tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/cryptic%20species1 cryptic species news from mongabay.com 2014-10-10T20:57:09Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13897 2014-10-09T22:59:00Z 2014-10-10T20:57:09Z Google, zoo to leverage 'TV white space' to monitor wildlife Imagine watching a tiger stalk a sambar deer or catching a ghost-like glimpse of the rarely-seen saola&#8212;all from your desktop and in real time. Well, this may soon be possible under a new partnership with Google and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), which will test TV white space to monitor zoo animals as a trial run for real-time filming life in the wild. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13590 2014-07-28T13:17:00Z 2014-07-29T19:39:18Z Short-eared dog? Uncovering the secrets of one of the Amazon's most mysterious mammals <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0727.2010.-Los-Amigos.-Oso-at-age-4-.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Fifteen years ago, scientists knew next to nothing about one of the Amazon's most mysterious residents: the short-eared dog. Although the species was first described in 1883 and is considered the sole representative of the Atelocynus genus, biologists spent over a century largely in the dark about an animal that seemed almost a myth. Jeremy Hance -11.888234 -71.407557 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13481 2014-07-01T23:02:00Z 2014-07-01T23:22:17Z Bigfoot found? Nope, 'sasquatch hairs' come from cows, raccoons, and humans <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/SUM_3464150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Subjecting 30 hairs purportedly from bigfoot, the yeti, and other mystery apes has revealed a menagerie of sources, but none of them giant primates (unless you count humans). Using DNA testing, the scientists undertook the most rigorous and wide-ranging examination yet of evidence of these cryptic&#8212;perhaps mythical&#8212;apes, according to a new study in the Proceedings of Royal Society B. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13476 2014-07-01T16:13:00Z 2014-07-24T17:04:46Z On babies and motherhood: how giant armadillos are surprising scientists (photos) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0701.giantarmadillo.thumb.1-(24).150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Until ten years ago scientist's knowledge of the reproductive habits of the giant armadillo&#8212; the world's biggest&#8212; were basically regulated to speculation. But a long-term research project in the Brazilian Pantanal is changing that: last year researchers announced the first ever photos of a baby giant armadillo and have since recorded a second birth from another female. Jeremy Hance -15.849044 -56.212636 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13399 2014-06-17T18:18:00Z 2014-06-17T21:09:28Z Camera trap captures first ever video of rarely-seen bird in the Amazon...and much more <table align="left"><tr><td><img src=" http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/1107.Mosquera--Nocturnal-curassow.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A camera trap program in Ecuador's embattled Yasuni National Program has struck gold, taking what researchers believe is the first ever film of a wild nocturnal curassow (Nothocrax urumutum). In addition, the program has captured video of other rarely-seen animals, including the short-eared dog and the giant armadillo. Jeremy Hance -0.637516 -76.148906 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12979 2014-03-25T15:00:00Z 2014-03-26T13:40:55Z Long lost mammal photographed on camera trap in Vietnam <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0325.rooseveltsmuntjac.SUNP0044.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In 1929, two sons of Theodore Roosevelt (Teddy Junior and Kermit) led an expedition that killed a barking deer, or muntjac, in present-day Laos, which has left scientists puzzled for over 80 years. At first scientists believed it to be a distinct species of muntjac and named it Roosevelts' muntjac (Muntiacus rooseveltorum), however that designation was soon cast into doubt with some scientists claiming it was a specimen of an already-known muntjac or a subspecies. The problem was compounded by the fact that the animal simply disappeared in the wild. No one ever documented a living Roosevelts' muntjac again&#8212;until now. Jeremy Hance 20.004510 105.065916 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12948 2014-03-18T16:52:00Z 2014-03-18T19:04:08Z Several Amazonian tree frog species discovered, where only two existed before <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0318.amazonfrogs.Image-3.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>We have always been intrigued by the Amazon rainforest with its abundant species richness and untraversed expanses. Despite our extended study of its wildlife, new species such as the olinguito (<i>Bassaricyon neblina</i>), a bear-like carnivore hiding out in the Ecuadorian rainforest, are being identified as recently as last year. In fact, the advent of efficient DNA sequencing and genomic analysis has revolutionized how we think about species diversity. Today, scientists can examine known diversity in a different way, revealing multiple 'cryptic' species that have evaded discovery by being mistakenly classified as a single species based on external appearance alone. Jeremy Hance -12.356977 -71.375915 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12774 2014-02-14T03:12:00Z 2014-02-14T03:13:10Z Scientists discover new whale species <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0213.800px-Beaked_Whale.