Deforestation jumps, but Guyana nonetheless qualifies for REDD payment

mongabay.com
November 07, 2010



Guyana's deforestation rate over the past 12 months was roughly three times the average annual rate over the prior 20 year period, but was still well below the baseline under the recent $250 million forest conservation partnership with Norway, according to a new report released by Guyana Forestry Commission's REDD+ Monitoring Reporting and Verification System (MRVS).

As reported in Stabroek News, the Interim Measures Report 2010 found that Guyana lost 10,287 hectares of forest from October 1, 2009 to September 2010, or about 0.06 percent of its forest cover. While the loss was three times the 0.02 percent annual rate from 1990 to 2009, it came in 12,969 hectares below the level allotted under the Guyana-Norway partnership, meaning that Guyana has met its fist year commitment despite a rising deforestation rate.

The report attributed 91 percent of last year's deforestation to mining, which has accounted for 60 percent of Guyana's deforestation since 2000. 85 percent of last year's deforestation occurred on state forest lands. Most forest conversion is occurring near "existing road infrastructure and navigable rivers".

High mineral and metal prices are contributing to the increase in mining in Guyana.






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CITATION:
mongabay.com (November 07, 2010).

Deforestation jumps, but Guyana nonetheless qualifies for REDD payment.

http://news.mongabay.com/2010/1107-guyana_redd.html