Brazil decree opens tribal lands to mining, dams in 'national interest'

Rhett Butler, mongabay.com
July 26, 2012



Directive also freezes demarcation of new indigenous territories

Map of indigenous lands in Brazil as of April 2008.Map of indigenous territories in Brazil as of April 2008. Courtesy of FUNAI

A directive signed Monday by Brazil’s Solicitor-General could hamper the efforts of indigenous tribes to win government recognition of their traditional lands, reports Survival International, a human rights group focused on native peoples.

The directive "opens up all indigenous areas to mineral, dams, roads, military bases and other developments of 'national interest' without the need to consult with or address concerns of indigenous peoples", according to an expert familiar with the directive who asked to remain anonymous. It also restricts demarcation of new indigenous territories.

Survival International called the move "disastrous" citing the plight of the Guarani tribe, some members of which are waiting "in roadside camps or overcrowded reserves" for their ancestral lands to be mapped and allocated.

"This directive puts our survival in extreme danger," Survival International quoted a Guarani spokesman as saying. "We are being ignored as human beings, as the first occupants of this land. It is the start of the extermination of indigenous people."


Kayapo father and son in Brazil.
According to the indigenous lands expert reached by mongabay.com, the directive was originally intended to overcome issues in implementing the Raposa/Serra do Sol indigenous area in the northern Brazilian state of Roraima, but the powerful ruralista bloc in Congress pushed to apply the directive to all indigenous areas. The ruralistas also successfully pushed for a weakening of the country's Forest Code, which mandates how much forest landowners are required to protect, earlier this year. (The final version of the Forest Code is pending).

However outcry over the directive on Wednesday led Brazil's Public Prosecutors' Office to suspend the measure pending a court ruling on the issue. Survival International and several Brazilian indigenous organizations have called for the directive to be revoked entirely.

The directive was passed only a month after an association of more than 1,200 tropical scientists convening at the annual meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation sounded the alarm on the potential development.

Indigenous territories cover roughly 22 percent of the legal Brazilian Amazon. Areas managed by indigenous groups have lower deforestation rates than unprotected forests.














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CITATION:
Rhett Butler, mongabay.com (July 26, 2012).

Brazil decree opens tribal lands to mining, dams in 'national interest'.

http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0726-brazil-indigenous-directive.html