tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/Uzbekistan1 Uzbekistan news from mongabay.com 2014-12-30T22:55:41Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12645 2014-01-16T20:26:00Z 2014-12-30T22:55:41Z Snow leopards and other mammals caught on camera trap in Uzbekistan (photos) <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/14/0116.CAM43590-2013-11-16_14-31-13.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Scientists knew that snow leopards (Panthera uncia) still survived in the Central Asian country of Uzbekistan, but late last year they captured the first ever photos. Camera traps in the Gissar Nature Reserve took photos of the big cats, along with bear, lynx, ibex, wild boar, and other mammals. The camera trap program was led by biologists Bakhtiyor Aromov and Yelizaveta Protas working with Panthera, WWF's Central Asia Program, and Uzbekistan's Biocontrol Agency. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7813 2011-05-01T17:50:00Z 2011-05-01T18:14:50Z New eco-tour to help save bizarre antelope in 'forgotten' region <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/Saiga-calf-copyright-Nils-Bunnefeld.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Imagine visiting a region that is largely void of tourists, yet has world-class bird watching, a unique Buddhist population, and one of the world's most bizarre-looking and imperilled mammals: the saiga. A new tour to Southern Russia hopes to aid a Critically Endangered species while giving tourists an inside look at a region "largely forgotten by the rest of the world," says Anthony Dancer. Few species have fallen so far and so fast in the past 15 years as Central Asia's antelope, the saiga. Its precipitous decline is reminiscent of the bison or the passenger pigeon in 19th Century America, but conservationists hopes it avoids the fate of the latter. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/6593 2010-08-09T18:52:00Z 2015-01-23T17:49:15Z Photos: world's top ten 'lost frogs' <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/golden_toad.thumb.jpg " align="left"/></td></tr></table>The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and Conservation International (CI) have sent teams of researchers to 14 countries on five continents to search for the world's lost frogs. These are amphibian species that have not been seen for years—in some cases even up to a century—but may still survive in the wild. Amphibians worldwide are currently undergoing an extinction crisis. While amphibians struggle to survive against habitat loss, climate change, pollution, and overexploitation, they are also being wiped out by a fungal disease known as chytridiomycosis. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4991 2009-09-20T20:08:00Z 2012-09-12T21:18:20Z After declining 95% in 15 years, Saiga antelope begins to rebound with help from conservationists <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g94/troufs/SeverewinterinUstyurtPhotobyAlexand.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>In a decline on par with that suffered by the American bison in the Nineteenth Century, in the 1990s the saiga antelope of the Central Asian steppe plummeted from over one million individuals to 50,000, dropping a staggering 95 percent in a decade and a half. Since then new legislation and conservation measure have helped the species stabilize in some areas but in others the decline continues. Working for six years with the Saiga Conservation Alliance, Founding Member and Executive Secretary Elena Bykova has helped bring the species back from the very brink of extinction. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4946 2009-09-07T19:32:00Z 2009-09-07T20:25:27Z Apple's Snow Leopard helps real-life cats Apple's release of its new operating system, dubbed "Snow Leopard", is helping raise awareness of the plight of one of the world's most endangered big cats, reports the Snow Leopard Trust, a group working to protect the real-life snow leopard in its mountainous habitat across Central Asia. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/3378 2008-10-28T14:30:00Z 2012-09-12T21:18:34Z How to Save Snow Leopards <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/08/1027rj150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The snow leopard (Panthera uncia) is one of the rarest and most elusive big cat species with a population of 4,500 to 7,500 spread across a range of 1.2 to 1.6 million kilometers in some of the world&#x27;s harshest and most desolate landscapes. Found in arid environments and at elevations sometimes reaching 18,000 feet (5,500 meters), the species faces great threats despite its extreme habitat. These threats vary across its range, but in all countries where it is found &#8212; Afghanistan, Bhutan, China, India, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Mongolia, Pakistan, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and possibly Myanmar &#8212; the species is at risk. In some countries snow leopard are directly hunted for their pelt, in others they are imperiled by depletion of prey, loss of habitat, and killing as a predator of livestock. These threats, combined with the cat&#x27;s large habitat requirements, means conservation through the establishment of protected areas alone may not be enough save it from extinction in the wild in many of the countries in which it lives. Working to stave off this fate in half a dozen of its range countries is the Snow Leopard Conservancy. Founded by Dr. Rodney Jackson, a biologist who has been studying snow leopard in the wild for 30 years, the Conservancy seeks to conserve the species by &quot;promoting innovative grassroots measures that lead local people to become better stewards of endangered snow leopards, their prey, and habitat.&quot; Rhett Butler