tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:/xml/mozambique1 Mozambique news from mongabay.com 2014-10-01T14:35:46Z tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13846 2014-09-30T02:03:00Z 2014-10-01T14:35:46Z Joint force uses Google Earth to find elephant poaching camps in Mozambique, captures poachers in raid <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0929-guns-3-thumb.png" align="left"/></td></tr></table>On Monday, September 22, two ivory poachers were arrested in Mozambique during a late-night raid near Niassa National Reserve. The arrest followed on the heels of nearly two-dozen reported kills in the reserve in just the first two weeks of the month. Morgan Erickson-Davis -11.880410 37.467319 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13775 2014-09-12T17:05:00Z 2014-09-12T17:09:28Z WCS-led raids lead to six arrests near Mozambique’s largest reserve <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/14/0912-forest-elephant-thumb.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A joint force of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and government authorities are in the midst of carrying out a series of raids against poachers in Mozambique aimed at halting the illegal killing of elephants in Niassa National Reserve, the country’s largest protected area. Six men, thought to be responsible for killing 39 elephants in 2014, were arrested in an early morning bust in the town of Marrupa, just south of the park. Morgan Erickson-Davis -11.880809 37.467158 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13679 2014-08-17T20:14:00Z 2014-08-17T20:29:13Z Google Earth spurs discovery of a 'new' chameleon species <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/i/australia/150/0817Rampholeon-Maspictus-Credit-William-R-Branch150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Google Earth has spurred the discovery of another new species. In this case, the creature is a pygmy chameleon, one of four previously unknown <i>Rhampholeon</i> chameleon species described from the remote ‘sky islands’ in Mozambique. The Mount Mabu pygmy chameleon was discovered after Google Earth images of a tract of forest led Julian Bayliss to launch a scientific expedition to the region. Rhett Butler -16.301687 36.371398 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13652 2014-08-12T03:52:00Z 2014-08-12T03:57:02Z China failing to take effective action against timber smugglers Voluntary guidelines established by the Chinese government won't be enough to curb rampant timber smuggling by Chinese companies, putting 'responsible' actors at risk of having their reputations tarnished, argues a new campaign by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA). Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/13490 2014-07-03T19:01:00Z 2014-07-03T19:18:09Z U.S should sanction Mozambique for its role in elephant, rhino poaching, urges NGOs Two prominent NGOs U.S should sanction Mozambique for its role in elephant, rhino poaching, urges NGOsare petitioning the U.S government to slap Mozambique with trade sanctions due to the country's role in regional poaching. The groups contend that Mozambique has done little to combat both its own poaching epidemic or stop its nationals from spilling over the border to kill rhinos and elephants in South Africa and Tanzania. Jeremy Hance -23.861151 31.754577 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12827 2014-02-25T23:28:00Z 2014-02-26T01:22:40Z Illegal logging surges in Mozambique Illegal logging has spiked over the past five years in Mozambique, finds a new report by researchers at the University of Eduardo Mondlane. Rhett Butler -11.738302 40.074692 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12651 2014-01-17T16:11:00Z 2014-02-28T14:49:26Z Over 1,000 rhinos killed by poachers in South Africa last year In another sign that Africa's poaching crisis has gotten completely out of control, South Africa lost 1,004 rhinos to poachers last year. According to the numbers released today by the South African Department of Environmental Affairs, 2013 was the worst year yet for rhino poaching in the country with nearly 3 rhinos killed every day. Jeremy Hance -23.962254 31.566439 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12480 2013-12-04T16:39:00Z 2014-02-20T19:18:12Z Sky islands: exploring East Africa's last frontier <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/1204.Taveta-two-horned-chameleon-(Kinyongia-tavetana),-South-Pare-Mts.-Tanzania.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The montane rainforests of East Africa are little-known to the global public. The Amazon and Congo loom much larger in our minds, while the savannas of East Africa remain the iconic ecosystems for the region. However these ancient, biodiverse forests&#8212;sitting on the tops of mountains rising from the African savanna&#8212;are home to some remarkable species, many found only in a single forest. A team of international scientists&#8212;Michele Menegon, Fabio Pupin, and Simon Loader&#8212;have made it their mission to document the little-known reptiles and amphibians in these so-called sky islands, many of which are highly imperiled. Jeremy Hance -12.077428 37.631686 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/12083 2013-09-17T15:03:00Z 2013-09-17T16:19:20Z Lions rising: community conservation making a difference for Africa's kings in Mozambique <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0917.LICM-11--Newst-male-lion-in-the-area.