20,000 orangutans killed or poached in 10 years without a single prosecution

mongabay.com
August 24, 2009





At least 20,000 orangutans have been killed or captured for the illegal pet trade in the past ten years in Indonesia without a single prosecution, according to a report published by Nature Alert and the Centre for Orangutan Protection, groups that campaign on behalf of orangutans.

The report, titled The Indonesian Chainsaw Massacre, blames the Indonesian government and the palm oil industry for failing to curb the killing and trade of the endangered red ape.

"People who capture or buy orangutans know there is zero chance of being prosecuted," said the groups in a joint statement. "Military, police and local government officials have all been found with orangutans in their homes in the full knowledge they are breaking the law."


Kalimantan, 2009
"The Ministry of Forestry continues, with seeming impunity, to grant permits to destroy forests known to be inhabited by protected species such as orangutans, elephants, and tigers."

The report urges the Indonesian government to enforce existing laws designed to protect endangered species; immediately stop issuing new permits, and cancel existing permits, for logging and plantation concessions in forests that contain orangutans; and ban new roads that bisect orangutan habitat.

"Three, simple, concrete steps the government could easily take, and in so doing, save forests, wildlife and demonstrate to the world it is now serious about saving what little is left of its natural environment and flagship species like orangutans, tigers and elephants," concluded the statement.

The Indonesian Chainsaw Massacre





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CITATION:
mongabay.com (August 24, 2009).

20,000 orangutans killed or poached in 10 years without a single prosecution.

http://news.mongabay.com/2009/0824-orangutans.html