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Beaked whales are incredibly elusive and rare, little-known to scientists and the public alike&#8212;although some species are three times the size of an elephant. Extreme divers, beaked whales have been recorded plunging as deep as 1,800 meters (5,900 feet) for over an hour. Few of the over 20 species are well-known by researchers, but now scientists have discovered a new beaked whale to add to the already large, and cryptic, group: the pointed beaked whale (Mesoplodon hotaula). Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12528 2013-12-16T22:30:00Z 2014-12-16T14:14:26Z Scientists make one of the biggest animal discoveries of the century: a new tapir <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1216.newtapir.SUNP0052.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In what will likely be considered one of the biggest (literally) zoological discoveries of the Twenty-First Century, scientists today announced they have discovered a new species of tapir in Brazil and Colombia. The new mammal, hidden from science but known to local indigenous tribes, is actually one of the biggest animals on the continent, although it's still the smallest living tapir. Described in the Journal of Mammology, the scientists have named the new tapir Tapirus kabomani after the name for 'tapir' in the local Paumari language: Arabo kabomani. Jeremy Hance -4.609278 -69.810333 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12461 2013-11-27T16:58:00Z 2013-11-27T17:24:45Z Scientists discover new cat species roaming Brazil <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1126.L-guttulus-08-TGO_med_res2.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>As a family, cats are some of the most well-studied animals on Earth, but that doesn't mean these adept carnivores don't continue to surprise us. Scientists have announced today the stunning discovery of a new species of cat, long-confused with another. Looking at the molecular data of small cats in Brazil, researchers found that the tigrina&#8212;also known as the oncilla in Central America&#8212;is actually two separate species. The new species has been dubbed Leopardus guttulus and is found in the Atlantic Forest of southern Brazil, while the other Leopardus tigrinus is found in the cerrado and Caatinga ecosystems in northeastern Brazil. Jeremy Hance -25.697226 -48.620796 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12305 2013-11-04T22:23:00Z 2013-11-05T15:28:35Z World's most cryptic feline photographed in logging concession <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/1104baycat150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The bay cat is arguably the world's least-known member of the cat family (Felidae). Although first described by scientists in 1874, no photo existed of a living specimen until 1998 and a wild cat in its rainforest habitat wasn't photographed until five years later. Given this, scientists with Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Imperial College London were taken aback when their remote camera traps captured numerous photos of these elusive cats hanging out in a commercial logging concession in Sabah, a state in Malaysian Borneo. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12249 2013-10-24T15:25:00Z 2013-10-28T13:53:50Z Armored giant turns out to be vital ecosystem engineer <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1024.Schafer.Tatu.099.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus) is not called a giant for nothing: it weighs as much as a large dog and grows longer than the world's biggest tortoise. However, despite its gigantism, many people in its range&#8212;from the Amazon to the Pantanal&#8212;don't even know it exists or believe it to be more mythology than reality. This is a rare megafauna that has long eluded not only scientific study, but even basic human attention. However, undertaking the world's first long-term study of giant armadillos has allowed intrepid biologist, Arnaud Desbiez, to uncovered a wealth of new information about these cryptic creatures. Not only has Desbiez documented giant armadillo reproduction for the first time, but has also discovered that these gentle giants create vital habitats for a variety of other species. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12216 2013-10-20T18:59:00Z 2013-10-21T17:55:21Z Yeti may be undescribed bear species <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1020.800px-Polar_Bear_-_Alaska.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The purported Yeti, an ape-like creature that walks upright and roams the remote Himalayas, may in fact be an ancient polar bear species, according to new DNA research by Bryan Sykes with Oxford University. Sykes subjected two hairs from what locals say belonged to the elusive Yeti only to discover that the genetics matched a polar bear jawbone found in Svalbard, Norway dating from around 120,000 (though as recent as 40,000 years ago). Jeremy Hance 27.965295 90.323181 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11477 2013-05-23T18:24:00Z 2013-05-23T18:36:33Z Scientists discover two mini-spiders in China (photos) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0523.twominispiders.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Scientists have uncovered two miniature spiders living on mountains in China's southern region, one of which is among the smallest spiders recorded worldwide, according to a new paper in ZooKeys. Both spiders belong to the Mysmenidae family, which is made up of mini-spiders with eight eyes. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11456 2013-05-20T16:36:00Z 2014-02-22T23:20:28Z Could the Tasmanian tiger be hiding out in New Guinea? <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0520.ThylacineOslo.