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Everyone knows that tigers, pandas, and blue whales are threatened with extinction&#8212;but lions!? Researchers were shocked to recently discover that lion populations have fallen precipitously: down to around 30,000 animals across the African continent. While 30,000 may sound like a lot, this is a nearly 70 percent decline since 1960. In addition, lion populations are increasingly fragmented with a number of populations having vanished altogether. However, there is hope: one place where lion populations are actually on the rise is Niassa National Reserve in Mozambique. Here, lion populations have risen by around 60 percent in just seven years. In part this is due to the effort of Colleen and Keith Begg. Jeremy Hance -12.004398 37.446442 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11545 2013-06-04T18:26:00Z 2013-06-04T19:09:47Z Chewbacca bat, beetle with explosive farts among oddities spotted on Mozambique expedition <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://mongabay-images.s3.amazonaws.com/13/0604Gorongosa_10_150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>The 'Chewbaka' bat, a cave-dwelling frog, and a diminutive elephant shrew were among hundreds of species documented during a one-month survey of a park that was ravaged during Mozambique's 17-year civil war. The findings suggest that biodiversity in Gorongosa National Park in Central Mozambique is well on the road towards recovery, opening a new chapter for the 4,000-square-kilometer protected area. Rhett Butler -18.539513 35.304136 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11528 2013-05-30T16:29:00Z 2013-05-30T16:38:50Z Saving Gorongosa: E.O. Wilson on protecting a biodiversity hotspot in Mozambique <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0530.gorgongosa.wilson.2.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>If you fly over the Great African Rift Valley from its northernmost point in Ethiopia, over the great national parks of Kenya and Tanzania, and follow it south to the very end, you will arrive at Gorongosa National Park in central Mozambique. Plateaus on the eastern and western sides of the park flank the lush valley in the center. Dramatic limestone cliffs, unexplored caves, wetlands, vast grasslands, rivers, lakes, and a patchwork of savanna and forest contribute to the incredible diversity of this park. What makes this place truly unique, however, is Mount Gorongosa&#8212;a towering massif that overlooks the valley below. Jeremy Hance -18.890695 34.573059 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11308 2013-04-25T22:39:00Z 2013-04-25T22:51:26Z Rhinos now extinct in Mozambique's Limpopo National Park Poachers have likely killed off the last rhinos in Mozambique's Limpopo National Park, according to a park official. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/11062 2013-03-18T16:03:00Z 2013-03-21T00:08:49Z Forgotten lions: shedding light on the fate of lions in unprotected areas <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0318.lions-03-18-at-9.33.18-AM.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>African lions (<i>Panthera leo</i>) living outside of protected areas like national parks or reserves also happen to be studied much less than those residing within protected areas, to the detriment of lion conservation initiatives. In response to this trend, a group of researchers surveyed an understudied, unprotected region in northwestern Mozambique called the Tete Province, whose geography and proximity to two national parks suggests a presence of lions. Jeremy Hance -16.165218 33.605404 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10848 2013-02-07T20:17:00Z 2013-02-24T00:17:11Z Report: nearly half the timber from Mozambique to China is illegal <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/13/0207.Log-truck-en-route-to-Beira,-Mozambique,-September-2012-(c)-EIA.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Forty-eight percent of the timber making its way from Mozambique's forests to Chinese companies was harvested illegally, according to a new report by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), which blames the problem on widespread corruption and poor governance. The illegal logging cost Mozambique, the world's fourth least-developed country in the world according to the UN, $29 million in tax revenue, says the report. Jeremy Hance -19.837122 34.852753 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10487 2012-11-29T18:02:00Z 2012-11-29T18:14:26Z 'Exporting deforestation': China is the kingpin of illegal logging <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/Logs-smuggled-across-the-land-border-from-Myanmar-into-Yunnan-province,-China,-April-2012-(c)-EIA.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Runaway economic growth comes with costs: in the case of China's economic engine, one of them has been the world's forests. According to a new report by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), China has become the number one importer of illegal wood products from around the world. Illegal logging&#8212;which threatens biodiversity, emits carbon, impoverishes local communities, and is often coupled with other crimes&#8212;has come under heavy pressure in recent years from the U.S., the EU, and Australia. Each of these has implemented, or will soon implement, new laws that make importing and selling illegal wood products domestic crimes. However, China's unwillingness to tackle its vast appetite for illegal timber means the trade continues to decimate forests worldwide. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/10386 2012-11-13T15:45:00Z 2012-11-13T15:54:41Z Photos: Mozambique creates Africa's biggest marine protected area <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/mongabay-images/12/7-Dugong-coastal-east-Africa_GPN224980.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Last week, the East African nation of Mozambique announced it was protecting 10,411 square kilometers (4,020 square miles) of coastal marine waters, making the new Marine Protected Area (MPA) the biggest on the continent. The protected area, dubbed the Primeiras and Segundas Archipelago ("First" and "Second" islands), includes ten islands as well as mangrove forests, rich coral reefs, and seagrass ecosystems. Jeremy Hance -16.573352 39.805841 tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/9644 2012-06-11T12:35:00Z 2012-06-18T00:23:06Z Ten African nations pledge to transform their economies to take nature into account Last month ten African nations, led by Botswana, pledged to incorporate "natural capital" into their economies. Natural capital, which seeks to measure the economic worth of the services provided by ecosystems and biodiversity&#8212;for example pollination, clean water, and carbon&#8212;is a nascent, but growing, method to curtail environmental damage and ensure more sustainable development. Dubbed the Gaborone Declaration, the pledge was signed by Botswana, Liberia, Namibia, Mozambique, Rwanda, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, South Africa, and Tanzania following a two day summit. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/8552 2011-10-16T17:35:00Z 2011-10-16T17:35:22Z Fertilizer trees boost yields in Africa Fertilizer trees&#8212;which fix nitrogen in the soil&#8212;have improved crops yields in five African countries, according to a new study in the International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability. In some cases yields have doubled with the simple addition of nitrogen-soaking trees. The research found that fertilizer trees could play a role in alleviating hunger on the continent while improving environmental conditions. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7386 2011-02-02T19:44:00Z 2011-02-08T18:06:19Z From Cambodia to California: the world's top 10 most threatened forests <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/10forests.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Growing populations, expanding agriculture, commodities such as palm oil and paper, logging, urban sprawl, mining, and other human impacts have pushed many of the world's great forests to the brink. Yet scientists, environmentalists, and even some policymakers increasingly warn that forests are worth more standing than felled. They argue that by safeguarding vulnerable biodiversity, sequestering carbon, controlling erosion, and providing fresh water, forests provide services to humanity, not to mention the unquantifiable importance of having wild places in an increasingly human-modified world. Still, the decline of the world's forests continues: the FAO estimating that around 10 million hectares of tropical forest are lost every year. Of course, some of these forests are more imperiled than others, and a new analysis by Conservation International (CI) has catalogued the world's 10 most threatened forests. Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/7370 2011-01-31T17:30:00Z 2011-06-14T16:34:10Z 'Land grab' fears in Africa legitimate <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/j/madagascar_4738.150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>A new report by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) has found that recent large-scale land deals in Africa are likely to provide scant benefit to some of the world's poorest and most famine-prone nations and will probably create new social and environmental problems. Analyzing 12 recent land leasing contracts investigators found a number of concerns, including contracts that are only a few pages long, exclusion of local people, and in one case actually giving land away for free. Many of the contracts last for 100 years, threatening to separate local communities from the land they live on indefinitely. "Most contracts for large-scale land deals in Africa are negotiated in secret," explains report author Lorenzo Cotula in a press release. "Only rarely do local landholders have a say in those negotiations and few contracts are publicly available after they have been signed." Jeremy Hance tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4896 2009-08-25T03:33:00Z 2012-09-12T21:16:19Z Solar powered conservation <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/09/0825gold.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Electricity can be a difficult commodity to procure in the remote areas where conservationists often work. Typically field researchers and wildlife rangers rely on gas-powered generators, which require imported fuel, often produce noxious fumes and disruptive noise, and can be costly to maintain. A better option, especially in sun-drenched parts of the world, is solar. Clean and silent, with no need for supplemental fuel, solar seems like an ideal fit for conservation work except for one major drawback: cost. But Stephen Gold – Solar and Technology Manager for Wildlife Conservation Network has been working to overcome that obstacle. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4685 2009-06-29T04:36:00Z 2009-06-29T05:46:32Z Rainforest discovered via Google Earth to be protected Mozambique has agreed to protect a tract of highland forest discovered by scientists using Google Earth, reports <i>The Guardian</i>. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/4579 2009-05-28T15:23:00Z 2009-06-01T22:32:30Z Indigenous people, forest communities in Africa control less than 2% of forest land Less than 2 percent of Africa’s tropical forests are under community control, hindering efforts to slow deforestation and alleviate rural poverty, reports a new assessment from the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) and the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI), a global coalition of non-governmental and community organizations. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/3573 2008-12-22T16:32:00Z 2009-02-21T23:08:21Z Photos: Google Earth used to find new species <table align="left"><tr><td><img src="http://photos.mongabay.com/08/1222chameleon150.jpg" align="left"/></td></tr></table>Scientists have used Google Earth to find a previously unknown trove of biological diversity in Mozambique, reports the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew. Scouring satellite images via Google Earth for potential conservation sites at elevations of 1600 meters or more, Julian Bayliss a locally-based conservationist, in 2005 spotted a 7,000-hectare tract of forest on Mount Mabu. The scientifically unexplored forest had previously only been known to villagers. Subsequent expeditions in October and November this year turned up hundreds of species of plants and animals, including some that are new to science. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/643 2005-12-05T15:19:39Z 2008-12-29T06:42:24Z Mozambique Gets World Bank conservation, Tourism Project More of Mozambique&#39;s natural ecosystems will be conserved, and thus draw more tourism to the country, thanks to a World Bank-funded project that aims to promote economic growth through sustainable use of natural resources. Rhett Butler tag:news.mongabay.com,2005:Article/412 2005-09-23T15:19:39Z 2008-12-29T06:42:12Z 10 million people will need humanitarian assistance in Southern Africa As many as 10 million people in Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe have been assessed as food insecure and will need humanitarian assistance until the next harvest according to a food security brief from USAID. Rhett Butler