Featured video: local communities successfully conserve forests in Ethiopia

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
April 17, 2013



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A participatory forest management (PFM) program in Ethiopia has made good on forest preservation and expansion, according a recent article and video interview (below) from the Guardian. After 15 years, the program has aided one community in expanding its forest by 9.2 percent in the last decade, while still allowing community access to forest for smallscale logging in Ethiopia's Bale Mountains. In addition, alternative livelihoods were also set up in the form of coffee growing, honey production, and bamboo. The program, currently supported by UK NGO Farm Africa and Ethiopian NGO SOS Sahel, is now looking at applying for REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) funds.

















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CITATION:
Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com (April 17, 2013).

Featured video: local communities successfully conserve forests in Ethiopia.

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