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Many people still believe the Tasmanian tiger (<i>Thylacinus cynocephalus</i>) survives in the wilds of Tasmania, even though the species was declared extinct over eighty years ago. Sightings and reports of the elusive carnivorous marsupial, which was the top predator on the island, pop-up almost as frequently as those of Bigfoot in North America, but to date no definitive evidence has emerged of its survival. Yet, a noted cryptozoologist (one who searches for hidden animals), Dr. Karl Shuker, wrote recently that tiger hunters should perhaps turn their attention to a different island: New Guinea. Jeremy Hance -4.140983 137.213287 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11180 2013-04-08T16:53:00Z 2013-04-10T13:43:47Z Looking beyond the hundred legs: finding new centipedes in India requires many tools <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0408.centipedeparts.india.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A small, boneless creature, that lives underground, with a "hundred" legs, and a rather powerful sting; some of these creatures are drab, but some are so beautiful and brightly colored that they can startle. Centipedes. There is more to a centipede than its many legs, and its habit of darting out of dark places. One of the first lifeforms to turn up on land, some centipede fossils date back to about 450 million years ago. They have been evolving steadily since, with some estimates showing about 8,000 species today. Not even half of these species have been taxonomically described. Jeremy Hance 9.860628 76.505127 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10895 2013-02-19T19:04:00Z 2013-10-24T16:41:42Z Scientists document baby giant armadillo for first time (photos) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0219.Standing--Giant-Armadillo-Credit-Kevin-Schafer-Pantanal-Giant-Armadillo-Project.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Despite weighing as much as full-grown human, almost nothing is known about the giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus) including its breeding and reproductive behaviors. How does mating occur? How long does pregnancy last? How many babes are typically born? Scientists are simply in the dark, but a ground-breaking study employing camera traps is beginning to change this. For the first time, scientists in the Brazilian Pantanal have documented giant armadillo breeding and the happy outcome: a baby giant armadillo. Jeremy Hance -19.300775 -55.700684 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10894 2013-02-19T14:55:00Z 2013-03-25T20:21:48Z Jaguars, tapirs, oh my!: Amazon explorer films shocking wildlife bonanza in threatened forest <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0219.jaguar.Screen-Shot-2013-02-07-at-8.56.21-AM.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Watching a new video by Amazon explorer, Paul Rosolie, one feels transported into a hidden world of stalking jaguars, heavyweight tapirs, and daylight-wandering giant armadillos. This is the Amazon as one imagines it as a child: still full of wild things. In just four weeks at a single colpa (or clay lick where mammals and birds gather) on the lower Las Piedras River, Rosolie and his team captured 30 Amazonian species on video, including seven imperiled species. However, the very spot Rosolie and his team filmed is under threat: the lower Las Piedras River is being infiltrated by loggers, miners, and farmers following the construction of the Trans-Amazon highway. Jeremy Hance -12.055437 -69.818916 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10875 2013-02-13T20:56:00Z 2013-02-13T21:04:20Z Genetics study claims to prove existence of Bigfoot <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0213.450px-BigfootStatue-SilverLakeWA.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A new study purporting to uncover DNA evidence for Bigfoot has been published today in <i>DeNovo Scientific Journal</i>. While Bigfoot-enthusiasts have long argued that the cryptic monster is an unidentified ape species, the new study says their genetic evidence shows the Sasquatch is in fact a hybrid of modern human females mating with an unidentified primate species 13,000 years ago. The only problem: the journal in which the study is published&#8212;DeNovo Scientific Journal&#8212;appears to have been created recently with the sole purpose to publish this study. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10717 2013-01-16T22:10:00Z 2013-01-22T16:31:21Z Bloodsucking flies help scientists identify rare, hard-to-find mammals <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0116.Calliphora_vomitoria_Portrait.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Last year scientists released a study that is likely to revolutionize how conservationists track elusive species. Researchers extracted the recently sucked blood of terrestrial leeches in Vietnam's remote Annamite Mountains and looked at the DNA of what they'd been feeding on: remarkably researchers were able to identify a number of endangered and rarely-seen mammals. In fact two of the species gleaned from these blood-meals had been discovered by scientists as late as the 1990s. In the past, trying to find rare and shy jungle animals required many man hours and a lot of funding. While the increasing use of remote camera traps has allowed scientists to expand their search, DNA sampling from leeches could be the next big step in simplifying (and cheapening) the quest for tracking the world's mammals. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10495 2012-12-03T15:29:00Z 2014-02-22T23:20:47Z New Guinea singing dog photographed in the wild for the first time A rarely seen canine has been photographed in the wild, likely for the first time. Tom Hewitt, director of Adventure Alternative Borneo, photographed the New Guinea singing dog during a 12-day expedition up a remote mountain in Indonesian Papua. Very closely related to the Australian dingo, the New Guinea singing dog, so named for its unique vocalizations, has become hugely threatened by hybridization with domesticated dogs. Jeremy Hance -4.709881 140.290546 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10365 2012-11-05T17:07:00Z 2012-11-05T17:28:23Z Whale only known from bones washes up on beach in New Zealand <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/800px-Beaked_Whale.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In 2010, a whale mother and male calf were found dead on Opape Beach in New Zealand. Although clearly in the beaked whale family&#8212;the most mysterious marine mammal family&#8212;scientists thought the pair were relatively well-known Gray's beaked whales (Mesoplodon grayi). That is until DNA findings told a shocking story: the mother and calf were actually spade-toothed beaked whales (Mesoplodon traversii), a species no one had ever seen before as anything more than a pile of bones. Jeremy Hance -37.979166 177.411579 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10316 2012-10-25T16:50:00Z 2012-10-25T17:40:33Z After seven year search, scientists film cryptic predator in Minas Gerais South America's rare and little-known bush dog (Speothos venaticus) looks like a miniature dachshund who went bad: leaner, meaner, and not one to cuddle on your lap, the bush dog is found in 11 South American countries, but scientists believe it's rare in all of its habitats, which include the Amazon, the Pantanal wetlands, and the cerrado savannah. Given its scarcity, little is known about its wanderings. Jeremy Hance -18.542117 -44.366456 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9767 2012-07-02T18:51:00Z 2012-07-02T19:38:17Z Scientific expedition to survey species in China's Bigfoot territory This month, nearly 40 scientists will enter a wild and remote region of western China, reports China's state media Xinhua. Spending several weeks in Shennongjia Nature Reserve, the researchers hope to study rare species like the golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana), which is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List. But the forest is also the source of China's 'wild man' sightings; known locally as the 'Yeren,' the unconfirmed primate has also been dubbed China's Bigfoot. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9734 2012-06-27T16:36:00Z 2012-06-27T16:48:08Z Genetic analysis reveals 79 new species of sharks and rays, many likely endangered Analyzing the DNA sequences of 4,383 specimens of sharks and rays, researchers have discovered 79 potentially new species, raising both the known diversity of this predacious family and concerns that many species are likely more imperiled than thought. Already 32 percent of open ocean sharks and rays are considered threatened with extinction by the IUCN Red List, due largely to overfishing, finning, bycatch, and prey depletion. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9456 2012-04-30T12:47:00Z 2013-02-24T01:50:20Z Does the Tasmanian tiger exist? Is the saola extinct? Ask the leeches <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://travel.mongabay.com/malaysia/150/borneo_3683.JPG" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The use of remote camera traps, which photograph animals as they pass, has revolutionized research on endangered and cryptic species. The tool has even allowed scientists to document animals new to science or feared extinct. But as important as camera traps have become, they are still prohibitively expensive for many conservationists and require many grueling hours in remote forests. A new paper in Current Biology, however, announces an incredibly innovative and cheaper way of recording rare mammals: seek out the leeches that feed on them. The research found that the presence of mammals, at least, can be determined by testing the victim's blood for DNA stored in the leech. Jeremy Hance 18.703489 103.889465 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9309 2012-03-26T17:42:00Z 2012-12-02T22:27:02Z Beyond Bigfoot: the science of cryptozoology <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/Delcourt's-giant-gecko,-Markus-Buhler.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Anyone who doubts cryptozoology, which in Greek means the "study of hidden animals," should remember the many lessons of the past 110 years: the mountain gorilla (discovered in 1902), the colossal squid (discovered in 1925, but a full specimen not caught until 1981), and the saola (discovered in 1992) to name a few. Every year, almost 20,000 new species are described by the world's scientists, and a new book by Dr. Karl Shuker, The Encycloapedia of New and Rediscovered Animals, highlights some of the most incredible and notable new animals uncovered during the past century. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9247 2012-03-13T13:55:00Z 2012-03-13T14:10:54Z Javan officials employ camera traps to find extinct tiger Although officially declared extinct in 2003, some people believe the Javan tiger (panthera tigris sondaica) is still alive in the island's Meru Betiri National Park. To prove the big cat has not vanished for good, wildlife officials have installed five camera traps in the park, reports Antara News. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9102 2012-02-14T14:21:00Z 2012-02-15T19:38:48Z The camera trap revolution: how a simple device is shaping research and conservation worldwide <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/Malay-Civet-(Viverra-tangalunga).150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>I must confess to a recent addiction: camera trap photos. When the Smithsonian released 202,000 camera trap photos to the public online, I couldn’t help but spend hours transfixed by the private world of animals. There was the golden snub-monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana), with its unmistakably blue face staring straight at you, captured on a trail in the mountains of China. Or a southern tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla), a tree anteater that resembles a living Muppet, poking its nose in the leaf litter as sunlight plays on its head in the Peruvian Amazon. Or the dim body of a spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) led by jewel-like eyes in the Tanzanian night. Or the less exotic red fox (Vulpes vulpes) which admittedly appears much more exotic when shot in China in the midst of a snowstorm. Even the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), an animal I too often connect with cartoons and stuffed animals, looks wholly real and wild when captured by camera trap: no longer a symbol or even a pudgy bear at the zoo, but a true animal with its own inner, mysterious life. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9035 2012-01-31T18:36:00Z 2012-12-02T22:20:31Z Forgotten species: the wild jungle cattle called banteng <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/banteng.SWD_1.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The word "cattle," for most of us, is the antithesis of exotic; it's familiar like a family member one's happy enough to ignore, but doesn't really mind having around. Think for a moment of the names: cattle, cow, bovine...likely they make many of us think more of the animals' byproducts than the creatures themselves&#8212;i.e. milk, butter, ice cream or steak&#8212;as if they were an automated food factory and not living beings. But if we expand our minds a bit further, "cattle" may bring up thoughts of cowboys, Texas, herds pounding the dust, or merely grazing dully in the pasture. But none of these titles, no matter how far we pursue them, conjure up images of steamy tropical rainforest or gravely imperiled species. A cow may be beautiful in its own domesticated sort-of-way, but there is nothing wild in it, nothing enchanting. However like most generalizations, this idea of cattle falls to pieces when one encounters, whether in literature or life, the banteng. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8548 2011-10-13T20:18:00Z 2011-10-14T14:53:03Z If camera traps don't prove existence of Bigfoot or Yeti nothing will <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/Yasuni_361.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Let me state for the record that I am skeptical of the existence of Bigfoot or the Yeti, however I do have a fascination for following the latest news on the seemingly never-ending search for these hidden hominids. This week a Yeti conference in Russia announced 'indisputable proof' of the legendary hairy ape in the wilds of Southern Siberia. What did this proof consist of? Not DNA, photographs, video, or the Yeti itself (dead or alive) as one would expect from the word 'indisputable', but a few alleged Yeti hairs, an alleged bed, and alleged footprints. Cryptozoologists, those who are fascinated by hidden species such as the proposed Yeti and Bigfoot, don't serve their cause by stating the reality of a species without the evidence long-deemed necessary by scientific community to prove it&#8212;either a body or DNA samples combined with clear photographic evidence&#8212;instead they make themselves easy targets of scorn and ridicule. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7688 2011-04-04T19:19:00Z 2012-12-02T22:34:28Z The saola: rushing to save the most 'spectacular zoological discovery' of the 20th Century <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/martha.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The saola (<i>Pseudoryx nghetinhensis</i>) may be the most enigmatic, beautiful, and endangered big mammal in the world—that no one has ever heard of. The shy ungulate looks like an African antelope—perhaps inhabiting the wide deserts of the Sahara—but instead it lives in the dense jungles of Vietnam and Laos, and is more related to wild cattle than Africa's antelopes. The saola is so unusual that is has been given its own genus: Pseudoryx, due to its superficial similarities to Africa's oryx. In the company of humans this quiet forest dweller acts calm and tame, but has yet to survive captivity long. Yet strangest of all, the 200 pound (90 kilogram) animal remained wholly unknown to science until 1992. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7098 2010-11-23T19:48:00Z 2010-11-23T19:51:04Z Genetic analysis uncovers new parrot on the edge of extinction <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/west_ground_parrot.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Down to just over 100 individuals, DNA analysis has revealed one of the world's most imperiled bird species: the western ground parrot <i>Pezoporus flaviventris.</i>. Genetic evidence collected from museums specimens, some well-over a century old, have led scientists to "cautiously suggest" that Australia's ground parrot be split into two distinct species—the eastern and the western—and not subspecies as they are currently considered. According to the study, the ground parrot species split apart some two million years ago, around the same time as the first members of the genus Homo evolved. Jeremy Hance