompted these indigenous peoples to travel so far from their native South America? Victims of the criminal oil industry, the Cofán are cultural survivors. Intent on helping others avoid their own unfortunate fate, the Indians shared their experiences and insights with members of the United Houma Nation who have been wondering how they will ever preserve their way of life in the face of BP’s oil spill. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6516 2010-07-20T15:03:00Z 2010-07-27T20:47:40Z Mahogany market in US threatening the lives of uncontacted natives in the Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/PERU-MUR-CF-03.thumb.jpg " align="left"/></td></tr></table>Consumers in the US purchasing mahogany furniture may be unwittingly supporting illegal logging in a Peruvian reserve for uncontacted indigenous tribes, imperiling the indigenous peoples' lives. A new report by the Upper Amazon Conservancy (UAC) provides evidence that loggers are illegally felling mahogany trees in the Murunahua Reserve where it is estimated some 200 uncontacted natives live. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6477 2010-07-11T19:38:00Z 2010-07-11T20:28:58Z Conservation photography: on shooting and saving the world's largest temperate rainforest, an interview with Amy Gulick <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/GulickBio_8068_020.thumb.jpg " align="left"/></td></tr></table>Most of the US's large ecosystems are but shadows of their former selves. The old-growth deciduous forests that once covered nearly all of the east and mid-west continental US are gone, reduced to a few fragmented patches that are still being lost. The tall grassy plains that once stretched further than any eye could see have been almost wholly replaced by agriculture and increasing suburbs. Habitats, from deserts to western forests, are largely carved by roads and under heavy impact from resource exploitation to invasive species. Coastal marine systems, once super abundant, have partially collapsed in many places due to overfishing, as well as pollution and development. Despite this, there are still places in the US where the 'wild' in wilderness remains largely true, and one of those is the Tongass temperate rainforest of Southeast Alaska. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5877 2010-03-26T18:01:00Z 2010-03-26T18:29:05Z Spanish oil company develops own rules for contacting uncontacted Amazon tribes <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/10/0326survival150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Imagine you're in one of the remotest parts of the Amazon rainforest and suddenly you come across members of an uncontacted tribe. What should you do? The experts say, "Turn around. At all costs, make no attempt at contact." Repsol YPF, exploring for oil in northern Peru, has taken a different approach. Despite the extreme vulnerability of the tribes to any form of contact, the company suggests that its workers talk to them in certain instances, and even provides specific phrases to use and conversation topics to address. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5612 2010-02-04T14:54:00Z 2010-02-09T20:50:21Z Extinct: last of the Andaman tribe dies Boa Sr, the last speaker of ‘Bo’, one of the ten Great Andamanese languages, died last week, according to Survival International. She was 85. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5352 2009-12-23T20:29:00Z 2009-12-23T22:16:07Z Brazil establishes 20,000 sq mi of new indigenous reserves in the Amazon <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/1223brazil_reserves150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>On Monday, Brazil decreed nine new indigenous reserves covering 51,000 square kilometers (19,700 square miles) of the Amazon rainforest, an areas larger than Denmark or Switzerland, reports the <i>AFP</i>. Five of the reserves are located in the state of Amazonas, two are in Pará, one is in Roraima, and another is in Mato Grosso do Sul. The protected areas house about seven thousand Indians from 29 ethnic groups, according to FUNAI (Fundação Nacional do Índio), Brazil's indigenous affairs agency. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5268 2009-12-10T17:34:00Z 2009-12-11T02:22:09Z Rainforest tribe sues the Malaysian government for enabling deforestation Five Penan rainforest communities are suing the Sarawak state government and the Malaysian timber giant Samling for violation of their native customary rights, reports the Bruno Manser Fund, a group that works on behalf of indigenous groups in Malaysia. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/5160 2009-11-24T03:13:00Z 2009-11-24T03:54:11Z Efforts to slow climate change may put indigenous people at risk Efforts to slow climate change are putting indigenous people at risk, warns a new report published by Survival International, an indigenous rights' group. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4921 2009-09-01T19:05:00Z 2009-09-01T21:39:16Z Penan tribe to continue blockade against loggers with blowpipes and spears A meeting between the Penan indigenous tribe, Malaysian government officials, and representatives of a logging company ended without an agreement on Friday. After the meeting, a Penan spokesman declared that the group's blockade would continue. Blockaders, dressed in traditional garb, have armed themselves with blowguns and spears. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4630 2009-06-11T20:31:00Z 2009-06-11T20:51:04Z Peru suspends decree that triggered bloody conflict between Indians and police Peruvian lawmakers yesterday suspended a controversial decree that contributed to a bloody conflict between police and indigenous protesters in the country's Amazon region, reports the AFP. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4396 2009-03-20T20:07:00Z 2009-03-20T20:30:15Z Land rights victory for Amazon Indians in Brazil In what is being hailed as a victory for indigenous groups in the Brazilian Amazon, Brazil's Supreme Court sided with Indians from the Raposa Serra do Sol reservation in a 30-year land dispute with large-scale farmers in the northern state of Roraima, near the border with Venezuela, reports the Associated Press. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4279 2009-02-10T13:12:00Z 2009-02-10T13:16:15Z Amazon indian tribe accused of killing and eating farmer Five members of the Kulina tribe in the Brazilian Amazon are on the run after allegedly killing and eating a farmer in a "ritual act of cannibalism", reports CNN. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4221 2009-01-28T05:26:00Z 2009-01-28T06:14:05Z Photo: Indigenous leaders form giant human banner to protest Amazon destruction <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/0127ran150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Gathering at the World Social Forum in Belem, Brazil, indigenous people from across Latin America today called upon world leaders to protect the Amazon rainforest which is under continued threat from loggers, ranchers, and agroindustrial companies. Nearly 12,000 square kilometers (4,600 sq miles) of Amazon rainforest were destroyed last year while another 25,000 square kilometers were damaged or degraded. More than 1000 forum participants formed a human banner that spelled out the message "SALVE A AMAZONIA" ("Save the Amazon" in Portuguese) around a silhouette of an indigenous warrior taking aim with a bow and arrow. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/3185 2008-08-28T14:30:00Z 2013-08-23T23:00:22Z Pre-Colombian Amazonians lived in sustainable 'urban' society Researchers have uncovered new evidence to support the controversial theory that parts of the Amazon were home to dense "urban" settlements prior to the arrival of Europeans in the 15th century. The study is published this Friday in the journal <i>Science</i>. Conducting archeological excavations and aerial imagery across a number of sites in the Upper Xingu region of the Brazilian Amazon, a team of researchers led by Michael Heckenberger found evidence of a grid-like pattern of 150-acre towns and smaller villages, connected by complex road networks and arranged around large plazas where public rituals would take place. The authors argue that the discoveries indicate parts of the Amazon supported "urban" societies based around agriculture, forest management, and fish farming. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/3105 2008-07-28T14:30:39Z 2008-12-16T10:14:33Z An interview a shaman in the Amazon rainforest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/08/0728amasina.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Deep in the Suriname rainforest, an innovative conservation group is working with indigenous tribes to protect their forest home and culture using traditional knowledge combined with cutting-edge technology. The Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) is partnering with the Trio, an Amerindian group that lives in the remote Suriname-Brazil border area of South America, to develop programs to protect their forest home from illegal gold miners and encroachment, improve village health, and strengthen cultural ties between indigenous youths and elders at a time when such cultures are disappearing even faster than rainforests. In June 2008 mongabay.com visited the community of Kwamalasamutu in Suriname to see ACT's programs in action. During the visit, Amasina, a Trio shaman who works with ACT, answered some questions about his role as a traditional healer in the village. Rhett Butler